Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Tiridates I of Parthia


Related Topics

In the News (Tue 21 May 19)

  
  Tiridates. Who is Tiridates? What is Tiridates? Where is Tiridates? Definition of Tiridates. Meaning of Tiridates.
Tiridates, or Teridates is a Persian name, given by Arrian in his Parthica (preserved by Photius, cod.
Tiridates fled to Syria, where Augustus allowed him to stay, but refused to support him.
During the next years Tiridates invaded Parthia again; some coins dated from March and May, 26 BC, with the name of a king "Arsaces Phioromaios," belong to him; on the reverse they show the king seated on the throne, with Tyche stretching out a palm branch towards him.
www.knowledgerush.com /kr/encyclopedia/Tiridates   (199 words)

  
 PARTHIA - LoveToKnow Article on PARTHIA
Parthia became a province of the Achaemenian and then of the Macedonian Empire.
Here, Arsaces and his brother Tiridates are derived from the royal house of the Achaemenids, probably from Artaxerxes II.; the young Tiridates is insulted by the prefect Agathocles or Pherecles; in revenge the brothers with five companions (corresponding to the seven Persians of Darius) slay him, and Arsaces becomes king.
But Seleucus was soon recalled by a rebellion in Syria, and Arsaces returned victorious to Parthia; the day of this victory is celebrated by the Parthians as the beginning of their independence (Justin xli.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /P/PA/PARTHIA.htm   (1130 words)

  
 Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, page 1151 (v. 3)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
tiridates II., king of Armenia, was the son of the Armenian king Vologeses.
Tiridates, who was then an infant, was saved by the fidelity of a servant and carried to the Romans, by whom he was educated with great care.
Although Tiri­dates displayed the greatest energy and courage, he was unable long to retain possession of his king­dom against the overwhelming power of the Persian monarchy.
ancientlibrary.com /smith-bio/3485.html   (935 words)

  
 Parthia (1)
The borders of Parthia were the Kopet Dag mountain range in the north (today the border between Iran and Turkmenistan) and the Dasht-e-Kavir desert in the south.
The Persian satrap of Parthia was Hystaspes, the father of the new Persian king; he managed to stand his ground against the Parthian rebels in the city Vishpauzâtish, where he repelled his enemies on March 8, 521.
In the confusion, Parthia was attacked by the Parni, a nomad tribe from the Central-Asian steppe.
www.livius.org /pan-paz/parthia/parthia01.html   (723 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Tiridates I
Tiridates I of Parthia, the brother of Arsaces I of Parthia.
In some histories he is described as ruling Parthia from 248 to 211 BC, but it is now believed that Arsaces was the ruler during this time.
Tiridates I may also refer to Tiridates II of Armenia (Trdat II).
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Tiridates-I   (172 words)

  
 Parthia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Parthia n Empire was the dominating force on the Iranian plateau beginning in the late 3rd century BCE, and intermittently controlled Mesopotamia between ca 190 BC and AD The Parthia ns were an illiterate nomadic people, thought to have spoken an Indo-Iranian languages, who arrived at the Iranian plateau from Central Asia.
It was not until the second century BC that the Parthia ns profited from the increasing Seleucid weakness and gradually captured all of their territories east of Syria.
By 129 BCE the Parthia ns were in control of all the lands right to the Tigris River, and established their winter encampment at Ctesiphon on the banks of the Tigris downstream from modern Baghdad.
www.portaljuice.com /parthia.html   (615 words)

  
 Tiridates of Parthia Definition / Tiridates of Parthia Research   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Tiridates I of Parthia was the brother of Arsaces I Arsaces I of Parthia was the chief of the Parni, one of the nomadic Scythian or Dahan tribes in the desert east of the Caspian Sea.
Tiridates II of Parthia Tiridates II of Parthia was set up by the Parthians against Phraates IV in about 30 BC, but expelled when Phraates returned with the help of the Scythians.
Tiridates III of Parthia Tiridates III of Parthia ruled the Parthian Empire briefly in 35–36.
www.elresearch.com /Tiridates_of_Parthia   (356 words)

  
 Parthian Empire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Tiridates died in 211 BC and was succeeded by his son Artabanus who himself died in 191 BC and succeeded by his own son Priapatius.
Parthia itself with Parthaunis as its capital is ruled by the Parni Clan of which King Phraates III is the head.
Aria is a desert country ruled by Gotarzes of Parthia the youngest son of the King of Kings Phraates III by virtie of his marriage to the Arian princess Asanthe Sohae.
www.donaldhs.vic.edu.au /home/spotter/Parthian_Empire.html   (1951 words)

  
 Articles - Tiridates III of Parthia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Tiridates III of Parthia ruled the Parthian Empire briefly in 35 – 36.
Tiberius sent Tiridates to the east, and ordered Lucius Vitellius (the father of the emperor Vitellius) to restore the Roman authority there.
However, Tiridates, who was proclaimed king, could not maintain himself, because he appeared to be a vassal of the Romans.
www.snapize.com /articles/Tiridates_III_of_Parthia   (171 words)

  
 History of Iran: Parthian Empire
After the fall of the Achaemenid Empire, Parthia, northeastern Iran, was governed by the Seleucid kings: a Macedonian dynasty that ruled in the Asian territories of the former Persian Empire.
In the confusion, Parthia was overrun by the Parni, a nomad tribe from the Central-Asian steppe.
Parthia, now impoverished and without any hope to recover the lost territories, was demoralized.
www.iranchamber.com /history/parthians/parthians.php   (1968 words)

  
 Parthia: History
By the time of Mithradates I's death, Parthia had expanded to include Mesopotamia, the richest and most populous of the regions in the Parthian empire, and the most Hellenized, as well as Elymais and Persis, thus completing their control of the overland trade routes between east and west.
The next major invasion of Parthia by Rome occurred during the reign of Vologases I, who attained the throne in 51 AD with the help of his two brothers, Tiridates and Pacorus II.
After ousting Tiridates, Corbulo's forces were defeated in their turn by Vologases' army, at which point, in 63 AD, a compromise was reached whereby Tiridates would be the king of Armenia, but would be crowned by Nero.
americanhistory.si.edu /collections/numismatics/parthia/frames/phisfm.htm   (2183 words)

  
 Tiridates - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tiridates was the name of three members of the Arsacid Dynasty of Parthia :
Tiridates I of Parthia was the brother of Arsaces I.
Tiridates or Trdat was the name of four kings of Armenia :
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Tiridates   (104 words)

  
 Parthian Stations   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Mark Antony then invaded Parthia with an army of about 100,000 men, this being in 37 B.C. His crossing of the Euphrates being opposed in strength, he turned into Armenia and carried on a year's campaign in upper Media, from which he was compelled to retire.
TIRIDATES (sometimes called Tiridates II) was set up by the Parthians in 32 B.C. against Phraates IV, but expelled when Phraates returned with the help of the Scythians.
In consequence of the power (if Parthia, Ctesiphon may be considered as a city rather than a village; from its size it is capable of lodging a great multitude of people; it has been adorned with public buildings by the Parthians and has furnished merchandise and given rise to arts profitable to its masters.
parthia.com /parthian_stations.htm   (10600 words)

  
 Parthia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Around 105 B.C., Parthia, a former empire on the Iranian plateau, exchanged embassies with China, inaugurating bilateral trade along the Silk Road.
Parthia ($700, 6x9-foot) is powerloomed of yarn-dyed New Zealand wool.
He died of his wounds as a POW on October 17, 1943, and a grave in Rangoon cemetery states ``buried near this spot...
www.hallencyclopedia.com /Parthia   (1002 words)

  
 Articles - Arsaces I of Parthia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Arsaces I of Parthia was the chief of the Parni, one of the nomadic Scythian or Dahan tribes in the desert east of the Caspian Sea.
But modern historians believe that he ruled Parthia until 211 BC, when he was succeeded by his son Arsaces II.
In ancient Chinese the name for Parthia was " Anxi " (Ch:安息, pronounced anshiak in Tang dynasty Chinese), a transliteration of the name of the founder Arsaces.
www.kamero.net /articles/Arsaces_I_of_Parthia   (297 words)

  
 PARTHIA - Online Information article about PARTHIA
of Parthia is known only by its Greek name Hecatompylos (" The Hundred-gated ") from the many roads which met there (Polyb.
of the Achaemenids, probably from Artaxerxes II.; the young Tiridates is insulted by the prefect Agathocles or Pherecles; in revenge the brothers with five companions (corresponding to the seven Persians of Darius) slay him, and Arsaces becomes king.
But Seleucus was soon recalled by a rebellion in Syria, and Arsaces returned victorious to Parthia; " the day of this victory is celebrated by the Parthians as the beginning of their independence " (Justin xli.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /PAI_PAS/PARTHIA.html   (1203 words)

  
 Parthia (2): the empire
The end of this loosely organized empire came in 224, when the last king was defeated by one of their vassals, the Persians of the Sassanid dynasty.
The first king of the Parthians (as the Parni were called from now on) was Tiridates' brother Arsaces I. His capital was Hecatompylos.
Parthia controlled the Silk road, the route from the Mediterranean sea to China.
www.livius.org /pan-paz/parthia/parthia02.html   (1922 words)

  
 Parthia
Parthia, ancient country of Asia, SE of the Caspian Sea.
In its narrowest limits it consisted of a mountainous region intersected with fertile valleys, lying S of Hyrcania and corresponding roughly to the modern Iranian province of Khorasan.
Phraates - Phraates, kings of Parthia of the dynasty of Arsaces.
www.factmonster.com /ce6/history/A0837742.html   (297 words)

  
 Corbulo, Armenia and Parthia
Vologeses, the King of Parthia, had begun interfering with Roman interests in Armenia, although the region was long contested by both great powers, it still retained some level of independence.
An initial attack by Tiridates was initially successful but not enough to have any lasting effect and he retreated into the deeper desert of Armenia to avoid direct conflict.
Corbulo followed but was unable to bring Tiridates to battle and broke off direct pursuit in order to focus on the Armenian capitals.
www.unrv.com /early-empire/corbulo-armenia-parthia.php   (893 words)

  
 Tiridates I (c. 29 - 26 B.C.)
A.D. who is not mentioned by Sellwood, and Tiridates III, subsequently identified by Sellwood.
Tiridates was a usurper who challenged Phraates IV
Note/ Sellwood reports that there are traces of the eagle on the obverse having been removed from the original die, and believes this indicates use by Tiridates I of the Phraates IV die modified to his purposes.
www.parthia.com /tiridates1.htm   (3085 words)

  
 Corbulo
The visit by Tiridates proved to be huge successes, allowing Nero to put on a magnificent display of Roman grandeur and humbling Tiridates by having him prostrate himself before Nero.
Even without the consulships however, the esteem and honors were great for the young Emperor, and it is certain he would have enjoyed the praises and genuine feelings of happiness of the senators as well as the general populace.
For Tiridates acquiescence to Nero's statue and the end of hospitalities it implied, Nero was hailed imperator and held a triumph.
home.planet.nl /~rcge7491/text/Corbulo.html   (2883 words)

  
 AUB - Berytus Archeological Studies
Before the advancing Seleucid army, Tiridates had to flee, and took refuge with the tribe of Apasiacae, in the Caspian steppe.
Tiridates overrode the returning army, cut it to pieces, and was crowned at Asaac, a nearby station on the imperial road.
Tiridates, we are told, ruled 37 years." Accordingly, he must have died in 211-0.
ddc.aub.edu.lb /projects/archaeology/berytus-back/berytus08/82.html   (496 words)

  
 Tiridates III (c. A.D. 224 - 228?)
A.D. The coins of Tiridates III were previously attributed to Artabanus IV by Sellwood
As for dating the reign of Tiridates III, we can tentatively assume that it is after the demise of Artabanus IV (c.
The fact that Tiridates does not style himself king also suggests that he might not have been an Arsacid prince.
www.parthia.com /tiridates3.htm   (900 words)

  
 My Lines - Person Page 96   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
He returned to Armenia in the midst of a Christian persecution pressed by King Tiridates III (who was a zealot for the regional idols) and was imprisoned in a burial pit.
He was brought to the throne by the Sacaraucae, at age 80, during a time of confusion in Parthia; chosen as the prince best suited to deal with the dynastic question; to clear up the succession and reunify the kingdom 0077 B.C..
Tiridates I, King of Parthia was brother (or alias) of King Arsaces I 0247-0211 B.C..
homepages.rootsweb.com /~cousin/html/p96.htm   (8121 words)

  
 Negotiations with Parthia in 30 BC   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Up to now, as long as Antony was around, even after the naval battle, Augustus had not given assistance to either side, though both had asked, and he had given no answer other than that he needed to think the matter over.
When Antony died, Tiridates was defeated and fled to Syria.
Phraates, being now in charge, sent ambassadors asking for friendship, that he should not help Tiridates, and that he should not allow him to remain in Syria, and he received one of the sons of Phraates as a favor, and took him to Rome and raised him as a hostage (History 51.18.1-3).
www.umich.edu /~classics/programs/class/cc/372/sibyl/db/Dio-li18.html   (186 words)

  
 The Ecole Initiative: Edessa in the Parthian Period   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The city was essentially an independent province of Parthia; it was too close to the border to be controlled.
Augustus had a defensive policy and was satisfied with the symbolic gesture of Parthia's returning the standards of Crassus' legions.
After some maneuvering of the troops and diplomatic actions, Tiridates was recognized by Rome, but had to travel to Nero to receive the crown from him.
www2.evansville.edu /ecoleweb/articles/pedessa.html   (3449 words)

  
 Notebook
The [A]parni, probably after some mixing with the local population, came to be called Parthians after the province they had appropriated; later, when their conquests were extended, the term Parthia came also to cover the whole of the area under their control.
Later Tiridates extended Arsacid possessions southward to Hyrcania and Comisene, where he established a new capital at Hecatompylus, now Shahr-i Qumis near Damghan [Hansman: 1968].
Western terrain was lost to Mithradates I of Parthia; Heliocles I took over a shrunken realm north of the Hindu Kush, with areas beyond the Oxus lost to encroaching nomad [p.
www.noteaccess.com /APPROACHES/Parthian.htm   (3561 words)

  
 TIRIDATES - LoveToKnow Article on TIRIDATES
TIRIDATES HI;, grandson of Phraates IV., lived as a hostage in Rome and was educated there.
in A.D. 35 they applied for a king to Tiberius, who sent Tiridates.
With the assistance of L. Vitellius Tiridates entered Seleucia, but could not maintain himself long (Tacitus, Ann.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /T/TI/TIRIDATES.htm   (281 words)

  
 Ancient coins of Parthia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
A.D. 224-228), under whom the rule of the Arsacids was subverted by Ardashir and the sceptre of Iran transferred to the dynasty of the Sassanidae (see under Persis, p.
The classification of the Arsacid coinage is far from certain, more especially in the period before Phraates IV, when the coins are, as a rule, undated, and only the dynastic name (‘Arsaces’) of each sovereign is recorded.
Tiridates I. Arsaces, son of Tiridates I. Phriapatius.
www.snible.org /coins/hn/parthia.html   (720 words)

  
 Vologases I of Parthia Definition / Vologases I of Parthia Research   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Vologases I of Parthia ruled the Parthian Empire from about 51 Centuries: 1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century Decades: 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s - 50s - 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s...
Son of Vonones II Vonones II of Parthia ruled the Parthian Empire briefly in 51.
During the reign of his brother Gotarzes II he was governor of Media, and was raised to the throne on Gotarzes' death.
www.elresearch.com /Vologases_I_of_Parthia   (258 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.