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Topic: Third Battle of Ypres


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In the News (Mon 19 Nov 18)

  
  Battlefield Tours Ypres and the Somme.
As a result of a series of attacks for which the German army command use the pick of their forces, several fierce battles are being fought at: Messines from October 12th, Langemark (October 21st -24th), Geluveld (October29,30, 31), Nonnenbossen, east of Hooghe (November 11th).
It marks the beginning of the agony of Ypres that was to endure for four years.
But after several bloody battles the crest of the Hill had to be abandoned to the Germans.
www.visit-ypres.be /battles.htm   (679 words)

  
  Third Battle of Ypres: Australian War Memorial
The Third Battle of Ypres was the major British offensive in Flanders in 1917.
It was planned to break through the strongly fortified and in-depth German defences enclosing the Ypres salient, a protruding bulge in the British front line, with the intention of sweeping through to the German submarine bases on the Belgian coast.
The battle comprised of a series of limited and costly offensives, often undertaken in the most difficult of waterlogged conditions - a consequence of frequent periods of rain and the destruction of the Flanders' lowlands drainage systems by intense artillery bombardment.
www.awm.gov.au /units/event_104.asp   (218 words)

  
  battles of Ypres - Encyclopedia.com
battles of Ypres three major engagements of World War I fought in and around the town of Ypres in SW Belgium.
The attack was unsuccessful and was broken off in May. The third battle of Ypres, popularly known as Passchendaele, began on July 31, 1917, and continued until November.
Modern-day Ypres, (Ieper in Flemish, or "Wipers" as the...
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Ypres-ba.html   (1153 words)

  
  World War Two
During the first battle of Ypres, starting in April of 1915, the newly put together Canadian army was a force to be reckoned with.
During the first battle of Ypres the Canadian army had to deal with such horrors as the introduction of the silent killer that was chlorine gas.
The battles of Ypres took place roughly during, October to November of 1914, April to May of 1915 and July to November of 1917 respectively.
www.angelfire.com /emo2/projecktww2/ypres.htm   (763 words)

  
 Third Battle of Ypres - Picture - MSN Encarta
Soldiers of an Allied machine gun company sit in crater holes of the devastated landscape around Ypres, Belgium.
The Third Battle of Ypres began in July 1917 and continued until November, when the Allies captured the Passchendaele (Passendale) Ridge.
The battle was a struggle in the mud of Belgium.
encarta.msn.com /media_681500216/Third_Battle_of_Ypres.html   (58 words)

  
 Ypres Home Page
Ypres a small Flemish market town, just over the border from France, quite similar to many towns in Belgium, that was until 1914 (the outbreak of the First World War).
The town of Ypres was the scene of some of the worst fighting of the war.
Ypres was described as being all the horrors of the Somme and the hell of Verdun.
www.users.globalnet.co.uk /~dccfarr   (248 words)

  
 Ypres at AllExperts
During the Middle Ages, Ypres was a prosperous town with a population of 80,000.
In the Second Battle of Ypres (April 22 to May 25, 1915) the Germans used poison gas for the first time on the Western Front (they had used it for the first time at the Battle of Bolimow on January 1, 1915) and captured high ground east of the town.
The largest, best-known, and most costly in human suffering was the Third Battle of Ypres (July 21 to November 6, 1916; also known as the Battle of Passchendaele) the British, Canadians and ANZAC forces recaptured the ridge at a terrible cost of lives.
en.allexperts.com /e/y/yp/Ypres.htm   (720 words)

  
 The educational encyclopedia, world war I, the great war, battles and battlefields
Somme: battle of the Somme the year 1916 was the year of the Battle of the Somme.
Ypres: second battle of Ypres the Ypres Salient was to be one of the most fought over areas of the whole war.
Ypres: battle of 3rd Ypres (Passchendaele) in 1915, at the second Battle of Ypres, the Germans used chlorine gas for the first time in warfare and succeeded in driving the British back to the town of Ypres
www.educypedia.be /education/worldwarIbattles.htm   (820 words)

  
 Battle of Passchendaele - WW1 Military - German Archive: The 1917 Battle of Passchendaele, also known as the Third ...
Battle of Passchendaele - WW1 Military - German Archive: The 1917 Battle of Passchendaele, also known as the Third Battle of Ypres, was one of the major battles of World War I, fought by British, ANZAC, and Canadian soldiers against the German army.
Because of the Third Battle of Ypres there were insufficient reserves available to exploit the success at the Battle of Cambrai, the first breakthrough by massed tanks, that restored somewhat the shaken confidence of the British government in the final victory.
These battles, and those British and Commonwealth soldiers who gave their lives, are commemorated at the Menin Gate Memorial in Ypres, the Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, and at the Tyne Cot Cemetery, the largest Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemetery in the world with nearly 12,000 graves.
www.germannotes.com /archive/article.php?products_id=169&osCsid=9360cd4cdba51f6b4a4199890f76180b   (1731 words)

  
 The Dispatch - Serving the Lexington, NC - News
The 1917 Battle of Passchendaele, also known as the Third Battle of Ypres or simply Third Ypres, was one of the major battles of World War I, fought by British, ANZAC and Canadian soldiers against the German Army.
Because of the Third Battle of Ypres there were insufficient reserves available to exploit the Allied success at the Battle of Cambrai, the first breakthrough by massed tanks, that restored somewhat the shaken confidence of the British government in the final victory.
These battles, and those British Empire soldiers who gave their lives, are commemorated at the Menin Gate Memorial in Ypres, the Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing, and at the Tyne Cot Cemetery, the largest Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemetery in the world with nearly 12,000 graves.
www.the-dispatch.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Passchendale   (2254 words)

  
 battle of ypres   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Battle of Ypres and the Battle of the Yser marked the end of the Race to the Sea where the Germans tried to reach the French Channel ports of Calais and Dunkerque, which were the main supply routes for the British Expeditionary Force.
The town of Ypres was rapidly demolished by artillery and air attack during the Battle of Ypres.
The third Battle of Ypres was known as Battle of Passchendaele.
www.worldwar1-history.com /Battle-of-Ypres.aspx   (633 words)

  
 Ypres: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library   (Site not responding. Last check: )
During the Middle Ages, Ypres was one of the most powerful towns of Flanders, with a flourishing cloth industry that rivaled those of Ghent and Bruges.
Ypres has frequent train service that connects to...reach most of the World War I cemeteries in the Ypres area, a car is necessary, but one is not always...
The first battle of Ypres (Oct. Nov., 1914) was the last of the series of engagements referred to as "the race for the sea." The...
www.questia.com /library/encyclopedia/ypres.jsp   (1798 words)

  
 First World War.com - Battles - The Third Battle of Ypres, 1917
Whereas the first and second battles of Ypres were launched by the Germans in 1914 and 1915 respectively, Third Ypres was intended as Sir Douglas Haig’s Allied forces breakthrough in Flanders in 1917.
The Third Battle of Ypres was opened by Sir Hubert Gough’s Fifth Army, with 1 Corps of Sir Herbert Plumer’s Second Army joining on its right and a corps of the French First Amy led by Anthoine to its left: a total of twelve divisions.
This was followed by the Battle of Polygon Wood on 26 September and the Battle of Broodseinde on 4 October.
www.firstworldwar.com /battles/ypres3.htm   (1470 words)

  
 [No title]
Meticulously planned, Third Ypres was launched on 31 July 1917 and continued until the fall of Passchendaele village on 6 November.
Today commonly referred to simply as ‘Passchendaele’, the tactics employed at the Third Battle of Ypres are as controversial as those executed at the Battle of the Somme a little over a year earlier, and was the final great battle of attrition of the war.
Haig himself argued that when regarded as a battle of attrition, the German forces could less afford the loss of men than the Allies, who by this time were being supplemented by the entry into the war of the U.S. This view is shared by a number of German contemporaries.
www.strategypage.com /militaryforums/512-30672.aspx   (1508 words)

  
 3rd Ypres, they called it Passchendaele
Known as the battle of Passchendaele, the third battle of Ypres was the collective name given to campaign that lasted until November 1917 aimed at capturing the Gheluvelt Plateau in southern Belgium.
In 1917, the area of Flanders to the east of Ypres had great strategic importance because it was dominated by a German occupied ridge from the East to the South of Ypres.
Haig's plan was to strike out of Ypres to the North and East and, in conjunction with a seaborne landing on the coast of Belgium at Nieuport, he would capture the high ground at Passchendaele which was the key to the whole area.
www.diggerhistory.info /pages-battles/ww1/france/3rd_ypres.htm   (3459 words)

  
 Third Ypres: Battle of Langemarck 16/17 August 1917
The action in which John Robinson was killed was one of the series of battles that took place in Flanders in the summer and autumn of 1917, which collectively is known as the Third Battle of Ypres.
Third Ypres was supposed to have as its strategic aim the liberation of the Belgian Channel ports and their denial to U-boat operation.
The water table of the Ypres salient turned into the sea of mud and blood that became known as Passchendaele, after the village that crowns the horseshoe of ridges that lie to the east of Ypres.
freespace.virgin.net /sh.k/3rdypres.html   (1006 words)

  
 The Great War . Maps & Battles . The Third Battle of Ypres | PBS
This would be the third battle at Ypres, the other two having taken place in 1914, and 1915.
The initial advance ended successfully, but then weeks passed before the British troops were ordered to continue by which time the wettest fall in years had set in.
In this three-month battle, men, animals and equipment were swallowed up in mud that was often like quicksand, Haig's ambitious plan became yet another failure.
www.pbs.org /greatwar/maps/maps_ypres.html   (176 words)

  
 third battle of ypres
The battle itself was focused on the small town of Passchendaele.
The ground on which the troops had to fight was getting increasingly muddy due to the artillery's destruction in the ancient drainage systems that kept the land dry.
The battle was going well until the eve of August 1, when heavy rains began and flooded over the area even worse than before.
www.geocities.com /Athens/Acropolis/2354/ypres3.html   (363 words)

  
 Third Battle of Ypres, 21 July- 6 November 1917
The first battle of Ypres took place as a 'meeting engagement' during the 'Race to the Sea' where the Allied and German armies tried to find an open flank to exploit, with the British and German forces meeting head on the axis of the Menin Road.
Finally, in the battles for Poelcappelle and Passchendaele (First and Second), the attackers (who were by this time exhausted) fought their way onto Passchendaele Ridge in appalling conditions, with the Canadians taking the village on 6 November 1917.
The Battle of the Lys, is sometimes called the fourth battle of Ypres and occurred during the German spring offensive in which the Allies lost ground around the town, including Mount Kemmel to the south, but retained control of Ypres itself.
www.historyofwar.org /articles/battles_ypres3.html   (1036 words)

  
 The Galloping 8th - Battlefields
The Battle of the Ancre (tenth phase of the Battle of the Somme 1916)
The Battle of Broodseinde (fifth phase of the Third Battle of Ypres)
The Battle of Poelcapelle (sixth phase of the Third Battle of Ypres)
www.galloping8th.com /Battlefields.html   (169 words)

  
 First World War.com - Battles - General Sir John Davison on the Third Battle of Ypres, 1917
The Third Battle of Ypres - commonly referred to simply as a 'Passchendaele' - is commonly cited today as an example (along with the July 1916 Battle of the Somme) of British Commander-in-Chief Sir Douglas Haig's enormously costly attritional war strategy.
It is interesting to note that this view of the battle was widely expressed by Haig's contemporaries and is not in fact a modern perspective.
Fortunately the weather improved in September and the 10th ushered in the third period with a British attack on a wide front.
www.firstworldwar.com /battles/ypres3davidson.htm   (870 words)

  
 The Flanders Offensive, 7 June - 10 November 1917 (Third Ypres, Passchendaele)
Their defence involved a considerable strain on the troops occupying them, and they were certain to be costly to maintain against a serious attack, in which the enemy would enjoy all the advantages in observation and in the placing of his artillery.
In the summer of 1917, however, as larger forces would be at my disposal, and as, in the Somme battle, our new Armies had proved their ability to overcome the enemy's strongest defences, and had lowered his power of resistance, I considered myself justified in undertaking it.
Later (his memoirs being written after Haig was dead and unable to defend himself) he said that the battle "with the Somme and Verdun, will always rank as the most gigantic, tenacious, grim, futile and bloody fights ever waged in the history of war".
www.1914-1918.net /bat20.htm   (1395 words)

  
 Third Ypres: A Decisive Victory?
It is worthy of note that plans for the Ypres Offensive included consideration of the possibility of an amphibious assault on the coast of Belgium.
Ludendorff himself acknowledged this point after the British victory in the Battle of the Menin Road Ridge on September 20th.(9) One consistent source of alarm for the Germans was the fate of the majority of their counter-attacks, destroyed by artillery fire before they had even had time to form up.
It was to reach these positions that the final operations of Third Ypres were carried out, culminating in the capture of Passchendaele by the Canadians on 10th November.
www.lib.byu.edu /estu/wwi/comment/_gpypres.html   (2553 words)

  
 Passchendaele Anniversary Tour - the Third Battle of Ypres
We shall then study all the battles in sequence and in context, with special emphasis on the improved tactics of the British Army in 1917.
The battle opened on 31 July 1917 and the real nature of the German defensive scheme was revealed.
Battle of Pilkem Ridge 31 July and the failures of August when British morale hit rock bottom.
www.holts.co.uk /ht132.html   (414 words)

  
 Battle of Ypres   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Second Battle of Ypres (April 22 – May 15, 1915)
Third Battle of Ypres (July 31 – November 6, 1917) (also known as Passchendaele)
Fourth Battle of Ypres (September 28 – October 2, 1918) (also known as the Battle of Ypres 1918)
www.xasa.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/b/ba/battle_of_ypres.html   (85 words)

  
 THIRD YPRES
In 1914 Ypres was an innocent victim of the advancing German army as it fought its way through Belgium and on into France.
The Third Battle of Ypres was part of this plan, as was the Battle of Messines, which in June 1917, made significant Allied gains to the south of Ypres.
August there was continuous rain and the Third Battle of Ypres, which had started so well for the Allies, began to deteriorate into hopeless, floundering mud.
www.spoulton.fsnet.co.uk /Book/Ypres.htm   (4877 words)

  
 G.P. Ypres
The Battle of Third Ypres had its origins in the critical juncture of events that occurred in early 1917;
In 1915 Haig had met representatives of the Ministry of Munitions,requesting that they supply the BEF with "a lighter machine gun, with tripod and gun in one part...Mobility is most important." Indeed, legends to the contrary aside, Haig had been an advocate of the Machine Gun since his experience in the Sudan in 1898.
One consistent source of alarm for the Germans was the failure in their defensive tactics and the fate of the majority of their counter-attacks, destroyed by artillery fire before they had even had time to form up.
www.lib.byu.edu /~rdh/wwi/comment/gpypres.html   (3043 words)

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