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Topic: Theaetetus


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  Theaetetus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Theaetetus was no doubt inspired by the work of Theodorus to work on incommensurables, and that he made major contributions to the theory.
Theaetetus is also thought to be the author of the theory of proportion which appears in Eudoxus's work.
Theaetetus was the first to study the octahedron and the icosahedron, the other 3 Platonic solids being studied by the Pythagoreans.
www.stetson.edu /~efriedma/periodictable/html/Te.html   (248 words)

  
 PLATO'S DISCUSSION OF "KNOWLEDGE" IN THE THEAETETUS AND THE REPUBLIC - Jud Evans - Athenaeum Library of ...
The Theaetetus is aporetic - it is a dialogue that ends in an insoluble contradiction or paradox of meanings, though the development of the dialectic is both fascinating and highly educative epistemologically.
Socrates rejects Theaetetus' suggested definition of 'perception as knowledge' and concludes that it relegates the contextual definition to a doctrine which rules out a concise explanation of the meaning of the word 'knowledge,' for all criteria of judgment are relative to the individuals and situations involved.
Theaetetus acknowledges that thanks to Socrates he has already given utterance to more than he had in him.
evans-experientialism.freewebspace.com /evans_theaetetus.htm   (2843 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Theaetetus
Plato's 'Theaetetus': on the way to the logos.
He is supposed to have contributed to the theory of irrationals of Euclid, Bk.
The Review of Metaphysics; 12/1/1999; 657 words; The Theaetetus on How We Think, DAVID BARTON The author argues that Plato's purpose in the discussion of false belief in the Theaetetus is to entertain and then to reject the idea that thinking is a kind of mental grasping.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Theaetetus   (820 words)

  
  Theaetetus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
In appearance Theaetetus had a snub nose and protruding eyes but he is described by Plato as having a beautiful mind and he is also described as being the perfect gentleman.
Theaetetus, of Heraclea in Pontus, philosopher and pupil of Plato.
Theaetetus is also thought to be the author of the theory of proportion which appears in Eudoxus's work.
www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk /~history/Mathematicians/Theaetetus.html   (1202 words)

  
 The Internet Classics Archive | Theaetetus by Plato
Theaetetus, Socrates, is his name; but I rather think that the property disappeared in the hands of trustees; notwithstanding which he is wonderfully liberal.
But that, Theaetetus, was not the point of my question: we wanted to know not the subjects, nor yet the number of the arts or sciences, for we were not going to count them, but we wanted to know the nature of knowledge in the abstract.
I see, my dear Theaetetus, that Theodorus had a true insight into your nature when he said that you were a philosopher, for wonder is the feeling of a philosopher, and philosophy begins in wonder.
classics.mit.edu /Plato/theatu.html   (7652 words)

  
 Plato’s Theaetetus [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy]
The Theaetetus is one of the middle to later dialogues of the ancient Greek philosopher Plato.
The Theaetetus poses a special difficulty for Plato scholars trying to interpret the dialogue: in light of Plato’s metaphysical and epistemological commitments, expounded in earlier dialogues such as the Republic, the Forms are the only suitable objects of knowledge, and yet the Theaetetus fails explicitly to acknowledge them.
Theaetetus offers the following mathematical example to show that he understands Socrates’ definitional requirements: the geometrical equivalents of what are now called “surds” could be grouped in one class and given a single name (“powers”) by dint of their common characteristic of irrationality or incommensurability.
www.iep.utm.edu /t/theatetu.htm   (4442 words)

  
 Ziniewicz on Theaetetus of Plato Part 1
Theodorus sees what Theaetetus and Socrates have in common (their snub-nosed appearance and predisposition to inquire), but he does not see how they differ, a critical mistake if knowledge means grasp of difference as well as identity (the common).
Theaetetus and Theodorus really learn and really "become" better in relation to a Socrates who is comparatively steady (like a navigator who steers a steady course by relying upon the stable proportions of the heavens).
Theodorus says of Theaetetus, "he moves surely and smoothly and successfully in the path of knowledge and inquiry; and he is full of gentleness, flowing on silently like a river of oil...." (144b) The result of the motion of learning is the stasis of knowing.
www.fred.net /tzaka/theatet1.html   (2614 words)

  
 THEAETETUS
Theaetetus, Socrates, is his name; but I rather think that the property disappeared in the hands of trustees; notwithstanding which he is wonderfully liberal.
But that, Theaetetus, was not the point of my question: we wanted to know not the subjects, nor yet the number of the arts or sciences, for we were not going to count them, but we wanted to know the nature of knowledge in the abstract.
You, Theaetetus, who are a young rogue, must not instigate your elders to a breach of faith, but should prepare to answer Socrates in the remainder of the argument.
www.sacred-texts.com /cla/plato/theaetet.htm   (16363 words)

  
 [No title]
You, Theaetetus, who are a young rogue, must not instigate your elders to a breach of faith, but should prepare to answer Socrates in the remainder of the argument.
You are a beauty, Theaetetus, and not ugly, as Theodorus was saying; for he who utters the beautiful is himself beautiful and good.
He who led the way into the river, Theaetetus, said "The experiment will show"; and perhaps if we go forward in the search, we may stumble upon the thing which we are looking for; but if we stay where we are, nothing will come to light.
eserver.org /philosophy/plato/theaetetus.txt   (16491 words)

  
 ranner.doc
Theaetetus is to answer a question to which there are two possible answers.
Now, it is Theaetetus’ confession of his dilemma which leads Socrates to his remarks about the origin of philosophy.
However, Theaetetus, who is more mature than the young Socrates, is said to be particularly apt for philosophical inquiry precisely because he finds it impossible to discard his aporia.
www.apaclassics.org /AnnualMeeting/03mtg/abstracts/ranner.html   (736 words)

  
 Plato on Knowledge in the Theaetetus
Theaetetus admits this, and contrasts the ease with which he and his classmates define mathematical terms with his inability to define of knowledge (147c-148e).
Their line on the Theaetetus will be that its argument does not support the theory of Forms; that the Theaetetus is interesting precisely because it shows us how good at epistemology Plato is once he frees himself from his obsession with the Forms.
Theaetetus is puzzled by his own inability to answer Socrates' request for a definition of knowledge, and contrasts it with the ease with which he can provide mathematical definitions.
plato.stanford.edu /entries/plato-theaetetus   (14763 words)

  
 The Sophist, by Plato (sophist)
THEAETETUS: I certainly admit what I at first disputed—that there are two kinds of vice in the soul, and that we ought to consider cowardice, intemperance, and injustice to be alike forms of disease in the soul, and ignorance, of which there are all sorts of varieties, to be deformity.
THEAETETUS: They would distinguish: the soul would be said by them to have a body; but as to the other qualities of justice, wisdom, and the like, about which you asked, they would not venture either to deny their existence, or to maintain that they were all corporeal.
THEAETETUS: Certainly, Stranger, there appears to be truth in what was said about the Sophist at first, that he was of a class not easily caught, for he seems to have abundance of defences, which he throws up, and which must every one of them be stormed before we can reach the man himself.
etext.library.adelaide.edu.au /p/p71so/sophist.html   (16631 words)

  
 THEAETETUS
Theaetetus agrees to digress with Socrates, and both now set out to explain the possibility of making a false judgement (with the intention of then retrieving the notion of true judgement).
Theaetetus suggests that one may have "pieces of ignorance" flying about with the "pieces of knowledge," and that error arises when we grasp a piece of ignorance (199e).
Theaetetus and Socrates approach the problem by investigating various modes of explanation The first, strangely enough, is presented through the image of a dream which Socrates had once had (201d-202c).
caae.phil.cmu.edu /Cavalier/80250/Plato/Theatetus/Theat.html   (5024 words)

  
 Ziniewicz on Theaetetus of Plato Part Two
Theaetetus' regard for Theodorus (a friend of Pythagoras) and his youthful susceptibility to sophistic persuasion and public opinion tip the balance of the discussion toward understanding "perception" (which could also mean the "I see" of sudden insight) as sense-perception of concrete particulars.
Theaetetus, who should know that the content of mathematics is not subjective, lets the argument fall into the domain of subjectivity, unaware that seeing essences might be different from seeing drawings.
In the Theaetetus digression, the philosopher and the politician are deliberately caricatured in order to "illustrate" (as geometric drawings illustrate geometrical proportions) the difference between sensation (with its consequent subjectivity) and thought (with its consequent universality).
www.fred.net /tzaka/theatet2.html   (3642 words)

  
 Square root of 2 is irrational
Now it occurred to us, since the number of square roots appeared to be unlimited, to try to gather them into one class, by which we could henceforth describe all the roots.
Theaetetus: Such lines as form the sides of equilateral plane numbers we called lengths, and such as form the oblong numbers we called roots, because they are not commensurable with others in length, but only with the plane areas which they have the power to form.
Below we shall concentrate on the one root -- that of 2 -- that Theaetetus has not mentioned and at times suggest an extension to a more general result.
www.cut-the-knot.org /proofs/sq_root.shtml   (1951 words)

  
 Theaetetus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
The Theaetetus itself ends in such a puzzling way as to...
apparent failure of his conversation with Theaetetus is markedly distinct from his express attitude...
(Theaetetus 158b)(3) Zhuangzi might have answered Theaetetus: While we dream we do not know that we...
hallencyclopedia.com /Theaetetus   (478 words)

  
 Theaetetus, by Plato (theaetetus)
THEAETETUS: You are thinking of being and not being, likeness and unlikeness, sameness and difference, and also of unity and other numbers which are applied to objects of sense; and you mean to ask, through what bodily organ the soul perceives odd and even numbers and other arithmetical conceptions.
THEAETETUS: Indeed, Socrates, I cannot answer; my only notion is, that these, unlike objects of sense, have no separate organ, but that the mind, by a power of her own, contemplates the universals in all things.
THEAETETUS: Certainly not; many would think that they are eleven, and in the higher numbers the chance of error is greater still; for I assume you to be speaking of numbers in general.
etext.library.adelaide.edu.au /p/p71th/theaetetus.html   (15713 words)

  
 Theaetetus by Plato eBook by BookRags
The general character of the Theaetetus is dialectical, and there are traces of the same Megarian influences which appear in the Parmenides, and which later writers, in their matter of fact way, have explained by the residence of Plato at Megara.
No more definite date is indicated by the engagement in which Theaetetus is said to have fallen or to have been wounded, and which may have taken place any time during the Corinthian war, between the years 390-387.
We cannot exclude the possibility which has been already noticed in reference to other works of Plato, that the Theaetetus may not have been all written continuously; or the probability that the Sophist and Politicus, which differ greatly in style, were only appended after a long interval of time.
www.bookrags.com /ebooks/1726/2.html   (493 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: Books: Plato's Theaetetus: Part I of the Being of the Beautiful   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Theaetetus, the Sophist, and the Statesman are a trilogy of Platonic dialogues that show Socrates formulating his conception of philosophy as he prepares the defense for his trial.
Plato's Theaetetus is the first dialogue in a trilogy, (the other two dialogues being the Sophist and the Statesman).
Their discussion goes through a long "immanent critique" of the notion that knowledge is immediate sensory givens, and then looks at the question whether the supplementation of judgment will be sufficient to explain knowledge.
www.amazon.ca /exec/obidos/ASIN/0226670317   (629 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Books: Theaetetus (Penguin Classics)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Plato's Theory of Knowledge : The Theaetetus and the Sophist (Dover Philosophical Classics) by Francis M. Cornford
Theaetetus records the first critical attempt to come to grips with certain intricate and vexing problems of human knowledge.
The historical importance of the Theaetetus is that the chief problems in this field were first raised and discussed in it.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0140444505?v=glance   (375 words)

  
 Theaetetus - PLATO - Plato - Benjamin Jowett - Microsoft Reader eBook - Download Now!
It is clear that Plato held Theaetetus in the highest regard and he wrote two dialogues which had Theaetetus as the principal character, one of the dialogues being Theaetetus while the other is the Sophist.
In Theaetetus a discussion between Socrates, Theaetetus and his teacher Theodorus of Cyrene is recorded.
This conversation took place in 399 BC and Theaetetus is described as a youth at the time.
www.ebookmall.com /ebook/139396-ebook.htm   (855 words)

  
 Table of contents for Reading Plato's Theaetetus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
The overall structure of the Theaetetus 15 5.
Alternative interpretations of the Theaetetus as a whole 16 6.
The statement of Theaetetus' first genuine definition (D1): 151d8-e4 53 12.
www.loc.gov /catdir/toc/ecip056/2005000198.html   (405 words)

  
 GBT2 Theaetetus Study Questions
Who is Theaetetus, and what is the question which Socrates wants to discuss with him?
What is Theaetetus' first answer, and how does Socrates respond to it (146d-e)?
Now Socrates and Theaetetus make a new attempt to explain knowledge as "true belief accompanied by a rational account" (201d).
www.oxfordtutorials.com /GBT2StudyQ8.htm   (561 words)

  
 THEAETETUS by Plato
[Theod.] Theaetetus, Socrates, is his name; but I rather think that the property disappeared in the hands of trustees; notwithstanding which he is wonderfully liberal.
[Soc.] But that, Theaetetus, was not the point of my question: we wanted to know not the subjects, nor yet the number of the arts or sciences, for we were not going to count them, but we wanted to know the nature of knowledge in the abstract.
[Theod.] You, Theaetetus, who are a young rogue, must not instigate your elders to a breach of faith, but should prepare to answer Socrates in the remainder of the argument.
www.austin.cc.tx.us /philosophy/library/Plato/theaetet.htm   (14960 words)

  
 Amazon.ca: Books: The Midwife of Platonism: Text and Subtext in Plato's Theaetetus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Plato's Theaetetus is an acknowledged masterpiece, and among the most influential texts in the history of epistemology.
Since antiquity it has been debated whether this dialogue was written by Plato to support his familiar metaphysical doctrines, or represents a self-distancing from these.
The book is addressed to all readers interested in Plato, and does not require knowledge of Greek.
www.amazon.ca /exec/obidos/ASIN/0199267030   (351 words)

  
 Reading Questions -- Theaetetus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Why does Theaetetus say that not all opinion is knowledge?
Do Theaetetus and Socrates arrive at a definition of knowledge that satisfies them?
What benefit to Theaetetus does Socrates think their investigation has had?
www.ocf.berkeley.edu /~brianwc/courses/reading/theaetetus.html   (85 words)

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