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Topic: Tonality


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  William Parker presents "Universal Tonality"
This was the scene for the premier of "Universal Tonality", an original work composed by William Parker and performed by his 15-piece Organic Orchestra on Saturday, December 14th.
The framing of "Universal Tonality" as a piece of High Art is reaffirmed in "Leaves Gathering" as a recording of Arabic drum chants is played while the musicians and audience sit silently.
This is the final climax of the work, which dwindles to a sonic coda in which a few sweet notes by Parker on the shakuhachi bring the piece to a quiet, meditative close.
www.gothamjazz.com /articles/wparker   (1260 words)

  
  tonality - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Tonality, broadly, the organization of music around a given note, the tonic note, that serves as a focal point.
Bach, Johann Sebastian : characteristics of compositions: tonality
Toward the end of the 17th century, the system of harmonic relationships called tonality began to dominate music.
encarta.msn.com /tonality.html   (146 words)

  
 The Tonal Centre - Tonality
Tonality is a word that has been given many definitions, and most of these are very broad - but that is because it is a concept which is easily obscured by its subtelty, and forgotten because of its pervasiveness.
Tonality describes the relationships between the elements of melody and harmony - tones, intervals, chords, scales, and the chromatic gamut; but particularly those types of relationship that are characterised as hierarchical, such that one of the elements dominates or attracts another.
These alternative tonalities are not generally recognised in conventional music theory, but here's hoping that some of the examples I give can convince you that there is a lot more for the tonal composer to experiment with, and the tonal theorist to analyse, than just the major and the minor scale.
www.tonalcentre.org   (496 words)

  
 Tonality
The cadences determines the form of a tonal piece of music, and the placement of cadences, their preparation and establishment as cadences, as opposed to simply chord progressions, is central to the theory and practice of tonal music.
Most tonality is "functional harmony", which is a term used to describe music where changes in the predominate scale or additional notes to chords are explainable by their place in stabilizing or destabilizing a tonality.
In the common forms of tonal organization, since a chord has a relationship to the tonic, which note is its fundamental note is set, not by which note is played lower than the others, but by which note establishes the chord's relationship to the tonic.
www.mp3.fm /Tonality.htm   (3349 words)

  
  Tonality - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Tonality, broadly, the organization of music around a given note, the tonic note, that serves as a focal point.
Bach, Johann Sebastian : characteristics of compositions: tonality
Toward the end of the 17th century, the system of harmonic relationships called tonality began to dominate music.
ca.encarta.msn.com /Tonality.html   (130 words)

  
  Tonality - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tonal music composed in other scale systems is referred to as microtonal, and while microtonal music draws from tonal theory, it is generally treated separately in text books and other works on music.
In tonal music chords which are moved to different keys, or played with different root notes are not perceived as being the same, and thus transpositional equivalency and far less still inversional equivalency are not generally held to apply.
The belief was that tonality had "snapped" because of expansion of vocabulary, decreased functionality, increased use of leading tones, alterations, modulations, tonicization, the increased importance of subsidiary key areas, use of non-diatonic hierarchical methods, and/or symmetry in interval cycles.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Tonality   (4624 words)

  
 The Tonal Centre - Tonality   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Tonality is a word that has been given many definitions, and most of these are very broad - but that is because it is a concept which is easily obscured by its subtelty, and forgotten because of its pervasiveness.
Tonality describes the relationships between the elements of melody and harmony - tones, intervals, chords, scales, and the chromatic gamut; but particularly those types of relationship that are characterised as hierarchical, such that one of the elements dominates or attracts another.
These alternative tonalities are not generally recognised in conventional music theory, but here's hoping that some of the examples I give can convince you that there is a lot more for the tonal composer to experiment with, and the tonal theorist to analyse, than just the major and the minor scale.
dspace.dial.pipex.com /andymilne   (496 words)

  
 Tonality of Kin Za Za | music quest of KINZAZA
However, if image and tonality serve certain functions in our mental life then study of it is beneficial for developing alternative ways of "hearing picture" and "seeing sound" for some if not for all as a kind of mind tuning.
"Tonality of Image" is my own definition of a controversial artistic phenomenon that is indicated by a whole range of expressions: "picturing sound", "visualizing music", "having/seeing a mental sound/picture", and, in some contexts, simply "hearing image".
Finally, the theory of tonal imagery was not directly implemented in my film (although it was extensively used as a meditative and creative process in visualizing many "moods" behind it) and it certainly improved my personal qualities as a filmmaker and art practitioner.
www.kinzaza.com /kinzaza/tonality.html   (5025 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for tonality
tonality Harmonic system that underpins most Western music from the 17th century to the 20th century, using the twelve major and minor scales.
In music that has harmony the terms key and tonality are practically synonymous, embracing a hierarchy of constituent chords, and a hierarchy of related keys.
Tonality is a form of musical organization that involves a clear...
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=tonality   (738 words)

  
 Insurgent Desire - the Tonality and the Totality
Tonality actually means the state of having a pitch-the tonic, as it is most simply called-that has authority over all the other tones; the systematics of this leading"note quality has been the preoccupation of our music.
In fact, tonal music is full of illusion, such as that of false community, in which the whole is portrayed as being made up of autonomous voices; this impression transcends music to provide a legitimizing reflection ofthe gener al division oflabor in divided society.
The greatest change in eighteenth century tonality in part influenced by the establishment of equal temperament (the division of the octave into twelve precisely equal semitones) was an even more emphatic polarity between tonic and dominant and an enlargement of the range over which the key modulation obtains.
www.insurgentdesire.org.uk /tonality.htm   (4088 words)

  
 Schoenberg on Tonal Function
For example, harmonic meaning or tonal function might be used as a scalar degree and its variations, used as a root of different chords (2); or even it can be associated to tendencies of individual pitches of a chord (3).
Schoenberg's idea of tonal function is based on the principle that a tonal work presents its tonal function, specific and general, related to a central tonality of the whole work represented by the principle of monotonality.
The function of a pitch is defined by being a scalar degree related to a tonic of a tonality, or of a tonal region.
www.rem.ufpr.br /REMv2.1/vol2.1/Schoenberg/Schoenberg_on_Tonal.html   (6280 words)

  
 Tom Pankhurst's TonalityGUIDE (pilot project)
Tonality dominated western music for around four centuries, and tonal music still lies at the core of the mainstream classical and popular concert repertoires.
Tonality is specifically an organisation of pitch, as opposed to the equally important parameters of rhythm, texture or timbre.
Tonal music relies on the division of this spectrum into octaves each of which is divided into the twelve semitones of the chromatic scale.
www.tonalityguide.com /introoverview.php   (593 words)

  
 Tonality, Modality and Atonality
Tonal music is at least as common today around the world as it was between 1600 and 1910, and examples of tonality certainly exist prior to 1600.
Tonal music, hence tonality, is that which conforms to major and minor keys and has, at least a minimal pc hierarchy (a tonic and probably also a dominant).
Composers of atonal music try to avoid all reminders of tonal music, evading major and minor chords (tertian chords in general), scales, keys, dominant functions, regular rhythms, repetition, etc. This means that atonality is psychoacoustical; i.e., it depends, at least partly, upon individual sensibilities and subjectivity.
solomonsmusic.net /tonality.htm   (1105 words)

  
 An Improved Model of Tonality Perception Incorporating Pitch Salicne and Echoic Memory
Structural approaches assume that the local ordering of pitches is relatively unimportant, and that the passage of time affects tonality perception only to the extent that the decay of sensory memory renders distant pitches less important than recent pitches in the determination of tonal center.
The C-orderings were designed so as to produce tonally ambiguous perceptions; that is, Brown purposely arranged the order of the pitch-classes so as to elicit the greatest variety of tonic responses from her listeners.
Butler, D. Describing the perception of tonality in music: A critique of the tonal hierarchy theory and a proposal for a theory of intervallic rivalry.
dactyl.som.ohio-state.edu /Huron/Publications/Tonality/tonality.text.html   (7134 words)

  
 GIML: Tonal Content Learnign Sequence   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Tonal learning is facilitated by development of a sense of tonality and a vocabulary of tonal patterns.
Tonalities and tonal functions are sequenced primarily according to familiarity.
Major tonality, for example, is introduced first in both learning sequence activities and classroom activities because it is the most common tonality in western culture and, therefore, the most familiar.
www.giml.org /tonalcontent.html   (477 words)

  
 Function of Tonality
Tonality is a technique for assuring a certain integrity in a composition; its major goal is to make comprehension easier.
In a tonal context, the relationship of the tonic to every note and all operations resulting to those notes have to be clearly comprehended.
The tonal structure of chords is used as a reinforcement of the physical structure of the tonic.
crca.ucsd.edu /~syadegar/MasterThesis/node16.html   (1156 words)

  
 Tonality at opensource encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-29)
Tonality is the character of music written with hierarchical relationships of pitches, rhythms, and chords to a "center" or tonic.
Though modulation may occur instantaneously without indication or preparation, the least ambigous way to establish a new tonal center is through a cadence, a succession of two or more chords which ends a section and/or gives a feeling of closure or finality, or series of cadences.
While tonality is the most common form of organizing Western Music, it is not universal, nor is the seven note scale universal, many folk musics and the art music of many cultures focuses on a pentatonic, or five note scale, including Beijing Opera, the folk music of Hungary, and the musical traditions of Japan.
wiki.tatet.ru /en/Tonal_music.html   (1733 words)

  
 Tonality
Tonality is a hierarchical arrangement of the triads based on the natural harmonics of overtone series of a note.
Tonality can be thought of as organizing the harmony of structures to a single point of gravity.
Tonality is a formal possibility that emerges from the nature of the tonal material, a possibility of attaining a certain completeness or closure (Geschlossenheit) by means of a certain uniformity.
www-crca.ucsd.edu /~syadegar/MasterThesis/node14.html   (1633 words)

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