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Topic: Thomas Hobbes


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  Island of Freedom - Thomas Hobbes
Thomas Hobbes was an English philosopher, scientist, and political theorist.
Hobbes made three visits to the continent in his life, the first in 1610 which included discussions with Francis Bacon, under whose influence Hobbes became dissatisfied with Aristotelianism.
Hobbes saw philosophy as a necessary preliminary to rational government and the avoidance of civil war.
www.island-of-freedom.com /HOBBES.HTM   (933 words)

  
  Thomas Hobbes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Hobbes was educated at Westport church from the age of four, passed to the Malmesbury school and then to a private school kept by a young man named Robert Latimer, a graduate from Oxford University.
Hobbes was exposed to European scientific and critical methods during the tour in contrast to the scholastic philosophy which he had learned in Oxford.
According to Hobbes, society is a population beneath an authority, to whom all individuals in that society covenant just enough of their natural right for the authority to be able to ensure internal peace and a common defense.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Thomas_Hobbes   (3790 words)

  
 Thomas Hobbes
According to Hobbes, society is a population beneath an authority, to whom all individuals in that society surrender just enough of their natural right for the authority to be able to ensure internal peace and a common defense.
Hobbes' leviathan state is infinitely authoritative in matters pertaining to aggression, one man waging war on another, or any matters pertaining to the cohesiveness of the state.
Thomas Hobbes was born at Westport, Wiltshire on April 5, 1588.
www.knowledgefun.com /book/t/th/thomas_hobbes.html   (3392 words)

  
 [No title]
Thomas Hobbes, then, whose life I write, was second son of Mr Thomas Hobbes, vicar of Charlton and Westport next to Malmesbury, who married Middleton of Brokenborough (a yeomanly family), by whom he had two sons and one daughter.
Thomas, the father, was one of the ignorant 'Sir Johns, of Queen Elizabeth's time; could only read the prayers of the church and the homilies; and disesteemed learning (his son Edmund told me so), as not knowing the sweetness of it.
Thomas Hobbes of Malmesbury, philosopher, was born at his father's house in Westport, being that extreme house that points into, or faces, the Horse-Fair; the farthest house on the left hand as you go to Tedbury, leaving the church on your right.
socserv2.socsci.mcmaster.ca /~econ/ugcm/3ll3/hobbes/life   (5057 words)

  
 Thomas Hobbes - MSN Encarta
Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), English philosopher and political theorist (see Political Theory), one of the first modern Western thinkers to provide a secular justification for the political state.
The philosophy of Hobbes marked a departure in English philosophy from the religious emphasis of Scholasticism.
Developing his politics and ethics from a naturalistic basis of self-interest (see Naturalism; Egoism), Hobbes held that since people are fearful and predatory they must submit to the absolute supremacy of the state, in both secular and religious matters, in order to live by reason and gain lasting preservation.
encarta.msn.com /encnet/refpages/RefArticle.aspx?refid=761571920   (669 words)

  
 BBC - History - Thomas Hobbes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) was one of the most influential of all political philosophers.
When Thomas Hobbes published Leviathan in 1651, he set a model for the understanding of the nature, purpose and justification of government, according to principles which could for the first time be characterised as 'scientific'.
Hobbes was born in the Wiltshire town of Malmesbury where his father, Thomas senior, was a curate.
www.bbc.co.uk /history/state/monarchs_leaders/hobbes_01.shtml   (399 words)

  
 Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679).
At the age of 15, Hobbes was taken on by a rich and influential Cavendish family, as a tutor.
It was a fortunate appointment for young Hobbes as the family had a "superb library" and connections to certain other leading lights of the age, whom he was to meet, including Francis Bacon (1561-1626) and Galileo (1564-1642).
To Hobbes, man's nature does not require a governing state, independent of his own, however, a better life might well be assured through the existence of an outside governing state.
www.blupete.com /Literature/Biographies/Philosophy/Hobbes.htm   (1570 words)

  
 Hobbes's Moral and Political Philosophy
Hobbes is famous for his early and elaborate development of what has come to be known as “social contract theory”, the method of justifying political principles or arrangements by appeal to the agreement that would be made among suitably situated rational, free, and equal persons.
Hobbes terms this situation “the condition of mere nature”, a state of perfectly private judgment, in which there is no agency with recognized authority to arbitrate disputes and effective power to enforce its decisions.
Hobbes argues that each of us, as a rational being, can see that a war of all against all is inimical to the satisfaction of her interests, and so can agree that “peace is good, and therefore also the way or means of peace are good”.
plato.stanford.edu /entries/hobbes-moral   (3028 words)

  
 Thomas Hobbes - Philosopher - Biography
Thomas Hobbes was born at Westport, adjoining Malmesbury in Wiltshire, on April 5, 1588.
Hobbes comes to the conclusion that humanity's natural condition is a state of perpetual war, constant fear, and lack of morality.
Hobbes saw the responsibility of governments to be the protection of people from their own selfishness, and he thought the best government would have the power of a sea monster, or leviathan.
www.egs.edu /resources/hobbes.html   (1348 words)

  
 Life of Thomas Hobbes
Thomas Hobbes was born as the second son of the vicar of Westport and Charlton (Wiltshire) England in April of 1588—reportedly prematurely because of the stress created by the news of the approaching Spanish Armada.
Hobbes later considered it a sign that he was born under: the burden of fear and the consequent passion for peace.
Hobbes was a rationalist, building his arguments on deductive design, at a time in which English science was moving more closely toward the empirical method of truth-building, that is, using inductive methods to validate hypotheses.
www.luminarium.org /sevenlit/hobbes/hobbesbio.htm   (1579 words)

  
 Pre-History of Cognitive Science--Thomas Hobbes
Hobbes' model is based upon an application of the rules of geometry and physics to the human sciences.
As noted earlier, Hobbes states specifically that all things, including thoughts, are material; however, his model of cognition still predicates a strange type of division between the individual thinking subject and the rest of the material world; for, according to Hobbes we never actually experience the true materiality of the thing we sense.
Hobbes devotes an entire chapter to language and its right usage, during which he espouses an interesting model of the function of language in political society (Chapter 4) -one in which metaphorical language is specifically derided.
www.rc.umd.edu /cstahmer/cogsci/hobbes.html   (976 words)

  
 Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) - By Miles Hodges   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Thomas Hobbes called for an-all powerful sovereign (the "Leviathan") who would serve the interests of the larger political community (i.e., England) by holding it tightly together under his sovereign authority--in order to curb the kind of human wantonness experienced in the Wars of Religion.
For Hobbes such powerful rule was not to be founded on the ancient rule of "divine rights" of monarchs--but on the basis of the needs, even rights, of the community to be served by such an all-powerful ruler.
Thomas Hobbes was born as the second son of the vicar of Westport and Charlton (Wiltshire) England in April of 1588--reportedly prematurely because of the stress created by the news of the approaching Spanish Armada.
www.newgenevacenter.org /biography/hobbes2.htm   (1594 words)

  
 Thomas Hobbes : A Short Biography
Thomas Hobbes was born in London in 1588.
Hobbes believed in the rule of a king because he felt a country needed an authority figure to provide direction and leadership.
In fact, Hobbes came up with the phrase "voice of the people," which meant that one person could be chosen to represent a group with similar views.
www.rjgeib.com /thoughts/nature/hobbes-bio.html   (479 words)

  
 The Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes
Thomas Hobbes (picture) was born in Malmesbury in 1588.
Thomas Hobbes wrote one great philosophical work, which he divided into sections and published at three different times: De cive (On the Social and Political Organism), a work that was further developed and later published under the title The Leviathan; De corpore (On the Body); and De homine (On Man).
Thus Hobbes believed that he had saved science as an absolute value, even though such a value is only phenomenal, being an operation of the mind and not an objective contact with external reality.
www.radicalacademy.com /philfthomashobbes.htm   (1040 words)

  
 Quodlibet Online Journal: The Physical Philosophy of Thomas Hobbes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Throughout Hobbes' entire physical philosophy "motion" is defined as local motion between two corporealities and thus is limited to the influence of the corporeal agent upon the corporeal "patient".
In Hobbes' system the civil sovereign is such over all civil affairs and thus the ideal church is a State church answerable to its head, the civil sovereign.
It is clear that Hobbes' treatment of religious issues stems primarily from a consistent adherence to his fundamental definition of philosophy as physics and the physiological epistemology which results.
www.quodlibet.net /hobbes.shtml   (1386 words)

  
 Philosophy Thomas Hobbes Leviathan: Discussion of Quotes Thomas Hobbes Leviathan
Hobbes' model is based upon an application of the rules of geometry and physics to the human sciences.
As noted earlier, Hobbes states specifically that all things, including thoughts, are material; however, his model of cognition still predicates a strange type of division between the individual thinking subject and the rest of the material world; for, according to Hobbes we never actually experience the true materiality of the thing we sense.
Hobbes devotes an entire chapter to language and its right usage, during which he espouses an interesting model of the function of language in political society (Chapter 4) -one in which metaphorical language is specifically derided.
www.spaceandmotion.com /Philosophy-Thomas-Hobbes-Leviathan.htm   (3673 words)

  
 The Galileo Project
Hobbes advanced a secular philosophy which insisted, inter alia, on the subjection of church to state.
Hobbes composed De corpore, one of the early mechanistic natural philosophies, in the late 30s; it was ultimately published in 1655.
Hobbes' support in Paris is not wholly clear; he remained there until 1651, when he returned to England.
galileo.rice.edu /Catalog/NewFiles/hobbes.html   (887 words)

  
 Economics 3LL3 - Hobbes
Thomas Hobbs of Malmsbury, intituled, A treatise of liberty and necessity.
Hobbes his last animadversions, in the case concerning liberty, and universal necessity, wherein all his exceptions about that controversie are fully satisfied.
Ward, 1656, In Thomae Hobbii philosophiam exercitatio epistolica...
socserv.socsci.mcmaster.ca /~econ/ugcm/3ll3/hobbes   (3215 words)

  
 Thomas Hobbes
The natural law philosopher Thomas Hobbes lived during some of the most tumultuous times in European history -- consequently, it should be no surprise that his theories were thoroughly pessimistic regarding human nature.
Hobbes came into the orbit of Mersenne's circle once again and, for some of time, served as the mathematics tutor of a young, fugitive prince who would later become King Charles II.
Hobbes is thus one of the progenitors of "legal positivism", i.e.
cepa.newschool.edu /het/profiles/hobbes.htm   (1815 words)

  
 Thomas Hobbes -- Moral and Politcal Philosophy [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy]
Nonetheless, this does not mean that Hobbes was able to reach a level of "scientific" certainty in his judgments that had been lacking in all previous reflection on morals and politics.
Hobbes provides a series of powerful arguments that suggest it is extremely unlikely that human beings will live in security and peaceful cooperation without government.
Hobbes frames the issues in terms of an older vocabulary, using the idea of natural law that many ancient and medieval philosophers had relied on.
www.iep.utm.edu /h/hobmoral.htm   (9740 words)

  
 BBC - Radio 4 - In Our Time - Greatest Philosopher - Thomas Hobbes
Left to its own devices, what Hobbes called the 'state of nature', mankind would undertake a "war of everyone against everyone" in which individual lives would be "solitary, nasty, brutish and short".
Hobbes solution was strong government, the leviathan of his title, against which individuals had no rights and no authority.
Hobbes was a royalist and felt a monarchy to be the ideal leviathan but he was attacked by other royalists for undermining the divine right of Kings which claimed that kingly authority derived from God.
www.bbc.co.uk /radio4/history/inourtime/greatest_philosopher_thomas_hobbes.shtml   (498 words)

  
 Thomas Hobbes
The philosophy of Thomas Hobbes is perhaps the most complete materialist philosophy of the 17th century.
Hobbes rejects Cartesian dualism and believes in the mortality of the soul.
Aubrey's A Brief Life of Thomas Hobbes is an account of Hobbes by one of his contemporaries.
oregonstate.edu /instruct/phl302/philosophers/hobbes.html   (781 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Leviathan: With Selected Variants from the Latin Edition of 1668: Books: Thomas Hobbes,Edwin Curley   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Hobbes is also one of those misunderstood authors who are portrayed as being cold and ruthless, but are simply trying to provide their readers with an accurate and analytic account of humanities problems and hopefully providing solutions.
Hobbes believes that the interest of the ruler and the interest of his subjects are so interdependent that the actions of the ruler will always be in the interest of his people.
To Hobbes, these wars for independence must be irrational: for one, the colonized people could be enjoying many benefits either from direct aid or commercial links with their colonizer; additionally, hundreds of thousands of colonized people might die in the immediate war or during the consequent internal power struggles caused by the revolt.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0872201775?v=glance   (3192 words)

  
 Philosophers : Thomas Hobbes   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Hobbes developed a materialist and highly pessimistic philosophy that was denounced in his own day and later, but has had a continuing influence on Western political thought.
His Leviathan (1651) presents a bleak picture of human beings in the state of nature, where life is "nasty, brutish, and short." Fear of violent death is the principal motive that causes people to create a state by contracting to surrender their natural rights and to submit to the absolute authority of a sovereign.
Although the power of the sovereign derived originally from the people, Hobbes said-challenging the doctrine of the divine right of kings-the sovereign's power is absolute and not subject to review by either subjects or ecclesiastical powers.
www.trincoll.edu /depts/phil/philo/phils/hobbes.html   (146 words)

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