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Topic: Traditional counties of Scotland


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In the News (Wed 21 Aug 19)

  
  Traditional counties of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The traditional counties have (even if the 1844 changes be accepted) many anomalies, and many small exclaves, where a parcel of land would be politically part of one county despite not being physically connected to the rest of the county.
The ceremonial counties used for Lord-Lieutenancy were changed from a set directly based on the ancient and geographic ones (with exceptions such as the City and Counties of Bristol and London) to an approximation of them based on the administrative counties and the county boroughs.
These counties are the ones usually shown on maps of the early to mid 20th century, and largely displaced the traditional counties in such uses.
www.lexington-fayette.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Traditional_counties_of_England   (2631 words)

  
 County Information - TextSheet.com
The county remains one of the oldest levels of government in China and significantly predates the establishment of provinces in the Ming dynasty.
The county of Oslo is equivalent to the municipality of Oslo.
At the County level there is a County Administrative Board led by a Governor appointed by the central Government of Sweden, as well as an elected County Council that handles a separate set of issues, notably Hospitals and Public transportation.
www.medbuster.com /encyclopedia/c/co/county.html   (1213 words)

  
 Scotland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Scotland, or in Gaelic, Alba, is a country (formerly an independent kingdom) of northwest Europe, occupying the northern third of the island of Great Britain.
Scotland was first united with England in 1603, when the Scottish King James VI also became James I of England.
Scotland comprises the northern part of the island of Great Britain; it is bordered on the south by England.
www.bidprobe.com /en/wikipedia/s/sc/scotland.html   (2688 words)

  
 Orkney Islands - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Orkney Islands are one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, and form a traditional county and Lieutenancy area.
As in the neighbouring mainland county of Caithness, these rocks rest upon the metamorphic rocks of the eastern schists, as may be seen on The Mainland, where a narrow strip is exposed between Stromness and Inganess, and again in the small island of Graemsay; they are represented by grey gneiss and granite.
The topography of the Orkneys is wholly Norse, and the Norse tongue, at last extinguished by the constant influx of settlers from Scotland, lingered until the end of the 18th century.
www.lighthousepoint.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Orkney_Islands   (2435 words)

  
 Banffshire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Banffshire (Siorrachd Bhanbh in Gaelic) is a small traditional county in the north of Scotland.
Before 1891, there were various exclaves of the county which were locally situated in Aberdeenshire, the biggest being the parish and village of.
The area the county covers is currently split for administrative purposes between Moray council and Aberdeenshire council.
www.bucyrus.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Banffshire   (171 words)

  
 Traditional counties of Scotland
The Traditional counties of Scotland are historical areas of Scotland.
Note: this map shows Ross-shire and Cromartyshire as one county, which was a change made to the administrative counties made in 1888.
Thus, it is not an accurate map of the traditional counties.
www.ukpedia.com /t/traditional-counties-of-scotland.html   (121 words)

  
 East Lothian - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
East Lothian (Lodainn an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland, and a Lieutenancy Area.
The East Lothian News was first published in 1972, as part of Scottish County Press group, with editorial offices in Dalkeith and printing at Bonnyrigg (both in Midlothian).
The content is mainly lifestyle features related to the county, including articles on local businesses and attractions, profiles of prominent people, activities such as sport and walking in the area, and historical pieces.
www.americancanyon.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/East_Lothian   (486 words)

  
 County town - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
A county town is the location of the administrative headquarters of a county.
In the case of Yorkshire in England, there are three county towns, one for each Riding: Northallerton for the North Riding, Beverley for the East Riding, and Wakefield for the West Riding.
The boundaries were altered again in 1996 to create Unitary Authorities and some of the traditional counties and county towns were restored for administrative purposes.
www.sterlingheights.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/County_town   (369 words)

  
 Subdivisions of Scotland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities.
Before then the administrative division was the region (pointedly not called counties, unlike their cousins in England and Wales), with a further subdivision of the district; this scheme was introduced on May 16, 1975.
Scotland has several other administrative divisions, which are handled by joint boards of the councils.
www.bexley.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Subdivisions_of_Scotland   (192 words)

  
 Traditional counties of Scotland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The traditional counties of Scotland are historic and cutural divisions of Scotland.
Apart from these entities, there had been 'counties of cities' (counties corporate) for centuries.
When county councils were introduced in Scotland in 1889, their areas, the administrative counties were based on the traditional counties, but the great many fragments and detached parts were consolidated, and Ross-shire was merged with the fragmentary Cromartyshire to form Ross and Cromarty.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Traditional_counties_of_Scotland   (155 words)

  
 Scotland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Scotland was first united with England in when the Scottish King James VI also became James I of England.
She has said that in monarchs will follow the international ordinal tradition where a monarch reigns in a number non-independent territories (or independent territories that agree share a monarch) that each have a number of previous monarchs of the same the highest ordinal used in any of territories is the one used across all.
The traditional political divides of left and right have also intersected with arguments over which all the UK-wide parties have supported some degree throughout their history (although both and the Conservatives have swithered a number times between supporting and opposing it).
www.freeglossary.com /Scotland   (2809 words)

  
 Shetland Islands - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Shetland Islands (sometimes historically spelled Zetland, formerly Hjaltland) are one of 32 unitary council regions in Scotland, and also form a traditional county and Lieutenancy area.
It is a Scottish island group between the Orkney Islands and the Faroe Islands, north of mainland Scotland, with a total area of approximately 1466km
The Shetland Islands were originally a Norwegian colony, and were pawned to the crown of Scotland on February 20, 1472.
www.leessummit.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Shetland_Islands   (281 words)

  
 lieutenancy areas of scotland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Lieutenancy areas of Scotland are the areas used for ceremonial purposes such as Lord Lieutenancy.
They are different from the traditional counties of Scotland and the Subdivisions of Scotland.
The four cities of Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh, and Glasgow have an ancient right to choose their own Lord Lieutenant, who is known as a Lord Provost and also acts as the city mayor.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /lieutenancy_areas_of_scotland.html   (147 words)

  
 Traditional Counties of Great Britain
The Association of British Counties (A.B.C.) is a society dedicated to promoting awareness of the continuing existence of the 86 traditional Counties of Britain.
A.B.C. believes that the traditional Counties are a vitally important part of the history, culture and geography of Britain.
However, they were always understood to be separate entities from the Counties themselves and, indeed, had separate terminology: they were labeled "administrative counties" and "county boroughs".
www.sterlingtimes.org /memorable_images42.htm   (365 words)

  
 Administrative counties of Scotland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The administrative counties of Scotland were set up in 1889 as areas that county councils would cover.
They were superseded by a system of regions in 1975, which in turn gave way to a system of unitary authorities in 1996.
The administrative counties excluded from their area the four 'counties of cities' in Scotland - Aberdeen, Dundee, Edinburgh and Glasgow.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Administrative_counties_of_Scotland   (153 words)

  
 scotland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Scotland, or in Gaelic, Alba, consists of a formerly independent kingdom located in the northern one third of the island of Great Britain.
The Church of Scotland (often referred to as The Kirk) is the national church.
The traditional political divides of left and right have also been characterised by arguments over devolution, which all the UK-wide parties have supported to some degree throughout their history (although both Labour and the Conservatives have swithered a number of times between supporting and opposing it).
www.fact-library.com /scotland.html   (2453 words)

  
 ADMINISTRATIVE COUNTY FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Though strictly inaccurate, these are often called 'administrative counties' to distinguish them from both the traditional counties, and the ceremonial counties.
In Scotland they were repealed in 1975 and replaced with a system of regions.
Technically, county_boroughs were (and in the case of Northern Ireland, are) administrative counties in their own right, as were the counties_of_cities in Scotland.
www.witwib.com /administrative_county   (190 words)

  
 Counties of England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Counties are usually divided into several districts[?], each with its own separate administration (districts may be called boroughs[?] in some cases).
When the counties were originally defined, they often included large areas of land owned by the local abbeys, resulting in a number of counties having small detached parts entirely surrounded by some other county.
The metropolitan counties were abolished as administrative entities in 1986 along with the county of Greater London (created in 1965) and broken up into their constituent districts, though statistical data are still published for the 1974-86 county areas.
www.city-search.org /co/counties-of-england.html   (603 words)

  
 shire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
These counties are typically (though not always) named after their county town.
The counties of Devon, Dorset, Rutland and Somerset were occasionally referred to with the "shire" suffix.
In Wales, the counties of Merioneth and Glamorgan are occasionally referred to with the "shire" suffix.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /shire.html   (430 words)

  
 Encyclopedia article on Scotland [EncycloZine]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Template:Otheruses Scotland (Scottish Gaelic: Alba) is a country or nation and former independent kingdom of northwest Europe, and one of the four constituent parts of the United Kingdom.
Scotland has a land boundary with England in the island of Great Britain and is otherwise bounded by seas and oceans.
Scotland took part in a personal union with England in 1603, when the Scottish King James VI also became James I of England.
encyclozine.com /Scotland   (3765 words)

  
 Articles - County town   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
A county town is the 'capital' of a county in the United Kingdom or Ireland.
County towns are usually the location of administrative or judicial functions, or established over time as the de facto main town of a county.
The eight administrative counties that existed in Wales between 1974 and 1996 were subsequently retained as lieutenancy areas.
lastring.com /articles/County_town?mySession=8c00fb8376f9d940e920af3...   (434 words)

  
 Scotland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Scotland was first united with England in 1603, when the Scottish King James the Sixth became James the First of England and Scotland.
In 1999, Scotland received its own devolved home rule parliament to govern the country on purely domestic matters.
Queen Elizabeth II Head of State of the United Kingdom is descended from King James VI, the first Scottish monarch to also be King of England (James I of England from 1603).
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/scotland   (2737 words)

  
 SingaporeMoms - Parenting Encyclopedia - Dunbartonshire
Dunbartonshire is one of the Traditional counties of Scotland, in that part of the country formerly called Lennox (which was a title of nobility).
Dumbartonshire County Council was set up in 1889/90, and at the beginning of the 20th century, some influential councillors had spelling of the County name changed from Dumbartonshire to Dunbartonshire.
The County disappeared as a political entity in 1974/5 when local government in Scotland was reorganised.
www.singaporemoms.com /parenting/Dunbartonshire   (178 words)

  
 Open Directory - Regional:Europe:United Kingdom:Scotland:Highland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Badenoch and Strathspey was formerly a district in the Highland Region of Scotland.
John o' Groats is a village in the traditional county of Cairthness, in the Highlands of Scotland.
Sutherland is a traditional county in the north of Scotland.
dmoz.org /Regional/Europe/United_Kingdom/Scotland/Highland/desc.html   (1011 words)

  
 REGIONS OF SCOTLAND FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The nine Regions of Scotland were established by the Local_Government_(Scotland)_Act_1973 as the uppermost tier of local government in Scotland.
They generally bore no relation at all to the former administrative counties that had been used since 1889.
The regions of Scotland were abolished on April_1, 1996 and replaced with the current unitary council areas of Scotland.
www.witwib.com /regions_of_Scotland   (142 words)

  
 Scotland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Scotland, or in Scottish Gaelic, Alba, is a country and former independent kingdom of northwest Europe, and one of the four nations comprising the United Kingdom.
Flower of Scotland'' won and is now used as the de facto national anthem at international sporting events, although there are those who still consider the other songs as having equal validity.
Scotland has a civic culture somewhat distinct from that of the rest of the British Isles.
www.yotor.com /wiki/en/sc/Scotland.htm   (3141 words)

  
 Traditional counties of Scotland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The dates of the borders varies for Cromartyshire only took its traditional shape as as 1685.
Fully forged from a single piece of German high-carbon stainless steel, this 3-inch bird's beak knife with its short, sharply curved blade and pointed tip is ideal for cleaning, peeling, and cutting fruits and vegetables and for shaping vegetables like...
Portmeirion Holly and Ivy Teacup and Saucer, Traditional Shape
www.freeglossary.com /Traditional_counties_of_Scotland   (463 words)

  
 What is a County?
In Scotland 31 lieutanancies were established in 1975 and revised in 1996, bearing some resemblance to the counties existing pre-1973.
In Wales for Ceremonial purposes there are eight "preserved counties" which have the same names as the 1974 - 1996 Administrative Counties, but have had their boundaries shifted to align more closely to the unitary councils.
In Northern Ireland the traditional six counties and two cities remain as they were before 1973.
www.gwydir.demon.co.uk /uklocalgov/whtsacty.htm   (355 words)

  
 Shire   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
In England, the counties of Devon and Dorset are occasionally referred to with the 'shire' suffix.
In local government terms, the phrase 'Shire county' refers to the non-metropolitan administrative counties of England outside London.
The term is often used by political commentators to describe the areas of England outside London and the 'metropolitan counties' created for the principal conurbations in 1974.
www.theezine.net /s/shire.html   (241 words)

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