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Topic: Timeline of Quebec history


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In the News (Tue 16 Jul 19)

  
  Indiana Local History and Genealogy Research Guide
It boldly addresses Native American and slavery issues which arose during this era of Indiana's history, while not neglecting the simple, day-to-day lifestyles of the early settlers, as related by those who lived during this era.
Alerding, Herman J. A History of the Catholic Church in the Diocese of Vincennes.
History of Allen County, Indiana, with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of some of its Prominent Men and Pioneers, to Which is Appended maps of its Several Townships and Villages
home.att.net /~Local_History/IN_History.htm   (3653 words)

  
  CalendarHome.com - - Calendar Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Quebec, then called Canada, formed part of the colonial empire of New France until the Seven Years' War, when it was conquered by Great Britain; the 1763 Treaty of Paris formally transferred the colony to British possession.
Quebec's highest mountain is Mont D'Iberville, which is located on the border with Newfoundland and Labrador in the northeastern part of the province.
The avian emblem of Quebec is the snowy owl.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /cgi-bin/encyclopedia.pl?p=Quebec   (4621 words)

  
  Quebec City, Quebec   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Quebec City is served by Jean Lesage International Airport, which is located in the borough of Sainte-Foy.
Quebec City was captured by the British in 1629 and held until 1632.
In April 2001, Quebec City hosted the Summit of the Americas to discuss the Free Trade Area of the Americas; it also hosted massive anti-globalization demonstrations, provoked both by the summit and by the decision to wall off a large portion of the historic city with a four-metre-high chain-link fence for the duration.
www.bidprobe.com /en/wikipedia/q/qu/quebec_city__quebec.html   (894 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Quebec (pronounced "kweh-BECK" or "keh-BECK"; French: le Québec) is a Canadian province with a population of 7,455,208 (Statistics Canada, 2002), primarily speakers of the French language making up the bulk of the Francophone population in North America.
Quebec is located in eastern Canada, bordered by Ontario and Hudson Bay to the west, Atlantic Canada to the east, the United States (Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and New York) to the south and the Arctic Ocean to the north.
Until 1968 the Quebec legislature was bicameral, consisting of the Legislative Council and the Legislative Assembly.
www.online-encyclopedia.info /encyclopedia/q/qu/quebec.html   (1038 words)

  
 Jean Charest   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Born in Sherbrooke, Quebec, he worked as a lawyer from 1981 until he was elected Progressive Conservative member of Parliament for Sherbrooke in the 1984 election.
In the 1998 Quebec election, the Liberals received more votes than the incumbent Parti Québécois, but because the Liberal vote was concentrated in fewer ridings, the PQ won enough seats to form another majority government.
Quebec: He lost the 1998 election and won the 2003 election.
www.1-free-software.com /en/wikipedia/j/je/jean_charest.html   (405 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Quebec City, Quebec Article   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Quebec City is served by Jean Lesage International Airport, which is located in the borough of Sainte-Foy.
Quebec City was captured by the British in 1629 and held until 1632.
In April 2001, Quebec City hosted the Summit of the Americas to discuss the Free Trade Area of the Americas; it also hosted massive anti-globalization demonstrations, provoked both by the summit and by the decision to wall off a large portion of the historic city with a four-metre-high chain-link fence for the duration.
fav.ipedia.com /quebec_city__quebec.html   (951 words)

  
 Timeline of Quebec history (1900 to 1930) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This section of the Timeline of Quebec history concerns the events relating to the province of Quebec, Canada between the beginning of the 20th century and the Westminster statute.
1912 - The Parliament of Canada passes Quebec Boundaries Extension Act that extends the northern boundary of the province of Quebec to Hudson Strait.
All provinces follow suit by 1922 except Quebec, which does not give women the right to vote in provincial elections until 1940.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Timeline_of_Quebec_history_(1900_to_1930)   (545 words)

  
 Parti Québécois   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The 1980 Quebec referendum on sovereignty association was rejected by 60 per cent of voters.
With the failure of the Charlottetown Accord and the Meech Lake Accord, the question of Quebec's status remained unresolved and the PQ called the 1995 Quebec referendum proposing negotiations on sovereignty.
The current Bloc leader, Gilles Duceppe, is also the son of Jean Duceppe, an famous Quebec actor that helped found the PQ and the New Democratic Party branch in Quebec (now separated from the federal NDP and merged in the Union des Forces Progressistes).
www.1-free-software.com /en/wikipedia/p/pa/parti_quebecois.html   (721 words)

  
 Timeline of Quebec history (1663 to 1759) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This section of the Timeline of Quebec history concerns the events relating to the Quebec portion of New France between the establishment of the Sovereign Council and the fall of Quebec.
1704 - February 29 - Deerfield Massacre : French forces from Quebec and Native American forces under the command of Jean-Baptiste Hertel de Rouville attacked the village of Deerfield, Massachusetts.
1720 - Quebec City is fortified by the King of France.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Timeline_of_Quebec_history_(1663_to_1759)   (1083 words)

  
 Louis-Alexandre Taschereau - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Born into a landholding aristocracy of one of Quebec's elite French-Canadian families, Louis-Alexandre Taschereau emerged as the leading champion of the industrialization of Quebec.
A pioneer in advocating the exploitation of the huge hydraulic potential the waterways of the new Quebec, Taschereau understood the limited capital available in a sparsely populated Canada, and actively tried to bring in American investment and expertise.
Newspaper and verbal attacks against the Jewish population were frequent and often vicious in a press that saw the move by Taschereau to revamp the confessional school system as an example of Jews seeking to undermine Christianity.
www.butte-silverbow.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Louis-Alexandre_Taschereau   (656 words)

  
 Quebec City, Quebec - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Quebec City (officially, Québec), is the capital of the Canadian province of Quebec.
Quebec's Old Town (Vieux Québec), the only North American fortified city north of Mexico whose walls still exist, was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1985.
Major General Isaac Brock fortifed Quebec City by strengthening the walls and building an elevated artillery battery prior to the War of 1812.
www.lexington-fayette.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Quebec_City,_Quebec   (1146 words)

  
 National Assembly of Quebec - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The original Quebec legislature was bicameral, consisting of the Legislative Council and the Legislative Assembly.
Quebec's territory is divided into 125 electoral districts (ridings).
Normally, the leader of the political party with the largest number of elected candidates is asked by the Lieutenant-Governor of Quebec to form the government as Premier, or Prime Minister.
www.butte-silverbow.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/National_Assembly_of_Quebec   (835 words)

  
 Quebec Act
The Quebec Act of 1774 was an act by the British Parliament setting out procedures of governance in the area of Quebec.
The Quebec Act entrenched French language rights, the old French civil law and officially recognized the Roman Catholic Church, including its right to impose taxes; however, criminal law remained British and based on the common law.
As well, the act changed the boundaries of Quebec by including some of the colonies to the south, where the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers met, and lands to the north, between the Great Lakes and Rupert's Land.
www.guajara.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/q/qu/quebec_act.html   (478 words)

  
 Comte de Frontenac   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Timeline of Quebec history (1663 to 1759) Timeline of Quebec history concerns the events between the establishment of the Treaty of Utrecht (1713).
Timeline of Quebec City is fortified by the King, Monseigneur Laval, royal commissioner Louis Gaudais-Dupont and 150 colonists and craftmen on September 15.
Timeline of Quebec history 1608 to 1662 1663 to 1759 1760 to 1773 This section of the Great Peace of Montreal on May 15.
hy54.mmshy.com /comtedefrontenac.html   (818 words)

  
 Liberal Party of Quebec   (Site not responding. Last check: )
It traditionally supports Canadian federalism, as opposed to Quebec sovereignty, and the role of government in the economy, although in recent years its economic policies have moved towards neoliberalism.
The Liberals were in opposition to the ruling Quebec Conservative Party for most of the first 20 years after Confederation, except for 18 months of Liberal minority government in 1878-1879.
Relations soured between the Quebec Liberal Party and the federal Liberal Party of Canada under Lesage, and particularly under Robert Bourassa.
www.bidprobe.com /en/wikipedia/l/li/liberal_party_of_quebec.html   (1032 words)

  
 QUEBEC GENERAL ELECTION, 1966 FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Quebec general election of 1966 was held on June_5, 1966, to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of Quebec, Canada.
In terms of the number of seats won, the election was one of the closest in recent history, with the UN winning 56 seats to the Liberals' 50.
Generally, Quebec's first_past_the_post electoral system tends to produce strong disparities in the number of seats won even if the popular vote is fairly close.
www.witwib.com /Quebec_general_election,_1966   (259 words)

  
 Quebec general election, 1962 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Quebec general election of 1962 was held on November 14, 1962, to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Quebec, Canada.
The incumbent Quebec Liberal Party, led by Jean Lesage, won re-election, defeating the Union Nationale (UN), led by Daniel Johnson, Sr.
In an unusual move, the election was called just two years after the previous 1960 general election.
www.sevenhills.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/1962_Quebec_election   (273 words)

  
 Union Nationale - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
It notably held power in Quebec uninterrupted from 1944 to 1960, under the leadership of Premier Maurice Duplessis.
The Union Nationale was strongly aligned with the clergy in the province, and dominated Quebec politics during the Duplessis years using repressive measures such as the Padlock Law to suppress opposition and particularly the trade unions.
Mounting demands for Quebec's independence from Canada had resulted in the nationalist vote moving towards the new separatist Parti Quebecois, winner of the 1976 election.
www.bexley.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Union_Nationale   (723 words)

  
 Dictionary ti   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Timeline of U.S. attack on Afghanistan in December 2001
Timeline of U.S. attack on Afghanistan in November 2001
Timeline of U.S. attack on Afghanistan in October 2001
www.dictionarydefinition.net /ti.html   (146 words)

  
 Quiet Revolution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
From the late 1930s to 1959, the political, educational, economic and social spheres of Quebec were controlled by the fiercely conservative Maurice Duplessis, leader of the Union Nationale.
Electoral fraud and corruption were commonplace in Quebec, with the Church openly campaigning for the Union Nationale with slogans such as Le ciel est bleu, l'enfer est rouge (Heaven is blue, hell is red - referring to the colours of the Union Nationale (blue) and the Liberals (red)).
In case of divorce, the rules for administering the were retained using Quebec's old Community property matrimonial regime until 1980 when the new legislation brought an automatic equal division of certain basic family assets between the spouses.
www.sevenhills.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Quiet_Revolution   (1416 words)

  
 [No title]
In the 1998 Quebec election, the Quebec Liberals received more votes than the PQ, but because the Liberal vote was concentrated in fewer ridings, the PQ won enough seats to form another majority government.
National Assembly of Quebec as they had won in the previous election in 1994, in which the Liberals had been led by Daniel Johnson, Jr.
Quebec: He lost the 1998 election and won the 2003 election as leader of the Quebec Liberal Party.
en-cyclopedia.com /wiki/Jean_Charest   (465 words)

  
 Quebec City, Quebec   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Quebec City (officially, ''Québec''), is the capital of the CanadaCanadian province of Quebec.
The thinness of the strait between Quebec City and Levis, QuebecLévis on the opposite shore give the city and consequently the province its name (''kebek'' is an Algonquian/ word for "narrow passage").
Quebec City is served by Jean Lesage International Airport, which is located in the borough of Sainte-Foy, QuebecSainte-Foy.
www.infothis.com /find/Quebec_City,_Quebec   (1070 words)

  
 Discover the Wisdom of Mankind on Quebec   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Quebec (pronounced or) (French: Québec, pronounced) is the largest province in Canada and the second most populous, after Ontario, with a population of 7,598,100 (Statistics Canada, July 2005).
Quebec is located in eastern Canada, bordered by Ontario and Hudson Bay to the west, Atlantic Canada to the east, the United States (Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and New York) to the south and the Arctic Ocean to the north.
Fearful that the French-speaking population of Quebec would side with the rebels of the 13 other colonies to the south, in 1774, the British Parliament passed the Quebec Act that paved the way to official recognition of the French language and French culture.
www.blinkbits.com /blinks/quebec   (3659 words)

  
 Oka Crisis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The town planned to build a golf course over a burial ground and sacred grove of birch trees near the Mohawk town of Kanesatake, resulting in the Mohawks blockading a road.
In an initial confrontation between the Sûreté du Québec and the Mohawks, a police officer was killed.
The ensuing standoff and crisis caused a confrontation between the police, the Canadian Forces that had been requisitioned by the government of Quebec in "aid of the civil power" and the Mohawk tribe.
www.pineville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Oka_crisis   (262 words)

  
 [No title]
Quebec (pronounced "keh-BECK"; French: le Québec) is the largest province in Canada geographically, and the second most populous, second to Ontario, with a population of 7,509,928 (Statistics Canada, 2004).
The capital is Quebec City and the largest city is Montréal.
Quebec Act that helped ensure the survival of the French language and French culture in the region.
en-cyclopedia.com /wiki/Quebec   (1482 words)

  
 Canadian Genealogy and History Links - Quebec
McCord Museum Searchable collection of historical photographs, for the purpose of increasing awareness of the social history and material culture of Canada, Quebec and Montreal, from the 18th century to the present.
A Social History of the Dutch in Quebec The history of people of Dutch origin in the province of Quebec in terms of settlement patterns, immigration experience, economic and socio-cultural development and integration.
Hebridean Scots of the Province of Quebec Emigrants from the Western Isles of Scotland in the 19th century.
www.islandnet.com /~jveinot/cghl/quebec.html   (0 words)

  
 Lake Champlain and Lake George History Timeline- Discovery and Exploration 1609-1645
A chronological history of the region in greatly-expanded book form.
"Champlain left Quebec on board a pinnace accompanied by a small party of followers, and ascended the St. Lawrence as far as the mouth of the Richelieu, passed up that stream to the foot of the rapids near
The first white man to see the lake- Samuel de Champlain, died in Quebec.
www.historiclakes.org /Timelines/timeline1.html   (0 words)

  
 Maine History Timeline
He becomes the first popularly elected independent governor in the history of the United States.
This timeline was adapted from information from the State of Maine.
For a more complete U.S. History Timeline, click here.
www.mainehistory.info /timeline.html   (691 words)

  
 Texas Department of State Health Services, Public Health Preparedness, History   (Site not responding. Last check: )
From the beginning of history, records are replete with examples of biological or chemical materials being used in warfare.
Historical incidents of biological warfare or biological agent use with the intent of causing harm in the 20th century are roughly grouped on the timeline.
On September 7, Bulgarian exile Georgi Markov, in London, was injected in the leg with a steel ball impregnated with ricin via a specially constructed umbrella.
www.dshs.state.tx.us /preparedness/bioterrorism/public/history   (5650 words)

  
 eLexi - das Onlinelexikon   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Timeline of quantum mechanics, molecular physics, atomic physics, nuclear physics, and particle physics
Timeline of states of matter and phase transitions
Timeline of the 2001 anthrax attacks in New York
www.elexi.de /index_en/index_ti.html   (244 words)

  
 Quebec general election, 1939   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Quebec general election of 1939 was held on October 25, 1939 to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Quebec, Canada.
The Quebec Liberal Party, led by former premier Adélard Godbout, defeated the incumbent Union Nationale, led by Maurice Duplessis.
History of the World History of the United States History of Europe Ancient History History Military History
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/Q/Quebec-general-election,-1939.htm   (221 words)

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