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Topic: Transcendentalism


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In the News (Thu 18 Jan 18)

  
  American Transcendentalism Web
Sermon on "Transcendentalism for the New Age." Jane Rosecrans.
The Transcendental Legacy in Political and Social Reform
This interlinked hypertext was first created in Spring 1999 by Virginia Commonwealth University graduate students studying in Professor Ann Woodlief's class in Studies in American Transcendentalism.
www.vcu.edu /engweb/transcendentalism   (217 words)

  
  Rise of Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism cannot be properly understood outside the context of Unitarianism, the dominant religion in Boston during the early nineteenth century.
Transcendentalism was not a purely native movement, however.
For Transcendentalism was entering theological realms which struck the elder generation of Unitarians as heretical apostasy or, at the very least, as ingratitude.
xroads.virginia.edu /~MA95/finseth/trans.html   (1943 words)

  
  PAL: American Transcendentalism: ABrief Introduction
Transcendentalism as a movement is rooted in the American past: To Puritanism it owed its pervasive morality and the "doctrine of divine light." It is also similar to the Quaker "inner light." However, both these concepts assume acts of God, whereas intuition is an act of an individual.
Transcendentalism was a philosophical, literary, social, and theological movement.
Transcendentalism is usually spoken of as a philosophy.
www.csustan.edu /english/reuben/pal/chap4/4intro.html   (2606 words)

  
 Transcendentalism
The formation of the movement was in 1836 with the establishment of the Transcendental Club of Boston, Massachusetts.
Their transcendentalism seemed to be more of a combination of intellectual, aesthetic, and spiritual attributes.
The vigorous seedbed in New England for transcendentalism during the early half of the 19th century was among Unitarian ministers who were disappointed in Unitarianism at that time.
www.themystica.com /mystica/articles/t/transcendentalism.html   (1353 words)

  
 American Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism and evangelical Protestantism followed separate evolutionary branches from American Puritanism, taking as their common ancestor the Calvinism of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.
Transcendentalism cannot be properly understood outside the context of Unitarianism, the dominant religion in Boston during the early nineteenth century.
For Transcendentalism was entering theological realms which struck the elder generation of Unitarians as heretical apostasy or, at the very least, as ingratitude.
thoreau.eserver.org /amertran.html   (2800 words)

  
  Transcendentalism - MSN Encarta
Transcendentalism, in philosophy and literature, belief in a higher reality than that found in sense experience or in a higher kind of knowledge than that achieved by human reason.
The terms transcendent and transcendental were used in a more narrow and technical sense by Scholastic philosophers late in the Middle Ages to signify concepts of unrestricted generality applying to all types of things (see Scholasticism).
Transcendentalism also involved a rejection of the strict Puritan religious attitudes that were the heritage of New England, where the movement originated.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761565054/Transcendentalism.html   (674 words)

  
 PAL: American Transcendentalism: ABrief Introduction
Note: Nineteenth Century American Transcendentalism is not a religion (in the traditional sense of the word); it is a pragmatic philosophy, a state of mind, and a form of spirituality.
Transcendentalism as a movement is rooted in the American past: To Puritanism it owed its pervasive morality and the "doctrine of divine light." It is also similar to the Quaker "inner light." However, both these concepts assume acts of God, whereas intuition is an act of an individual.
Transcendentalism was a philosophical, literary, social, and theological movement.
web.csustan.edu /english/reuben/pal/chap4/4intro.html   (2606 words)

  
 Transcendentalism, Transcendence
The term transcendentalism is sometimes used to describe Immanuel Kant's philosophy and the philosophies of later German Idealists influenced by Kant.
New England Transcendentalism was a religious, literary, and philosophical movement that flourished especially between 1836, when Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay Nature was published, and 1844, when the semiofficial journal of the movement, the Dial, ceased publication.
Transcendentalism is an idealistic philosophy that in general emphasizes the spiritual over the material.
mb-soft.com /believe/text/transcen.htm   (965 words)

  
  Transcendentalism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Transcendentalism was a group of new ideas in literature, religion, culture, and philosophy that emerged in the New England region of the United States of America in the early-to mid-19th century.
Transcendentalism was rooted in the transcendental philosophy of Immanuel Kant (and of German Idealism more generally), which the New England intellectuals of the early 19th century embraced as an alternative to the Lockean "sensualism" of their fathers and of the Unitarian church, finding this alternative in Vedic thought, German idealism, and English Romanticism.
The term transcendentalism sometimes serves as shorthand for "transcendental idealism," which is the philosophy of Immanuel Kant and later Kantian and German Idealist philosophers.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Transcendentalism   (841 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Transcendentalism is a conglomeration of similar, but diverse ideas about literature, religion, culture and philosophy.
Transcendentalism itself is difficult to define concisely, due to the diverse expressions of those involved in the movement.
The term Transcendentalism was derived from the philosopher Immanuel Kant, who called "all knowledge transcendental which is concerned not with objects but with our mode of knowing objects." Ralph Waldo Emerson formulated and expressed the philosophy of Transcendentalism in his 1836 essay Nature.
wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/t/tr/transcendentalism.html   (256 words)

  
 American America History - Transcendentalism
Transcendentalism was a movement in philosophy, literature, and religion that emerged and was popular in the nineteenth century New England because of a need to redefine man and his place in the world in response to a new and changing society.
Transcendentalism was a reaction to an impoverishment of religion and mechanization of consciousness of eighteenth century rational doctrines that ceased to be satisfying.
Transcendentalism was a philosophy of individualism, aimed at the new American, self-reliant and democratic.
www.123helpme.com /view.asp?id=23363   (3549 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for transcendentalism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
transcendentalism This is the belief that God stands outside and independent of the universe of which He is the Creator.
transcendentalism School of philosophy that traced its origin to the idealism of Immanuel Kant.
He was an exponent of transcendentalism, the principles of which are expressed in his book Nature (1836).
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=transcendentalism   (740 words)

  
 transcendentalism, American literary and philosophical movement. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Transcendentalism derived some of its basic idealistic concepts from romantic German philosophy, notably that of Immanuel Kant, and from such English authors as Carlyle, Coleridge, and Wordsworth.
Although transcendentalism was never a rigorously systematic philosophy, it had some basic tenets that were generally shared by its adherents.
The ideas of transcendentalism were most eloquently expressed by Ralph Waldo Emerson in such essays as “Nature”; (1836), “Self-Reliance,” and “The Over-Soul” (both 1841), and by Henry David Thoreau in his book Walden (1854).
www.bartleby.com /65/tr/trnscdntl1.html   (425 words)

  
 transcendentalism - Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Transcendentalism derived some of its basic idealistic concepts from romantic German philosophy, notably that of Immanuel Kant, and from such English authors as Carlyle, Coleridge, and Wordsworth.
Although transcendentalism was never a rigorously systematic philosophy, it had some basic tenets that were generally shared by its adherents.
The ideas of transcendentalism were most eloquently expressed by Ralph Waldo Emerson in such essays as "Nature" (1836), "Self-Reliance," and "The Over-Soul" (both 1841), and by Henry David Thoreau in his book Walden (1854).
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-trnscdntl1.html   (795 words)

  
 Free Essay Transcendentalism VS Anti-Transcendentalism
The Transcendentalism movement was the mainstream flow of writers in the New England Renaissance, large in part to it affected all of the scholars of the period.
Regardless of Transcendental belief, Anti-Transcendentalists feel that every soul is born with sin, that sin being passed since the first man and woman, and must wipe it away though good deeds and noble acts.
Unlike their counterparts, believers in the transcendental philosophy believe that children are innocent from birth due to the fact that they have never commit a sin.
www.echeat.com /essay.php?t=27186   (1573 words)

  
 American Transcendentalism - 1
It would be misleading, however, to say that Transcendentalism entailed a rejection of Unitarianism; rather, it evolved almost as an organic consequence of its parent religion.
For Transcendentalism was entering theological realms which struck the elder generation of Unitarians as heretical apostasy or, at the very least, as ingratitude.
As a distinct movement, Transcendentalism had disintegrated by the dawn of civil war; twenty years later its shining lights had all faded: George Ripley and Jones Very died in 1880, Emerson in 1882, Orestes Brownson in 1876, Bronson Alcott in 1888.
cyberspacei.com /jesusi/authors/thoreau/amertran.html   (2378 words)

  
 From Revolution to Reconstruction: Outlines: Outline of American Literature: Democratic Origins and Revolutionary ...
Transcendentalism was intimately connected with Concord, a small New England village 32 kilometers west of Boston.
Emerson, who moved to Concord in 1834, and Thoreau are most closely associated with the town, but the locale also attracted the novelist Nathaniel Hawthorne, the feminist writer Margaret Fuller, the educator (and father of novelist Louisa May Alcott) Bronson Alcott, and the poet William Ellery Channing.
The Transcendental Club was loosely organized in 1836 and included, at various times, Emerson, Thoreau, Fuller, Channing, Bronson Alcott, Orestes Brownson (a leading minister), Theodore Parker (abolitionist and minister), and others.
odur.let.rug.nl /~usa/LIT/ch3_p2.htm   (542 words)

  
 Transcendentalism, by Theodore Parker
This amusing story is important not only in that it offers a veritable intellectual lineage of transcendentalism--from Plato to Goethe--but also in that it gives us a taste of the hysterical fear that transcendentalism incited in Parker's contemporaries.
I was sitting after dinner, in the great oaken arm-chair,--which was brought over from Devonshire by my ancestors in the time of the Long-Parliament, and in which three generations of them have dreamed their sermons after dinner, and I read that remarkable tract lately edited by 'A. N.' which relates to Transcendentalism.
It was the first time I had ever seen the word in print, and I never yet have heard it pronounced except by myself, with the accent on the second syllable, Trans-cend-ent-al-ism.
www.alcott.net /alcott/home/remarks/Senex.html   (1339 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Transcendentalism
The terms transcendent and transcendental are used in various senses, all of which, as a rule, have antithetical reference in some way to experience or the empirical order.
The transcendentals are notions, such as unity, truth, goodness, being, which are wider than the categories, and, going beyond them, are said to transcend them.
transcendental he understands the non-empirical or a priori elements in our knowledge, which do not come from experience but are nevertheless, legitimately applied to the data or contents of knowledge furnished by experience.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/15017a.htm   (1076 words)

  
 New England Transcendentalism
The Transcendental emphasis on the oneness of individual souls with nature and with God gave dignity and importance to human activity and made possible a belief in the power to effect social change in harmony with God's purposes.
The humanistic focus of Transcendentalism arose partly as a reaction against the increasing dehumanization and materialism engendered by the Industrial Revolution in the early 19th century.
Transcendental philosophy, on the other hand, was based on the premise that truth is innate in all of creation and that knowledge of it is intuitive rather than rational.
www.concordma.com /magazine/nov98/trans.html   (1362 words)

  
 Syllabus -- Transcendentalism -- Fall 2001
In the 1830s and 1840s, "transcendentalist" was a derisive label applied to someone whose philosophy was considered by mainstream Americans to be "vague and illusive." Those who bore that label frequently positioned themselves at odds with the dominant beliefs of the day but also differed quite radically from one another.
In order to discern the nature of Transcendentalism, we will attempt to know that nature as "transcendentally" as we can -- that is, we will try to understand Transcendentalism from the inside, as it were, rather than viewing it exclusively from some sort of (questionably) detached position.
An important component of Transcendentalism, these were at once sermons, forms of entertainment, interpretations of other literary works, exhortations, provocations.
www.oberlin.edu /english/syllabi/fall01/sm366f01.html   (1051 words)

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