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Topic: Timurid Empire


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  Timurid Empire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Flag of the Timurid Empire according to the Catalan Atlas c.1375
The Timurid Empire (1370–1506) was founded by Timur (ruled 1370–1405), who conquered much of central and southwest Asia, and it was built up by his descendents (see Timurid dynasty).
The empire was taken over by his son Miran Shah, but he passed away in 1407.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Timurid_Empire   (277 words)

  
 Search Results for "Timurid"
The Timurid dynasties ruled until the invasion of Uzbek tribes early in the...
Thousands of artisans and religious scholars were deported to Samarkand, the Timurid capital in central Asia, leaving the urban economy of Syria in a...
With the breakup of the Timurid empire, the city passed to the khanate of Kokand.
www.bartleby.com /cgi-bin/texis/webinator/sitesearch?FILTER=&query=Timurid   (304 words)

  
 Herat   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
It was captured by Alexander the Great in 330 BC during his war against the Persian Achaemenid Empire.
It was part of the Seleucid Empire but was captured by others on various occasions and became part of the Parthian Empire in 167 BC.
In 1040 it was captured by the Seljuk Empire.
bopedia.com /en/wikipedia/h/he/herat.html   (517 words)

  
 The Timurid Dynasty
The empire that Timur had built could not be kept together by his descendants, none of whom shared the same iron will that he had possessed.
However, although the size of the Timurid empire was drastically reduced, his successors went on to usher in the Muslim equivalent of the European Renaissance, centered in the cities of Samarkand and Herat.
Ulugh Beg, who ruled over the empire during the two years between his father's death and his own, was one of the greatest astronomers that the world has ever seen.
www.umid.uz /Main/Uzbekistan/History/Timurid_Dynasty/timurid_dynasty.html   (451 words)

  
 Persian Empire - Psychology Central   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Generally, the earliest entity considered the Persian Empire is Persia's Achaemenid Empire (648-330 BC) a united Aryan-indigenous Kingdom that originated in the region known as Pars (Persis) and was formed under Cyrus the Great.
Ismail's expansion was halted by the Ottoman Empire at the Battle of Chaldiran in 1514, and war with the Ottomans became a fact of life in Safavid Persia.
The German Empire retaliated on behalf of its ally by spreading a rumour that the Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany had converted to Islam, and sent agents through Persia to attack the oil fields and raise a Jihad against British rule in India.
psychcentral.com /psypsych/Persian_empire   (4721 words)

  
 History of Iran: Safavid Empire 1502 - 1736
Timurid state came to being an integrated Iranian Empire was under Timur's son Shahrokh Shah (1405-47), who endeavored to weld Azerbaijan, which demanded three military expeditions, and western Persia to Khorasan and eastern Persia to form a united Timurid state for a short and troubled period of time.
The Timurids relied on their old allies, the Qara Qoyunlus' rival Turkman of the "Aq Qoyunlu" (White Sheep) clans, whose Jahan Shah was destroyed by the Uzun Hasan of Aq Qoyunlu by the end of 1467.
Uzun Hasan (1453-78) achieved a short-lived Iranian Empire, but under his son Yaqub (1478-90), the state was subjected to fiscal reforms associated with a government-sponsored effort to reapply hard purist principles of orthodox Islamic rules for revenue collection.
www.iranchamber.com /history/safavids/safavids.php   (4245 words)

  
 The Islamic World to 1600: The Mongol Invasions (The Timurid Empire)
He was a Muslim, but that did not prevent him from attacking other Muslim empires, including the small principalities that had succeeded the Il-Khanate in Persia, the remnants of the Golden Horde, the newly formed Ottoman Empire in Asia Minor, and the Delhi Sultanate in India.
The Timurid Empire was not singularly defined by the fact that it was an Islamic empire.
The Timurid Empire survived another century under Timur's squabbling descendants, but it was eclipsed by the rising power of the Uzbeks in Central Asia in 1506.
www.ucalgary.ca /applied_history/tutor/islam/mongols/timurid.html   (1262 words)

  
 Culture: A historical junction: UNESCO   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The Achaemenid Persians were the first to include Afghanistan in their empire in the 6th century BC, but a few coins found at the foot of Tepe Maranjan in the centre of Kabul were the only surviving evidence of their presence.
Timurid art forged a new aesthetic by linking the cultural traditions of the many lands they conquered with their own Turkic origins.
Even after the collapse of the Timurid Empire, the faience mosaic and blue tiles that were its hallmark continued to exert strong influence on later flowerings of ceramic art in Iran and Turkey.
portal.unesco.org /es/ev.php-URL_ID=6648&URL_DO=DO_PRINTPAGE&URL_SECTION=201.html   (2389 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Timurids (Middle Eastern History, Biography) - Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Shah Rukh, Timur's son, ruled (1409–46) the eastern empire, including Khorasan and Transoxiana (region E of the Amu Darya, or Oxus, River).
This cultural rebirth had a double character; on one hand, there was a renewal of Persian civilization and art (distinguished by extensive adaptations from the Chinese), and on the other, an original national literature in the Turk-Jagatai language, which borrowed from Persian sources.
After his succession (ruled 1447–49) to the throne the Timurid empire fell into anarchy; the Turkmen horde known as the White Sheep conquered much territory, while the Uzbeks looted Samarkand.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/T/Timurids.html   (400 words)

  
 Morgan. Shah Isma'il I
In Khurasan the Timurids were no more: since 911/1506 the real enemy was Muhammad Shaybam Khan, ruler of the Ozbegs, who were to remain dangerous eastern adversaries of the Safawids at least until the end of the sixteenth century.
He attacked the Timurids to the south, invading Khwarazm and sacking the city of Urganj in the 1430s and occupying theJaxartes River area, in the east of Transoxania, in 849-50/1446.
The root cause of the conflict between the two empires lay in the fact that so large a proportion of the supporters of the Safawid cause came from among the Turkmen tribesmen of eastern and central Anatolia, near to, or actually inside, Ottoman territory.
coursesa.matrix.msu.edu /~fisher/hst373/readings/morgan.html   (4601 words)

  
 The 2002 Smithsonian Folklife Festival: Connecting Culture, Creating Trust
After his death, his vast empire was divided into four geographical areas, and Central Asia entered a period in which rulers vied with one another for control of lands.
In the late 14th century, eager to reconstitute Genghis Khan’s empire, Timur, leader of a small Turkic tribe in Samarkand, subdued the Ottoman Turks, swept through Iran, present-day Iraq, the Caucasus, and northern India, and conquered the other tribes in Central Asia to establish his Timurid Empire, with its capital in Samarkand.
After the collapse of the Timurid empire the region was taken over by a federation of Turkic-speaking tribes collectively called Uzbek.
www.silkroadproject.org /smithsonian/samarkand/geography.html   (852 words)

  
 Timurid Architecture in Samarkand
The empire that Timur had built could not be kept together by his descendents, none of whom shared the same iron will that he had possesed.
Timurid power in Central Asia came to an end with the advent of another Turkic tribe from the north: the Uzbeks.
Interestingly enough, one of the principle Timurid builders was Gawhar Shad, Shah Rukh's wife, who was responsible for a magnificent mosque at Meshed (built between 1405 and 1418) and a mosque-madrasah-mausoleum complex in Herat (1417-1437).
www.oxuscom.com /timursam.htm   (7656 words)

  
 Timurids on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
TIMURIDS [Timurids], dynasty founded by Timur (or Tamerlane).
Shah Rukh, Timur's son, ruled (1409-46) the eastern empire, including Khorasan and Transoxiana (region E of the Amu Darya, or Oxus, River).
After his succession (ruled 1447-49) to the throne the Timurid empire fell into anarchy; the Turkmen horde known as the White Sheep conquered much territory, while the Uzbeks looted Samarkand.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/T/Timurids.asp   (467 words)

  
 The Indian Empires
The Timurid double-dome inspired the double-domes of Mughal architecture, and the perfection of the transverse vault was 'the key to all the major innovations of Timurid architecture'.67 John Hoag, citing examples such as the
Timurid princes and pretenders often claimed authority in the border regions, and the nature of Timurid prestige was such that such claims often gained local support.
The Tazkira-yi-Muqim Khani portrays the Uzbeks as patrons and protectors of the Timurids during the Uzbek ascendancy in the fifteenth century.
www.globaled.org /nyworld/materials/india/thetimurid.html   (8536 words)

  
 POLITIES AND SILK ROAD TRADE, OR HOW TO RUIN A GOOD THING   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
In most cases, all the empires named were quite conscious of the benefits of trade and actively encouraged and supported it, although not always in the wisest fashion.
In the cases of both empires, this was probably to their overall detriment since it meant that trade was less than it might otherwise have been and that hardy traders would seek their way outside their borders.
His empire however was even shorter-lived and anyway, the silk road was at last in its decline as Henry the Navigator and a small school in the southwestern corner of Europe prepared to discover a sea route from Europe to China and change the world forever.
spotlightongames.com /quote/silk.rd.polities.html   (1976 words)

  
 Mesopotamia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
To the Parthian Empire (Persia)............141 BCE-226 CE The Parthians seized control of central and northern Mesopotamia from the Seleucid Empire in the mid 2nd century.
I place the Empire here, as a separate entry rather than as a phase of the Babylonian sequence, because it was a multicultural Empire which transcended any particular region.
Remnants to the Roman Republic and (27 BCE) Empire...
ellone-loire.net /obsidian/ancmesop.html   (1973 words)

  
 Iranica.com - HERAT
Memories of the city as the capital of the late Timurid empire and the second capital of the Safavids, known by the epithet da@r-al-SaltÂana, were fresh in the minds of the Qajar rulers, whose grand strategy was to reconstitute the Safavid empire.
The weakening of Safavid control of the periphery of the empire had provided an opportunity for the restive Abda@li Afghan confederacy in the vicinity of Herat to take control of the city, and the region as a whole, as early as 1717.
Upon the disintegration of the Afsharid empire at the end of the 18th century (see AFSHARIDS), Herat, to be followed soon after by the rest of Khorasan, fell under Ahámad Khan of the Sado@zi clan.
www.iranica.com /articles/v12f2/v12f2041f.html   (4555 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Canadian English   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Tory for a supporter of the federal Conservative Party of Canada, the historic Progressive Conservative Party of Canada or a provincial Progressive Conservative party; the U.S. use of Tory to mean the Loyalists in the time of the American Revolution is unknown in Canada, where they are called United Empire Loyalists.
The American Revolution was a revolution that ended two centuries of rule of the Thirteen Colonies by the British Empire and created the modern United States of America.
United Empire Loyalists is the name given to the portion of British Loyalists who resettled in British North America and other British Colonies as an act of fealty to King George III after the British defeat in the American Revolutionary War.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Canadian-English   (8559 words)

  
 Paradox Interactive Forums - The Timurid Scientists AAR
Deeply impressed by his ability, Shah Rûkh was the new ruler of the empire, and he ruled firmly but justly, or at any rate for a rather long time, in which many things of great import happened, which enabled later scholars to write lengthy diatribes, so that's all right.
The empire was stretched by the need to defend Iraq from the Mameluke and Ottoman armies, who had taken advantage of the war to launch a sneak attack.
They were the first to use cannon against the Mughal Empire, and the lesson taught was painful, as the few survivors of the 25,000 man cavalry army that struck and army of 45,000 infantry, 8,000 cavalry, and 130 cannon, testified, before their execution for cowardice in the face of extinction.
www.europa-universalis.com /forum/showthread.php?s=941e194cf762a21d90dafbc91e5f9bd4&threadid=29075   (9276 words)

  
 Shah Rokh --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Shah Rokh was the fourth son of Timur (Tamerlane), founder of the Timurid dynasty.
The Mughals were an Islamic dynasty that ruled large parts of India from the early 16th century until the middle of the 18th.
Nadir Qoli Beg was born in Kobhan, Iran, on Oct. 22, 1688, into one of the Turkish tribes loyal to the Safavid shahs of Iran.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9067070   (704 words)

  
 History of Afghanistan
While he was so engaged Shaibani Khan continued to eat away at the Timurid empire by subduing Balkh and Kunduz.
On the borders, the division was quite clear: Herat was held by the Persians; Kabul zealously maintained by the Moghuls.
For this period the most outstand-ing monuments in Afghanistan are Uzbak, such as the Shrine of Khwaja Abu Nasr and the monumental arch from the madrassa built by Sayyid Subhan Quli, dating from the end of the 15th and 17th centuries respectively.
www.afghanan.net /afghanistan/moghuls.htm   (878 words)

  
 "Herat Question" How Herat Separated from Iran - (CAIS) ©
Memories of the city as the capital of the late Timurid empire and the second capital of the Safavids, known by the epithet dâr-al-Saltana, were fresh in the minds of the Qajar rulers, whose grand strategy was to reconstitute the Safavid empire.
The weakening of Safavid control of the periphery of the empire had provided an opportunity for the restive Abdâli Afghan confederacy in the vicinity of Herat to take control of the city, and the region as a whole, as early as 1717.
Upon the disintegration of the Afsharid empire at the end of the 18th century, Herat, to be followed soon after by the rest of Khorasan, fell under Ahmad Khan of the Sadôzi clan.
www.cais-soas.com /CAIS/History/herat_question.htm   (4612 words)

  
 Herat: The Oriental Rug Gazette   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Nicknamed the "Sultan of Babylon," Timur initiated what was to begin one of the greatest artistic periods in Persian history; a period whose center was the city of Herat, in the province of Khorasan.
In the early 1400's the Timurid empire moved its capital from Samarakand to the city of Herat.
These two not only played a major role in identifying rugs being woven in Herat during Timurid rule, but also began to appear more and more in other competing rug weaving centers around the country, an unmistakable sign of the influence Herat was having during this time.
www.orientalrugcompany.com /gaz3.htm   (649 words)

  
 Central Asia - South   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
, Ghuristan, Herat, Hunza, Kabul, Kushan Empire, Kushanshahs, Maimana, Nagar, the Nezak, Peshawar, Qandahar, Qonduz, Sakae, Sar-I-Pul, Swat, Tajikistan, Tu-Mi, and Zabulistan.
Spitamana's daughter Apama was married to Seleucus I Nicator during Alexander's campaign to marry his generals and men to Persian women and create a hybrid empire.
The Emirs of Ghuristan were of the Shansabani clan that eventually would establish the Ghurid Empire in the 1100's.
www.hostkingdom.net /Centasia3.html   (1776 words)

  
 A short history of Pakistan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Alexander the Great includes the Indus Valley in his empire of Macedon in 326 BC and his successors found the Indo-Greek kingdom of Bactria based in what is today Afghanistan and extending to Peshawar.
Following the rise of the Central Asian Kushan Empire in later centuries, the Buddhist culture of Afghanistan and Pakistan, centered on the city of Taxila just east of Peshawar, experiences a cultural renaissance known as the Gandhara period.
Initially, the League adopts the same objective as the Congress, self-government for India within the British Empire, but Congress and League are unable to agree on a formula that would ensure the protection of Muslim religious, economic and political rights.
www.electionworld.org /history/pakistan.htm   (1218 words)

  
 Iran   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
With the fragmentation of the Timurid Empire, and the subsequent extension of control over western Persia to the Horde of the Black Sheep, the region between the Persian Gulf and the Zagros Mountains fell into the hands of the Musha'aha'ids.
Reunited under Mongol and then Timurid rule, the two regions have normally been within the same polity ever since, although the northern end of Azerbaijan has become distinct and separate in and of itself as a Caucasian state.
Andragoras' rebellion against the Seleucid empire was quickly followed by an invasion of Parthia by the Parni and allied Scythian and eastern Iranian tribes (Saka and Tocharians).
www.hostkingdom.net /iran.html   (2841 words)

  
 A short history of Iran   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
From 250 BC Persia is ruled by Parthia and in 226 BC Persia regains independence under the Sassanides.
In 642 a long period of foreign rule starts, in 642 by the Caliphate, in 1040 by the Seljuk Sultanate and in 1223 by the Mongols.
After a period of fragmentation in 1379 Iran becomes part of the Timurid Empire (under Tamerlane).
www.electionworld.org /history/iran.htm   (641 words)

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