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Topic: Theory of relativity


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In the News (Mon 20 Nov 17)

  
  Chapter 22. A Few Inferences from the General Theory of Relativity. Einstein, Albert. 1920. Relativity: The Special ...
Although a detailed examination of the question shows that the curvature of light rays required by the general theory of relativity is only exceedingly small for the gravitational fields at our disposal in practice, its estimated magnitude for light rays passing the sun at grazing incidence is nevertheless 1.7 seconds of arc.
Since it has often been contended by opponents of the theory of relativity that the special theory of relativity is overthrown by the general theory of relativity is overthrown by the general theory of relativity, it is perhaps advisable to make the facts of the case clearer by means of an appropriate comparison.
In the example of the transmission of light just dealt with, we have seen that the general theory of relativity enables us to derive theoretically the influence of a gravitational field on the course of natural processes, the laws of which are already known when a gravitational field is absent.
www.bartleby.com /173/22.html   (1210 words)

  
  Theory of relativity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Special relativity considers that observers in inertial reference frames, which are in uniform motion relative to one another, cannot perform any experiment to determine which one of them is "stationary".
This is known as the principle of relativity.
General relativity is a geometrical theory which postulates that the presence of matter "curves" spacetime, and this curvature affects the path of free particles (and even the path of light).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Theory_of_relativity   (503 words)

  
 General relativity - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It unifies special relativity and Isaac Newton's law of universal gravitation with the insight that gravitation is not viewed as being due to a force (in the traditional sense) but rather a manifestation of curved space and time, this curvature being produced by the mass-energy content of the spacetime.
In general relativity, phenomena that in classical mechanics are ascribed to the action of the force of gravity (such as free-fall, orbital motion, and spacecraft trajectories) are taken in general relativity to represent inertial motion in a curved spacetime.
General relativity was developed by Einstein in a process that began in 1907 with the publication of an article on the influence of gravity and acceleration on the behavior of light in special relativity.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/General_relativity   (5032 words)

  
 What is theory of relativity a definition from WhatIs.com
Albert Einstein's theory of relativity is actually two separate theories: his special theory of relativity, postulated in the 1905 paper, The Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies and his theory of general relativity, an expansion of the earlier theory, published as The Foundation of the General Theory of Relativity in 1916.
The special theory of relativity was based on two main postulates: first, that the speed of light is constant for all observers; and second, that observers moving at constant speeds should be subject to the same physical laws.
Relativity was a stunning concept at the time; scientists all over the world debated the veracity of Einstein's famous equation, E=mc2, which implied that matter and energy were equivalent and, more specifically, that a single particle of matter could be converted into a huge quantity of energy.
whatis.techtarget.com /definition/0,,sid9_gci554676,00.html   (593 words)

  
 Einstein, Albert. 1920. Relativity: The Special and General Theory
The Principle of Relativity (In the Restricted Sense)
On the Relativity of the Conception of Distance
The Space-Time Continuum of the General Theory of Relativity Is not a Euclidean Continuum
www.bartleby.com /173   (321 words)

  
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If the principle of relativity were not valid we should therefore expect that the direction of motion of the earth at any moment would enter into the laws of nature, and also that physical systems in their behaviour would be dependent on the orientation in space with respect to the earth.
The velocity of light relative to the liquid and the velocity of the latter relative to the tube are thus known, and we require the velocity of light relative to the tube.
This theory was of a purely electrodynamical nature, and was obtained by the use of particular hypotheses as to the electromagnetic structure of matter.
www.gutenberg.org /dirs/etext04/relat10.txt   (19921 words)

  
 Curious About Astronomy? The Theory of Relativity
The theory of relativity is perhaps the most successful development in the history of science in terms of its agreement with experimental results and its ability to predict new phenomena - only quantum mechanics can claim to compete with its success.
Einstein's theory immediately explained some of the major problems in the physics and astronomy of his day, and it has continued to explain new developments that were not even hinted at 90 years ago, including the existence of fl holes and recent observations in cosmology.
The theory of relativity is required whenever we study objects that are either (a) moving in a strong gravitational field, or (b) moving near the speed of light.
curious.astro.cornell.edu /relativity.php   (2857 words)

  
 Theory Of Relativity
Although the concept of relativity was not introduced by Einstein, his major contribution was the recognition that the speed of light in a vacuum is constant and an absolute physical boundary for motion.
Concerning the origin of the universe, Einstein's Theory of Relativity is the basis for the Big Bang Theory, a theory postulating on the origin of the universe.
Likewise, Darwin's Theory of Evolution is a theory focused on the origin of species and, ultimately, the origin of man. Yet, these two theories are often discussed as though they are two ends of a larger unified theory.
www.allaboutscience.org /theory-of-relativity.htm   (652 words)

  
 physics - Theory of relativity
Special relativity considers that observers in inertial reference frames which are in uniform motion relative to one another cannot perform any experiment to determine which one of them is in "absolute motion".
General relativity was published by Einstein in 1916 (submitted as a series of lectures before the Prussian Academy of Sciences November 25 1915).
General relativity is a geometrical theory which postulates that the presence of mass and energy "curves" spacetime, and this curvature affects the path of free particles (and even the path of light).
www.physicsdaily.com /physics/Theory_of_relativity   (504 words)

  
 General relativity
General relativity is a theory of gravitation and to understand the background to the theory we have to look at how theories of gravitation developed.
In 1907, two years after proposing the special theory of relativity, Einstein was preparing a review of special relativity when he suddenly wondered how Newtonian gravitation would have to be modified to fit in with special relativity.
From 1911 Einstein had realised the importance of astronomical observations to his theories and he had worked with Freundlich to make measurements of Mercury's orbit required to confirm the general theory of relativity.
www-groups.dcs.st-and.ac.uk /~history/HistTopics/General_relativity.html   (2006 words)

  
 The Theory of Relativity
Relativity is beyond the scope of this exposition, but it deserves at least a brief discussion.
Albert Einstein then proposed, in 1905, the "principle of relativity" as a fundamental property of the universe.
The relativity of time was demonstrated when it was found that muons--particles with a lifetime of about 2 microseconds--produced by fast atomic nuclei ("cosmic rays") high in the atmosphere, survived much longer and generally reached the Earth's surface, because in the frame of reference of the Earth, their lifetime seemed longer.
www-spof.gsfc.nasa.gov /stargaze/Srelativ.htm   (423 words)

  
 Millennium Theory of Relativity
The Millennium Theory of Relativity is a fundamental theory in relativistic physics.
Since light has a constant speed c relative to a moving source, yet somehow has that same speed relative to a stationary observer, it is incorrect to say that the speed of light is unaffected by the relative motion between the source and the observer.
Put simply, while light appears to maintain a constant speed c relative to the source, as viewed by an observer in the reference frame of the source, it appears to change its speed relative to the source, as viewed by an observer in a stationary frame of reference.
www.mrelativity.net /MRelativity/MillenniumTheory1.htm   (3873 words)

  
 Ether and the Theory of Relativity
This theory also called the theory of the stationary luminiferous ether moreover found a strong support in an experiment which is also of fundamental importance in the special theory of relativity, the experiment of Fizeau, from which one was obliged to infer that the luminiferous ether does not take part in the movements of bodies.
According to this theory the metrical qualities of the continuum of space-time differ in the environment of different points of space-time, and are partly conditioned by the matter existing outside of the territory under consideration.
The ether of the general theory of relativity is transmuted conceptually into the ether of Lorentz if we substitute constants for the functions of space which describe the former, disregarding the causes which condition its state.
www.tu-harburg.de /rzt/rzt/it/Ether.html   (2930 words)

  
 Theory Relativity in Mosaic Prayer
This is why his theory came to be known as the Theory of Relativity.
The first part, known as the Theory of Special Relativity, presented in 1905, included the establishing that the difference between mass and energy is a constant, that is, a number.
The theory's expanded part, presented in 1926, established that certain physical phenomena, especially those occurring on a cosmic scale, can only be understood if one admits that the presence of a body's mass curves the space around it.
www.bible-quotes-science-info.com /art/einstein-theory-relativity.htm   (1329 words)

  
 General Theory of Relativity
Yet another phenomenon predicted by general relativity is the time-delay effect, in which signals sent past the sun to a planet or spacecraft on the far side of the sun experience a small delay, when relayed back, compared to the time of return as indicated by classical theory.
The theory of relativity leads to the possibility that the universe is expanding; this is the most likely theoretical explanation of the experimentally observed fact that the spectral lines of all distant nebulae are shifted to the red; on the other hand the expanding-universe theory also supplies other possible explanations.
A relativistic electron theory was developed in 1928 by the British mathematician and physicist Paul Dirac, and subsequently a satisfactory quantized field theory, called quantum electrodynamics, was evolved, unifying the concepts of relativity and quantum theory in relation of the interaction between electrons, positrons, and electromagnetic radiation.
www.levity.com /mavericks/general.htm   (1301 words)

  
 The Theory of Relativity
The Theory of Relativity is widely accepted among the mainstream community of physicists and consequently by the general public as well.
Relativity is dependent on the notion that the measured speed of light is a constant in a vaccuum.
According to Relativity, if an object moves from a stationary point and travels at high speed away from its origin and then returns to the point of origin, there will be a quantifiable difference in the time experienced by objects in their respective reference frames.
www.fortunecity.com /skyscraper/terminus/935/relativity.html   (1883 words)

  
 Relativity Tutorial
According to relativity, this must be re-expressed as "The magnitude of the relative velocity between your car and the pavement must be less than 70 mph".
Special relativity was constructed to satisfy Maxwell's equations, which replaced the inverse square law electrostatic force by a set of equations describing the electromagnetic field.
Relativity also leads to interesting objects such as fl holes, but these are not very relevant to cosmology.
www.astro.ucla.edu /~wright/relatvty.htm   (3935 words)

  
 Relativity Theory
One of the achievements of Einstein’s general theory of relativity was precisely to develop geometry as an empirical science, the axioms of which are inferred from actual measurements, and which differ from the axioms of classical Euclidean geometry, which were (incorrectly) supposed to have been the products of pure reason, deduced from logic alone.
Relativity theory shows that such statement as "at one and the same place" and "at one and the same time" are, in fact, meaningless.
Einstein’s relativity theory firmly establishes that time and space do not exist in and of themselves, in isolation from matter, but are part of a universal interrelation of phenomena.
www.marxist.com /science/relativitytheory.html   (16160 words)

  
 Theory: Special Relativity (SLAC VVC)
Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity describes the motion of particles moving at close to the speed of light.
Einstein's theory is now very well established as the correct description of motion of relativistic objects, that is those traveling at a significant fraction of the speed of light.
One of the strangest parts of special relativity is the conclusion that two observers who are moving relative to one another, will get different measurements of the length of a particular object or the time that passes between two events.
www2.slac.stanford.edu /vvc/theory/relativity.html   (2962 words)

  
 Special Theory of Relativity
Relative to Sue, the light bulb is travelling to the left at half the speed of light.
Relative to Sue the light bulb, mirror, and detector are moving to left at half the speed of light.
Then relative to Sue the unmanned rocket is moving from left to right at 0.40 times the speed of light, which is noticeably larger than the common sense prediction of 0.75 - 0.50 = 0.25 times the speed of light.
www.upscale.utoronto.ca /GeneralInterest/Harrison/SpecRel/SpecRel.html   (9266 words)

  
 Einstein's Theory of Relativity - Scientific Theory or Illusion?
The main subject of this book is a critical analysis of the special theory of relativity as a scientific theory, which, above all, is concerned with questions connected with time, space, mass and energy and with the relationship between time and space, and mass and energy.
According to the theory of relativity time and space are mutually dependent and the contraction of space and the dilatation of time originate with motion as real physical processes.
In this way it is demonstrated that the special theory of relativity and the general theory of relativity, which is based upon the special theory of relativity, are only an unsuccessful attempt to generate a scientific theory.
users.net.yu /~mrp   (526 words)

  
 The Special Theory of Relativity and Theories of Divine Eternity
The special principle of relativity forbids us to regard the aether as composed of particles, the movements of which can be followed out through time, but the aether hypothesis as such is not incompatible with the special theory of relativity.
By invoking Relativity Theory at this point in his argument, Leftow is able to stave off the Eleatic conclusion that because God is changeless and there is no change relative to God, therefore motion and change are mere illusions masking a static reality.
The consequence of motion relative to the fundamental frame will be certain anisotropy effects produced by dynamical causes operating on the moving systems, primarily length contraction in the direction of motion in order that the internal equilibrium of the system might be maintained.
www.leaderu.com /offices/billcraig/docs/leftow.html   (7016 words)

  
 Einstein's Discovery of Relativity - John Stachel
Sometimes the case is presented in such a way as to suggest that it was the "philosophical concept" of the relativity of all motion, as Einstein once called it, which was the key step in his rejection of the ether.
In all of his struggles with the emission theory as well as with Lorentz's theory, he had been assuming that the ordinary Newtonian law of addition of velocities was unproblematic.
This is an example of how the special theory of relativity functioned as a theory of principle, limiting but not fixing the choice of a constructive theory of light.
www.aip.org /history/einstein/essay-einstein-relativity.htm   (6184 words)

  
 General relativity
General relativity is a theory of gravitation and to understand the background to the theory we have to look at how theories of gravitation developed.
In 1907, two years after proposing the special theory of relativity, Einstein was preparing a review of special relativity when he suddenly wondered how Newtonian gravitation would have to be modified to fit in with special relativity.
From 1911 Einstein had realised the importance of astronomical observations to his theories and he had worked with Freundlich to make measurements of Mercury's orbit required to confirm the general theory of relativity.
www-gap.dcs.st-and.ac.uk /~history/HistTopics/General_relativity.html   (1995 words)

  
 Physics: Albert Einstein Theory of Relativity: WSM in Absolute Space explains Albert Einstein's Theory of Relativity
The theory of relativity may indeed be said to have put a sort of finishing touch to the mighty intellectual edifice of Maxwell and Lorentz, inasmuch as it seeks to extend field physics to all phenomena, gravitation included.
The second principle, on which the special theory of relativity rests, is the 'principle of constant velocity of light in vacuo.' This principle asserts that light in vacuo always has a definite velocity of propagation (independent of the state of motion of the observer or of the source of the light).
According to the general theory of relativity space without ether is unthinkable; for in such space there not only would be no propagation of light, but also no possibility of existence for standards of space and time (measuring-rods and clocks), nor therefore any space-time intervals in the physical sense.
www.spaceandmotion.com /Physics-Albert-Einstein-Theory-Relativity.htm   (13222 words)

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