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Topic: Theft Act 1968


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In the News (Sat 20 Apr 19)

  
  Theft Act 1968 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Theft Act 1968 (1968 c.60) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, governing most of the general property offences in English law.
The Theft Act 1968 resulted from the efforts of the Criminal Law Revision Committee to reform the English law of theft.
The intention of the Theft Act 1968, was to replace the existing law of larceny and other deception-related offences, by a single enactment, creating a more coherent body of principles that would allow the law to evolve to meet new situations.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Theft_Act_1968   (598 words)

  
 Theft - WikiCrimeLine   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Theft is an either-way offence, which carries a penalty on conviction on indictment of up to seven years imprisonment.
To prove the theft of cash, it will be necessary to prove that cash was withdrawn and that the cash withdrawn could not have represented funds, which were legitimately in the account in addition to the dishonestly obtained funds.
Theft should be charged if there is difficulty in proving that force was used in order to steal property from a victim or in circumstances when the theft was complete before there was any use of force by the accused.
www.crimeupdate.net /crimebook/index.php?title=Theft   (2826 words)

  
 Oxford University Press | Online Resource Centre | Selected Criminal Law Terms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
appropriation of property is the act of theft) accompanied by specified circumstances (e.g.
Examples of such acts are those carried out while sleepwalking or in a state of concussion or hypnotic trance, a spasm or reflex action, and acts carried out by a diabetic who suffers a hypoglycaemic episode.
The Act expressly states that a person is not dishonest if he believes (even if unreasonably) that he is legally entitled to appropriate the property or that the owner would consent or could not be discovered by taking reasonable steps.
www.oup.com /uk/orc/bin/qanda/books/05criminal/terms/?view=za   (2629 words)

  
 Theft (Amendment) Act 1996
Acts of Parliament printed from this website are printed under the superintendence and authority of the Controller of HMSO being the Queen's Printer of Acts of Parliament.
It should be noted that the right to reproduce the text of Acts of Parliament does not extend to the Queen's Printer imprints which should be removed from any copies of the Act which are issued or made available to the public.
An Act to amend the Theft Act 1968 and the Theft Act 1978; and for connected purposes.
www.opsi.gov.uk /acts/acts1996/1996062.htm   (1268 words)

  
 The CPS : Theft Acts, incorporating the Charging Standard   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Theft, contrary to section 1 of the 1968 Act.
This means theft in accordance with the provisions of section 1 of the 1968 Act.
When there is no theft, or difficulty in proving and essential element of theft, but there is evidence of the use of force against the victim, a charge of threatening behaviour, assault or assault with intent to rob may be more appropriate.
www.cps.gov.uk /legal/section8/chapter_a.html   (8230 words)

  
 StudyCrime.com -- Theft   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
Legally, theft is generally considered to be synonymous with larceny, although in common with many legal terms, its precise definition varies between jurisdictions.
In the common law, theft is usually defined as the unauthorised taking or use of someone else's property with the intent to permanently deprive the owner or the person with rightful possession of that property or its use.
For example, in England and Wales, the Theft Act 1968 defines it as: "...the dishonest appropriation of property belonging to another with the intention of permanently depriving the other (the owner or person in lawful possession) of it".
www.studycrime.com /theft.html   (491 words)

  
 DPP v Gomez, HL decision
Prior to the passage of the Theft Act 1968, which made radical changes in and greatly simplified the law relating to theft and some other offences, it was necessary to prove that the property alleged to have been stolen was taken `without the consent of the owner’ (Larceny Act 1916, section 1(1)).
A reading of the Act of 1968, which was based on the draft Bill annexed to the report, leads me to the conclusion that, when using the very words of the draft, Parliament intended to implement the committee’s thinking.
If `converts’ in the [Act of 1916] implied an unauthorised act, notwithstanding its proximity to the definition of larceny with its requirement of the absence of the owner’s consent, there is, a fortiori, no reason why the word `appropriates’ in the [Act of 1968] should not be similarly construed.
www.leeds.ac.uk /law/hamlyn/gomez-hl.htm   (17903 words)

  
 Criminal Law -Common Offences
Theft says s.1 Theft Act 1968 is the dishonest appropriation of another's property with the intention to deprive the other of it permanently.
Mens rea is the fault-level of the accused in the act or mission; it is often included in the definition of serious crimes e.g., 'with malice aforethought'; it is 'the guilty mind' by intention, recklessness, or gross-negligence.
Food and Drugs Act 1995 -in Meah -v- Roberts 1977 of the unfitness of drink for human consumption the accused was innocent yet still guilty ~but in Warner -v- Metropolitan Police Commissioner 1969 (dangerous drugs case) 'one cannot be in possession the contents of a package when he/she does not know what it is'.
www.geocities.com /crmlw   (1351 words)

  
 Theft Act 1978 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Theft Act 1978 supplemented the earlier deception offences in English law contained in sections 15 and 16 of the Theft Act 1968 by reforming some aspects of those offences and adding new provisions.
There must be a deception which, according to s5(1), has the same meaning as in section 15(4) of the Theft Act 1968, i.e.
To be a theft, the goods must belong to another when the appropriation occurs.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Theft_Act_1978   (1932 words)

  
 Criminal Law Essays and Dissertations
Xena might face a charge of OPD contrary to S.15 Theft Act 1968 which defines the offence as committed by one who "by any deception dishonestly obtains property belonging to another, with the intention of permanently depriving him of it".
Under S.15(4) Theft Act 1968 this embraces "deception by words or conduct as to fact or law, including deception as to present intentions of the person using deception or any other person".
Note that Kelly will not be charged with either OPD or indeed Dishonestly Obtaining Services under S.1 Theft Act 1978 because she does not realise her lack of funds precedent to the meal, thus there is no dishonesty or deception.
www.law-essays-uk.com /essaysamples/criminallawessay/obtaining.htm   (1738 words)

  
 directopedia : Directory : Society : Crime : Theft
In the criminal law, theft (also known as stealing) is the wrongful taking of someone else's property without that person's freely-given consent.
If the act of stealing is complete before another comes into possession of the goods, this may be handling.
Theft in the U.S. Although many US states have retained larceny as the primary offence, some have now adopted theft provisions.
www.directopedia.org /directory/Society-Crime/Theft.shtml   (1172 words)

  
 [1997] 2 Web JCLI
(4) This is based on the provision in section 6(1) of the 1968 Act, which refers to the intention to permanently deprive being satisfied if the defendant treats the thing as his own to dispose of regardless of the other's rights and of 'borrowing'.
A person will be guilty of this offence if he or she knows, or believes that a wrongful credit has been made to his or her account or to an account in which he or she has an interest (for example, a joint bank account) and dishonestly fails to take action to cancel that credit.
However, the 1996 Act was intended to deal with only a fairly limited agenda, namely, the filling of the lacuna where there is a transfer of funds between bank accounts and other accounts of a similar kind.
webjcli.ncl.ac.uk /1997/issue2/clements2.html   (3222 words)

  
 Criminal law - aggravated burglary' - whether the offence can be committed if the weapon is not being carried by the ...
To commit the offence of aggravated burglary contrary to s.10 of the Theft Act 1968 a person must have a weapon of offence with him at the time of entry.
Held that when determining whether a charge of aggravated burglary under section 10(1) of the Theft Act 1968 was committed by use of an offensive weapon, the relevant time for consideration was when the theft actually occurred.
O’Leary had confronted the householders of a building which he had entered as a trespasser and demanded their cash and jewellery, which was the theft, and at the time he still had a kitchen knife in his hand which he had obtained downstairs in the same house.
www.rjerrard.co.uk /law/cases/klass.htm   (2116 words)

  
 BBC - h2g2 - Section 16(2)(a) of the '1968 Theft Act' (England and Wales)
Before 1968, theft and other, similar, offences were governed by a mass of conflicting legislation and common law
All previous theft legislation and common law were overruled, resulting in the creation of the first codified definition of law in England and Wales.
Section 15(4) 1968 Theft Act - (4) For the purposes of this section 'deception' means any deception (whether deliberate or reckless) by words or conduct as to fact or as to law, including a deception as the present intentions of the person using the deception or any other person.
www.bbc.co.uk /dna/h2g2/A580312   (2081 words)

  
 Theft Act 1968 (-), acts@swarb.co.uk, David Swarbrick, Solicitor, Wrigley Claydon
(1) A person is guilty of theft if he dishonestly appropriates property belonging to another with the intention of permanently depriving the other of it; and 'thief' and 'steal' shall be construed accordingly.
A person who dishonestly uses without due authority, or dishonestly causes to be wasted or diverted, any electricity shall on conviction on indictment be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years.
(2) The nature of the act or omission demanded is immaterial, and it is also immaterial whether the menaces relate to action to be taken by the person making the demand.
www.swarb.co.uk /acts/1968TheftAct.shtml   (4420 words)

  
 Theft Act 1968 - WikiCrimeLine   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
1.-(1) A person is guilty of theft if he dishonestly appropriates property belonging to another with the intention of permanently depriving the other of it; and "thief" and "steal" shall be construed accordingly.
A person guilty of theft shall on conviction on indictment be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years.(Reduced from ten years to seven years by s26 of the Criminal Justice Act 1991).
30.-(1) This Act shall apply in relation to the parties to a marriage, and to property belonging to the wife or husband whether or not by reason of an interest derived from the marriage, as it would apply if they were not married and any such interest subsisted independently of the marriage.
www.crimeupdate.net /crimebook/index.php?title=Theft_Act_1968   (4174 words)

  
 Theft Act   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
1.--(1) A person is guilty of theft if he dishonestly appropriates property belonging to another with the intention of permanently depriving the other of it; and 'thief' and 'steal' shall be construed accordingly.
7.-- A person guilty of theft shall on conviction on indictment be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years.
Whilst we use our best efforts to maintain the site, we are not responsible for the results of any defects that may be found to exist, or any lost profits or other consequential damages that may result from such defects.
www.car-crime.com /theft_act.htm   (1927 words)

  
 DEFINITION OF THEFT OF THE GREEK PARTHENON MARBLES BY THE BRITISH THUGS
Definition of Theft, as laid down in the Theft Act 1968 enacted by the British Parliament.
Analysis: Definition of Theft, as laid down in the Theft Act 1968 enacted by the British Parliament.
Responsible for the theft of the Greek Parthenon Marbles from Acropolis Athens, Greece.
chicago.agrino.org /definition_of_theft.htm   (1312 words)

  
 THEFT   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
To look at the interrelationship of each section of the Act and to be able to apply various elements of the Theft Act to fact situations.
A basic definition of theft is provided by section 1(1) of the Theft Act 1968 (TA).
Section 3(1) Any assumption by a person of the rights of an owner amounts to an appropriation, and this includes, where he has come by the property (innocently or not) without stealing it, any later assumption of a right to it be keeping or dealing with it as owner.
privatewww.essex.ac.uk /~joash/theft_act.htm   (2662 words)

  
 Essay: The first issue that arises here is A’s act of taking his father’s railway pas.. This could amount to theft. ...
Essay: The first issue that arises here is A’s act of taking his father’s railway pas..
The law on theft is laid under Section 1 of Theft Act 1968.
The first issue that arises here is A’s act of taking his father’s railway pas..
www.coursework.info /A2_and_A-Level/Law/The_first_issue_that_arises_here_is_A_s_act_L80829.html   (345 words)

  
 Change of Position? (AP Simester, 12 Jan 1998)
The case of voidable title arises (in this context) only if the mistake were induced by deception, etc; and that would be a different type of criminal offence.
In England, that would certainly be a sufficient interest for theft under the Theft Act 1968.
In Canada, however (unless the legislation has changed in the last couple of years?), theft requires either a taking or conversion, with intent to deprive the owner "or anyone with a special property or interest".
www.ucc.ie /ucc/depts/law/restitution/rdg/9801011.htm   (559 words)

  
 Guidance Note LA06 - Personal Licences
The personal licence is separate from the licence which authorises the premises to be used for the supply of alcohol or other licensable activities.
An offence under section 92(1) or (2) of the Trade Marks Act 1994 (c.26) (unauthorised use of trade mark, etc. in relation to goods) in circumstances where the goods in question are or include alcohol.
An offence under section 1 of the Trade Descriptions Act 1968 (c.29) (false trade description of goods) in circumstances where the goods in question are or include alcohol.
www.nelincs.gov.uk /business/licensing/la06.htm   (1455 words)

  
 Essay: 'Analyse the meaning of the words 'appropriation' and 'dishonesty' within the Theft Act 1968 - Coursework.Info
Essay: 'Analyse the meaning of the words 'appropriation' and 'dishonesty' within the Theft Act 1968
The Theft Act 1968 does not define dishonesty but it does provide certain situations in section 2 of the act where the person is not deemed dishonest.
Section 2(1)(a) provides that 'A person's appropriation of property belonging to another is not to be regarded as dishonest if he appropriates the property in the belief that he has
www.coursework.info /i/22713.html   (229 words)

  
 ENGLISH NATURE - Fungi and the Law
the Act recognises the custom of taking wild fruit and flowers, including fungi, and permits such action so long as there is no personal financial gain.
As "plants" include fungi and lichens on Schedule 8, it is clear that fungi are treated as plants for the purpose of this Act.
Areas of land which are Sites of Special Scientific Interest and National Nature Reserves under the Act have special protection which will have been made known to the landowner or occupier.
www.english-nature.org.uk /science/botany/plant9.htm   (361 words)

  
 Licensing Act 2003
An offence under the Firearms Act 1968 (c.
An offence under section 1 of the Trade Descriptions Act 1968 (c.
An offence under either of the following provisions of the Theft Act 1978 (c.
www.opsi.gov.uk /acts/acts2003/30017--p.htm   (691 words)

  
 Theft handout
Morris [1983] 3 All E.R. "...the concept of appropriation involves not an act expressly or impliedly authorised by the owner but an act by way of adverse interference with or usurpation of those rights" per Lord Roskill
Lawrence was a clear decision to the contrary since it laid down unequivocally that an act might be an appropriation notwithstanding that it was done with the consent of the owner.
The actual decision in Morris was correct but it was erroneous and unnecessary to indicate that an act expressly or impliedly authorised by the owner could never amount to an appropriation", per Lord Keith.
www.law.warwick.ac.uk /lawschool/crim/theft.html   (593 words)

  
 Motor Salvage   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-13)
theft or attempted theft of or from a motor vehicles, contrary to
The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 provides that certain convictions shall be regarded as 'spent' after specified periods of time have elapsed.
However you do need to disclose all convictions at the date you submit the signed and dated application form.
www.rochford.gov.uk /rochforddcinternet/main.asp?page=3498   (904 words)

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