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Topic: Tibetan Buddhist canon


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In the News (Thu 18 Jul 19)

  
  THDL: Tibetan Buddhist Canon: The Kangyur (bka’ ’gyur) and Tengyur (bstan ’gyur)
The Tibetan Buddhist Canon is one of the three most important canons of Buddhist literature in the world, and hence one of its most important bodies of religious literature.
The Tibetan canon is arguably the most complete of all three versions, and represents in many cases the sole surviving versions of Indian scriptures (in translation).
The canon thus forms one of the two or three most important tools for understanding the nature and history of both Indian Buddhism and Tibetan Buddhism, including exoteric and esoteric philosophy and ritual, ethics, literature, social practice, institutional history, narrative history, and much else.
www.thdl.org /xml/show.php?xml=/collections/literature/kangteng/kangteng.xml   (590 words)

  
  Tibetan Buddhism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Tibetan Buddhism — formerly also called Lamaism, after their religious gurus known as lamas — is the body of religious Buddhist doctrine and institutions characteristic of Tibet and the Himalayan region.
Certain Buddhist scriptures arrived in southern Tibet from India as early as 173 CE during the reign of Thothori Nyantsen, the 28th king of Tibet.
Tibetan Buddhism exerted a strong influence from the 11th century CE among the peoples of Central Asia, especially in Mongolia and Manchuria.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Tibetan_Buddhism   (1663 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Tibetan Buddhist canon
Tibetan Buddhism —; formerly also called Lamaism, after their religious gurus known as lamas — is the body of religious Buddhist doctrine and institutions characteristic of Tibet and the Himalayan region.
In addition to earlier foundational Buddhist texts from early Buddhist schools, mostly the Sarvastivada, and mahayana texts, the Tibetan canon includes Tantric texts.
Tibetans became familiar with the mandala early in their introduction to Buddhist art and culture, a process begun with the first ruler of the historical period, Songtsen Gampo (srong-btsan sgam-po, d.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Tibetan-Buddhist-canon   (1042 words)

  
 The Art of Healing: A Tibetan Buddhist Perspective
Tibetan symbols and rituals, whose ultimate purpose is to mobilize the bodhicitta (aspiration to attain enlightenment in order to free all sentient beings from suffering) in the individual, generate not only cognitive considerations but also encompass subjective meaning for the spiritual, emotional and sensual spheres.
To the Tibetan, the inevitability of suffering and illness is a reflection of the fact that we are born.
Tibetan Buddhist art has transcendental implications which are "conveyed through the formal language of symbols, colors, gestures, and attributes [and] cause hidden chords to resonate in the depths of our being" (Birnbaum, p.78).
www.dharma-haven.org /tibetan/tibetan-art-of-healing.htm   (3531 words)

  
 Buddhist - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about Buddhist
Buddhist iconography, painting, and architecture spread from northwestern India to China and East Asia from the 1st century onwards.
The only surviving complete canon of the Buddhist scriptures is that of the Sinhalese (Sri Lanka) Buddhists, in Pāli, but other schools have essentially the same canon in Sanskrit.
The most important Theravāda Buddhist festival is Wesak, commemorating the birth, enlightenment, and death of the Buddha, while in Japan, Mahāyāna Buddhists celebrate the birth of the Buddha with the festival of Hara Matsuri.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /Buddhist   (1510 words)

  
 Buddhist texts
Buddhists place varying value on texts: attitudes range from worship of the text itself, to dismissal of texts as falsification of the ineffable truth.
The latter are the various commentaries on canonical texts, other treatises on the Dharma as well as collections of quotes, histories, grammars, etc. However it should be remembered that any divisions are arbitrary, and that there will always be texts that cross boundaries, or that belong in more than one category.
Different schools, however, are not always in agreement on which texts are canonical, and the various recensions of the Buddhist Canon contain widely varying numbers and types of texts.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/b/bu/buddhist_texts.html   (4425 words)

  
 Tibetan Buddhist canon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Two Indian Buddhist scholars are widely considered to be of paramount importance by Tibetan Buddhists.
The further Tibetan commentaries they use differ by school, although since the 19th century appearance of the widely renowned scholars Jamgon Kongtrul and Ju Mipham, Kagyupas and Nyingmapas use many of the same Tibetan commentaries as well.
Also of great importance are the "Five Treatises of Maitreya." These texts are said to have been related to Asanga by the Buddha Maitreya, and comprise the heart of the Yogachara (or Cittamatra, Mind-Only) school of philosophy in which all Tibetan Buddhists are well-versed.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Tibetan_Buddhist_canon   (979 words)

  
 Tibetan Buddhism - ReligionFacts
Tibetan Buddhism (sometimes called Lamaism) is the form of Mahayana Buddhism that developed in Tibet and the surrounding Himalayan region beginning in the 7th century CE.
Tibetan Buddhism is most well-known to the world through the office of the Dalai Lama, the exiled spiritual and political leader of Tibet and the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989.
Tibetan Buddhism spread to the West in the second half of the 20th century as many Tibetan leaders were exiled from their homeland.
www.religionfacts.com /buddhism/sects/tibetan.htm   (2694 words)

  
 Tibetan Buddhism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Dharma protectors are mythic figures incorporated into Tibetan Buddhism from various sources (including the native Bön religion, and Hinduism) who are pledged to protecting and upholding the Dharma.
Certain Buddhist scriptures arrived in southern Tibet from India as early as 173 AD during the reign of Thothori Nyantsen, the 28th king of Tibet.
Tibetan Buddhism exerted a strong influence from the 11th century AD among the peoples of Central Asia, especially in Mongolia and Manchuria.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/tibetan_buddhism   (1117 words)

  
 THDL: Tibetan Buddhist Canon: The Kangyur (bka’ ’gyur) and Tengyur (bstan ’gyur)
Buddhist literature constitutes one of the world’s greatest premodern literary heritages and covers a broad range of topics – religious, philosophical, historical, sciences, and much else.
Moreover, Tibetan “reprints,” whether manuscripts or xylographs, generally alter the pagination of the original text, while editors, scribes and wood block carvers also often significantly alter the text itself during the process of their work.
Tibetan texts lack tables of contents by which one can easily differentiate and locate their individual sections, such that the cataloging of their internal structure with precise page-line references provides an invaluable resource for searching and navigation.
www.thdl.org /xml/show.php?xml=/collections/literature/kangteng/kangteng.xml&div=thdl_kt_03_01   (2143 words)

  
 The Mandala in Tibet   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Tibetan paintings on cloth (thang-ka) dating as early as the eleventh or twelfth centuries feature highly complex mandalas.
Earlier Mahayana Buddhist literature had emphasized the bodhisattva, one who strove to assist others in the attainment of enlightenment and whose religious career was often described as prajnaparamita, "the perfection of wisdom," for it involved the cultivation - over many lifetimes - of wisdom, compassion, generosity, and similar qualities.
Many such texts, crucial to the identification and interpretation of the mandala, were translated into Tibetan from Sanskrit and can be found in a portion of the Tibetan Buddhist canon known as the Tanjur (bstan-'gyur).
www.asianart.com /mandalas/tibet.html   (524 words)

  
 Crazy Wisdom and Tibetan Teaching Tales Told by Lamas
The effulgent, fertile void of sunyata is the cosmic womb, the fundamental ground of being, the unborn and undying mother of all the Buddhas.
Tibetan Buddhism is an enhancement and further development of the original teachings actually spoken by the historical Buddha, and common to all Buddhist schools.
Tibetan historians of old regarded the ancient, pre-Buddhist storytellers and singing bards as protectors of the kingdom, citing the fact that the correct recitation of legends of origin was a religious act, necessary for upholding the order of the world and of society.
www.buddhistinformation.com /tibetan/crazy_wisdom_and_tibetan_teachin.htm   (9336 words)

  
 Tibetan Singing Bowl   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Tibetans, when questioned about the use of the bowls, are vague, saying that the bowls are simply vessels for food — as indeed they have mostly become.
It has been found that among the wave patterns of different tibetan singing bowls there is a measurable wave pattern that is equivalent to the alpha waves and/or theta waves produced by the brain.
Resting the tibetan singing bowl upon the palm of your hand will usually enable you to appreciate the experience to a greater depth than placing the bowl on a pad or sandbag on a tabletop when using the mallet.
www.himalayanmart.com /tibetansingingbowl/tibetansingingbowl.php   (915 words)

  
 Buddhism / buddhist texts / tibetan buddhist canon
The Tibetan Buddhist canon is a loosely defined list of sacred texts recognized by various sects of Tibetan Buddhism.
In addition to earlier foundational Buddhist texts from early Buddhist schools, mostly the Sarvastivada, and mahayana texts, the Tibetan canon includes Tantric texts.
The further Tibetan commentaries they use differ by school, although since the 19th century appearance of the widely renowned scholars Jamgon Kongtrul and Ju Mipham, Kagyupas and Nyingmapas use many of the same Tibetan commentaries as well.
www.buddhism-guide.com /buddhism/tibetan_buddhist_canon.htm   (928 words)

  
 Tibet
TIBETAN BUDDHISM IS REMARKABLE for having preserved until the 20th century the unbroken tradition of the monastic universities of northern India, a tradition which, since the Chinese invasion of 1959, has been transplanted to India and many Western countries.
The Indian universities and their Tibetan counterparts stressed a synthesizing approach to Buddhism, in which an attempt was made to categorize and incorporate all previous doctrines and practices, reconciling all differences in a universal system that covered all aspects of the Dharma-Vinaya.
He vigorously persecuted the Buddhists in his realm, until he too was assassinated (in 842) by a Buddhist monk who wished to preserve the Dharma from further attack.
www.quangduc.com /English/tibetan.html   (3128 words)

  
 American University Library Media Services Department: Religion Collections in Libraries and Archives: (Main Reading ...
This Tibetan Canon has been microfilmed from the 209 volumes deposited at the Library of Congress and is contained on 2,226 microfiche.
The original wood-blocks from which this edition was printed were carved at the Tibetan monastery at Cone, Kansu, Western China, during the 18th century.
The original Sanskrit texts were collected, translated, and arranged in the categories of the present Tibetan Canon between the 10th and the 17th centuries.
www.loc.gov /rr/main/religion/amu.html   (219 words)

  
 Tibetan Buddhism - China-related Topics TI-TL - China-Related Topics
Tibetan Buddhism, (formerly also called Lamaism after their religious gurus known as lamas), is the body of religious BuddhismBuddhist doctrine and institutions characteristic of Tibet and the HimalayasHimalayan region.
Certain Buddhist scriptures arrived in southern Tibet from India as early as 173 CE during the reign of Thothori Nyantsen, the 28th king of Tibet.
Tibetan Buddhism exerted a strong influence from the 11th century CE among the peoples of Central Asia, especially in Mongolia and Manchuria.
www.famouschinese.com /virtual/Tibetan_Buddhism   (1213 words)

  
 Buddhist Scriptures: The Tibetan Canon
The Tibetan Canon which consists of two parts: (1) the bKángjur ("Translation of the Word of the Buddha"), pronounced Kanjur, and (2) the bStan-'gyur ("Translations of the Teachings") pronounced Tanjur.
The first Tibetan edition of the canon was at sNar-tang with the Kanjur appearing in 1731, followed by the Tanjur in 1742.
Their inclusion in this part of the Tibetan Canon is perhaps justified on the acceptance of the position that they are necessary aids and accompaniments in the practice of the religion.
www.buddhanet.net /e-learning/history/s_tibcanon.htm   (324 words)

  
 Buddhist Scriptures: The Canon
Hence we speak of a Pali Canon, i.e., the literature of the Sthaviravadins which is believed to be the original word of the Buddha.
In place of the division into ‘canonical groups’ of Sutra, Abhidharma and Vinaya, this new arrangement seems to reckon with a live and continuous tradition in accepting as authoritative both the Sutra (or words of Buddha) and Sastra (or commentaries, treatises, etc. of disciples of a later date).
It becomes clear from the foregoing analysis that in speaking of a Buddhist Canon one has to admit that it is both vast in extent and complex in character.
www.buddhanet.net /e-learning/history/s_canon.htm   (680 words)

  
 Buddhism in Mongolia After 1990   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
A traditional Buddhist education, however, was not possible, as it was forbidden to study Buddhist philosophy and dialectics, the core subjects of higher Tibetan Buddhist education.
Buddhist treatises and prayers for everyday use are increasingly being translated into Modern Khalkh Mongolian, abandoning Classical Tibetan as the language of the religious.
The translation of Buddhist texts into the Mongolian language may be interpreted as an indication that Mongolian Buddhism in the twentieth century is determined to adapt to the challenges of a modern, secularized society, seeking its own way apart from the pressure of the traditional, conservative Tibetan dGe-lugs-pa clergy.
www.tibetan-museum-society.org /java/arts-culture-Buddhism-in-Mongolia-After-1990.jsp   (4313 words)

  
 The Korean Buddhist Canon: A Descriptive Catalogue
As the centuries passed for the Chinese Buddhists, hundreds of texts were translated from Sanskrit into Chinese and in addition there developed a sizable corpus of literature composed of the writings of learned and inspired monks and nuns within China.
When the canonic material was finally available through the imprint from these blocks, a different but extremely important task was begun by one of the famous monks of that period.
Xylographs from these blocks have played a major role in the modern editions of the Buddhist canon, serving as the basis for three versions of the canon published in Japan: Shukusatsu zōkyō, printed during the years of 1880-85,40 the Manji zōkyō, printed 1902-05,41 the Zoku zōkyō42 and the Taisho shinshū daizōkyō, 1924-34.
www.hm.tyg.jp /~acmuller/descriptive_catalogue/front.html   (5365 words)

  
 Tibetan Studies Room Background   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
While most of the world's religions have canonical literature that is contained within a single canon, the Buddhist canon is not.
The Tibetan Studies Room houses over 400 volumes of Tibetan Buddhist canon (sometimes referred to as Tibetan scrolls) as well as the collected works of some of the most important masters from all of the major Tibetan Buddhist schools.
The core collection, the canon, donated by the Hagerty and Duggan families, is a collection of the most important Indian Buddhist texts translated from the Sanskrit into Tibetan.
www.library.ucsb.edu /libwaves/feb02/tibetan.html   (291 words)

  
 Religious Studies Department Faculty and Staff   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
He is currently transferring his Tibetan canonical database onto the web with Columbia University and the University of Virginia.
He's been a practitioner of Tibetan Buddhism since the mid-70's and was ordained as a Buddhist Minister in 1999.
She lectures and writes on Tibetan Buddhism, women and Buddhism, Buddhist-Christian dialogue, and American Buddhism, and is an Acharya (senior dharma teacher) in the Shambhala Buddhist tradition.
www.naropa.edu /religiousstudies/facultystaff.html   (1078 words)

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