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Topic: Timeline of the French Revolution


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  French Revolution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The French Revolution (1789-1799) was a period in the history of France.
The Concordat of 1801 between Napoleon and the Church ended the dechristianisation period and established the rules for a relationship between the Catholic Church and the French State that lasted until it was abrogated by the Third Republic via the separation of church and state on December 11, 1905.
Louis XVI, opposed to the course of the revolution, but rejecting the potentially treacherous aid of the other monarchs of Europe, cast his lot with General Bouillé, who condemned both the emigration and the assembly, and promised him refuge and support in his camp at Montmedy.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/French_Revolution   (5252 words)

  
 French Revolution/Napoleon Bonaparte Time Line
French clergy gave no taxes to the government, but they gave a free gift, which was about 2 percent of their income.
However the slow advance of the French armies to the north in Germany and the danger of being cut off in the rear caused him to arrange the truce of Leoben in April of 1797.
French Victories on land - Treaty of Pressburg - In 1805, due to Austria’s defeat at Austerlitz, Napoleon Bonaparte signed a peace treaty with Francis II, the Holy Roman Emperor and Emperor of Austria, in the town of Pressburg (what is now Bratislava, Slovakia).
members.fortunecity.com /tsbarton/timeline.htm   (7310 words)

  
 French Revolution - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The period of the French Revolution is very important in the history of France and the world.
Legislation enacted in 1790 included the abolition of the Church's authority to levy a tax on crops known as the "dîme," the cancellation of special privileges for the clergy, and the confiscation of Church property, the then largest landowner in the country.
The Concordat of 1801 between the National Assembly and the Church ended the dechristianisation period and established the rules for a relationship between the Catholic Church and the French State that lasted until it was abrogated by the Third Republic on the separation of church and state on December 11, 1905.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/French_Revolution   (5061 words)

  
 French Revolution — Infoplease.com
French Revolution: Effects of the Revolution - Effects of the Revolution The French Revolution, though it seemed a failure in 1799 and appeared...
French Revolution: Factionalism and War - Factionalism and War On Oct. 1, 1791, the Legislative Assembly convened.
French Revolution: The Republic - The Republic On Sept. 21, 1792, the Convention held its first meeting.
www.infoplease.com /ce6/history/A0819666.html   (258 words)

  
 French Revolution
The period of the French Revolution in the history of France covers the years between 1789 and 1799, in which republicanss overthrew the monarchy and the Roman Catholic Church perforce underwent radical restructuring.
This period saw the rise of the political "clubs" in French politics, foremost among these the Jacobin Club: according to the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica, by August 10, 1790 already one hundred and fifty-two clubs had affiliated with the Jacobins.
The French people were in no temper to be dictated to by foreign monarchs, and the threat of force merely resulted in the militarization of the frontiers.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/f/fr/french_revolution_1.html   (4034 words)

  
 French Revolution : French revolution   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The French Revolution comprises a period in the History of France, covering the years 1789-1799, in which the monarchy was overthrown and radical restructing was forced upon the Roman Catholic Church.
The French system of absolute monarchy which mingled with a large and growing middle class that had absorbed the ideology of equality and freedom of the individual brought about by such philosophes[?] as Voltaire, Denis Diderot, Turgot, and other theorists of the Enlightenment.
On November 9, 1799 Napoleon staged a coup which led to his dictatorship and eventually to his proclamation as emperor, which brought the specifically republican phase of the French Revolution to a close.
www.termsdefined.net /fr/french-revolution.html   (1396 words)

  
 Station Information - French Revolution
When the Estates-General convened in Versailles on May 5, 1789 amidst general festivities, there was an immediate hint that what had appeared to many in the Third Estate as a revolution already peacefully accomplished was less than it appearedsham.
That first day was to provide only a hint, with the etiquette of 1614 strictly enforced, the clergy and nobility in their full regalia, the physical locations of the deputies from the three estates dictated by the protocol of an earlier era.
On July 27, 1794, the French people revolted against the excesses of the Reign of Terror in what had become known as the Thermidorian Reaction.
www.stationinformation.com /encyclopedia/f/fr/french_revolution_1.html   (3548 words)

  
 timeline
At the age of Fifteen, Marie was wed to Louis XVI, heir to the French throne.
The years of rule by the moderates gave way, however, after the assassination of the heir to the throne in 1820, to rule by the ultra-Royalists, and the accession of Charles X in 1824 brought an ultra-Royalist to the throne.
French citizens rose against their monarch, Louis XVI, eliminated the ancient legal distinctions based on social class, and established a republican government.
www.geocities.com /axi0nes/timeline.html   (4688 words)

  
 French Revolution --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Hence the conventional term “Revolution of 1789,”; denoting the end of the ancien régime in France and serving also to distinguish that event from the later French revolutions of 1830 and 1848.
The revolution was precipitated by Charles X's publication (July 26) of restrictive ordinances contrary to the spirit of the Charter of 1814.
The inability of France to feed its huge peasant population was a leading cause of the French Revolution.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9035357?source=RSSOTD   (806 words)

  
 French Revolution
The French Revolution is a period in the History of France, covering the years 1789-1799, in which the monarchy was overthrown and radical restructing was forced upon the Roman Catholic Church.
On November 9, 1799 Napoleon staged a coup which led to his dictatorship and eventually to his proclamation as emperor, which brought the republican phase of the French Revolution to a close.
The French Revolutionary Calendar (or Republican Calendar) was introduced in France on 24 November 1793 and abolished on 1 January 1806.
faculty.ucc.edu /egh-damerow/french_revolution.htm   (1210 words)

  
 Timeline of the French Revolution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
June 20: Third Estate/National Assembly are locked out of meeting houses by royal decree; the Third Estate chooses to continue despite decree and decides upon a declarative vow, known as the "serment au Jeu de Paume" (The Tennis Court Oath), not to dissolve until the constitution has been established
June 23: Two companies of French guards mutiny in the face of public unrest
July 2-July 13: Battle of the Vosges (French victory on the Rhine)
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Timeline_of_the_French_Revolution   (1132 words)

  
 FrenchRevolutionTimeline_Pg3_ECore_RDO
The Civil Constitution of the Clergy(1789)- passed July 12, 1790 during the French Revolution, subordinated the Roman Catholic Church in France to the French government.
During the French Revolution, he was a moderate, favored a constitutional monarchy built on the model of Great Britain, and conducted secret negotiations with the king in order to reconcile the monarchy and the revolution, an effort that failed.
The Girondists were more a group of individuals holding certain opinions and principles in common than an organized political party, and the name was at first somewhat loosely applied to them owing to the fact that the most brilliant exponents of their point of view were deputies from the Gironde.
www.geocities.com /ryanoberman/FrenchRevolutionTimeline_Pg3_ECore_RDO.html   (712 words)

  
 French Revolution - InfoSearchPoint.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The French system of absolute monarchy collided with a large and growing middle class that had absorbed the ideology of equality and freedom of the individual, brought about by such philosophers as Voltaire, Denis Diderot, Turgot, and other theorists of the Enlightenment.
Extravagant expenditures by Louis XIV on luxuries such as Versailles were compounded by heavy expenditures on the Seven Years War and the American War of Independence.
The poor conditions in the countryside had forced rural residents to move into Paris, and the city was overcrowded and filled with the hungry and disaffected.
www.infosearchpoint.com /display/French_Revolution   (1880 words)

  
 New Page 1
French Victories on Land- he had attacked the Martello towers to have victory on land.
King Frederick William III (1797-1840)- was the king of Prussia when they fought against France in the French Revolution.
French Retreat (Oct 19, 1812)- when the French where walking home after the failure of taking over Moscow.
members.cox.net /ericinthegroove/frechrevotimeline.htm   (3165 words)

  
 Week 2 - Tocqueville
Tocqueville has answers to some basic questions about revolution, social change, the nature of the state, and the role of ideas, and we will be coming back to his arguments in each of these areas as the semester progresses.
Second, he argues that the revolution was essentially a natural result of a specific social order (for which reason he believes it worthwhile to study the Old Regime rather - at least initially - than the course of the Revolution itself).
Third, the entity that was affected by the Revolution was the French monarchy, the French state.
www.people.fas.harvard.edu /~fannion/gov97b/week02.htm   (888 words)

  
 Revolution: The Call to Battle - World History lesson plan (grades 9-12) - DiscoverySchool.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
A revolution may be fought by volunteers, not professional soldiers, who are committed to the principles of the war.
Context: Because the American Revolution was fought for principles that resulted in the formation of a nation based on democratic ideals, most scholars consider the conflict a revolution rather than a war.
Context: While the French Revolution did not result in a democratic government, it did end the autocratic rule of the monarchy and strengthen the standing of the French middle class.
school.discovery.com /lessonplans/programs/revolution_calltobattle   (848 words)

  
 bastille revolution - Books, journals, articles @ The Questia Online Library
That the Bastille is a collective...of the French Revolution 3 are dedicated to the Bastille as a matter of...the eve of the Revolution in 1789, the demonized Bastille had as a matter...
THE FRENCH REVOLUTION AND THE LONDON...period of the Revolution and the Napoleonic...fall of the Bastille he took over...these scenes of revolution were followed...Liberty; or, The Bastille at the Royal...
That was one aspect of the influence of the French Revolution on the course of European history.
www.questia.com /SM.qst;jsessionid=FD0Z2Hvjd2JFpzw1PdvKCt2sJ89t2KNkJs5fqshlqTlp6G2ZNT2b!630609619!303383468?act=search&keywordsSearchType=1000&keywords=bastille-revolution   (1665 words)

  
 French Revolution - TvWiki, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
During the French Revolution (1789-1799) democracy and republicanism replaced the absolute monarchy in France, and the French sector of the Roman Catholic Church was forced to undergo radical restructuring.
The Concordat of 1801 between Napoleon and the Church ended the dechristianisation period and established the rules for a relationship between the Catholic Church and the French State that lasted until it was abrogated by the Third Republic on the separation of church and state on December 11, 1905.
Louis XVI, opposed to the course of the revolution, but rejecting the potentially treacherous aid of the other monarchs of Europe, cast his lot with General Bouillé, who condemned both the emigration and the assembly, and promised him refuge and support in his camp at Montmedy.
www.tvwiki.tv /wiki/French_Revolution   (5030 words)

  
 French Revolution   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The period of the French Revolution in the history of France covers the years between 1789 and 1799, in which democrats and republicans overthrew the absolute monarchy and the Roman Catholic Church perforce underwent radical restructuring.
Proto-revolutionary activity started when the French king Louis XVI (reigned 1774 – 1792) faced a crisis in the royal finances.
During the régimes of Louis XV (ruled 1715 – 1774) and Louis XVI several different ministers, including Turgot and Jacques Necker, unsuccessfully proposed to revise the French tax system to tax the nobles.
french-revolution.kiwiki.homeip.net   (4202 words)

  
 Katalog Stron » Katalog » Society » History » By Time Period » Eighteenth Century » ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
France During the French Revolution and Under Napoleon Bonaparte - An annotated chronology of civil and military events.
The Parisian Stage During the French Revolution - A research project by professors at the University of Chicago whose goal was to list all plays that were performed in Paris during the French Revolution.
Revolution and After - "Tragedies and Farces" of the French Revolution and post-revolution periods.
katalog.otserv.pl /Society/History/By_Time_Period/Eighteenth_Century/French_Revolution   (357 words)

  
 The French Revolution - Timeline Index
The French Revolution was one of the most influential and significant events in world history; it continues to fascinate people two centuries after the people of France rebelled against their rulers.
The French Revolution was not just a revolt against the regime of the Bourbon Kings; it embodied an entire new way of viewing the world and human society.
Louis XVI was King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then King of the French in 1791-1792.
www.timelineindex.com /content/view/588   (180 words)

  
 Revolutionary War Timeline
Christine Swager researched this timeline and based it on Lumpkin, Henry.
This is the turning point of the Revolution, as British troops never recovered from this defeat.
French Naval Fleet engages British Fleet on the Chesapeake Bay.
www.nps.gov /cowp/Timeline.htm   (2127 words)

  
 American Revolution - Revolutionary War Timeline
The British fleet retreats to New York for reinforcements, leaving the French fleet in control of the Chesapeake.
The French fleet establishes a blockade, cutting Cornwallis off from any retreat by sea.
French cannons bombard Cornwallis and his 9000 men day and night while the Allied lines slowly advance and encircle them.
www.americanrevolution.com /Timeline.htm   (2249 words)

  
 French Revolution chronology
The rulers of Austria and Prussia agree to halt the French Revolution.
Lafayette deserts the army and the Revolution and flees to Austria.
In Paris, rumors abound of imminent invasion, the collapse of the Revolution, and of conspiracies mounted by imprisoned aristocrats.
www.unlv.edu /faculty/gbrown/hist462/resources/chrono.htm   (5200 words)

  
 Spy Letters of the American Revolution -- Timeline
The French and Indian War was a part of the Seven Years War (1756-1763), an imperial struggle between England, France and Spain.
American troops, under the leadership of General John Sullivan, and the French troops, led by the Marquis de Lafayette, withdrew as Clinton sent a great number of men and ships to Rhode Island.
Comte de Rochambeau landed in Newport, Rhode Island with a strong naval fleet and 5,000 French troops to assist the patriots' cause.
www.si.umich.edu /spies/timeline.html   (3060 words)

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