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Topic: Transubstantiation


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  Transubstantiation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Transubstantiation (from Latin transsubstantiatio) is the change of the substance of bread and wine into that of the body and blood of Christ, the change that according to the belief of the Roman Catholic Church occurs in the Eucharist.
For this reason the consecrated elements are preserved, generally in a church tabernacle, for giving holy communion to the sick and dying, and also for the secondary, but still highly prized, purpose of adoring Christ present in the Eucharist.
The earliest known use of the term "transubstantiation" to describe the change from bread and wine to body and blood of Christ was by Hildebert de Savardin, Archbishop of Tours (died 1133) in about 1079, long before the Latin West, under the influence especially of Saint Thomas Aquinas (c.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Transubstantiation   (1401 words)

  
 Transubstantiation   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Greek for "transubstantiation" — as in "an alteration specifically of the fundamental substance or essence" in the Roman Catholic sense — would be "metousiosis".) Orthodox theologians have tended to refrain from philosophical reflections such as those of the Medieval Scholastics.
Some modernist Roman Catholic theologians sought to interpret transubstantiation as only a change of meaning and not a change of substance, however in 1965 Pope Paul VI mandated the retention of the original dogma of the 12th century.
Transubstantiation (and subsequent communion) has given rise to suggestions that this element of Christian worship involves cannibalism.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Transubstantiation.html   (801 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Transubstantiation   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Consubstantiation is a theory which (like the competing theory of transubstantiation, with which it is often contrasted) attempts to describe the nature of the Christian Eucharist in terms of philosophical metaphysics.
The earliest known use, in about 1079, of the term "transubstantiation" to describe the change from bread and wine to body and blood of Christ was by Hildebert de Savardin, Archbishop of Tours (died 1133).
According to Roman Catholic dogma, transubstantiation is the change of the substance of the Eucharistic elements — bread and wine — into the body and blood of Jesus (although they retain the physical accidents — i.e.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Transubstantiation   (3806 words)

  
 Protestantism and Catholicism Compared - Transubstantiation   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Roman Catholic doctrine of transubstantiation, which teaches that when the priest pronounces the words, 'This is my body', and, 'This is my blood'; the bread and the wine before him on the altar become the actual body and blood of Christ in everything but taste, color and texture, is not an isolated doctrine.
The notion of transubstantiation rests upon a mistaken interpretation of the words of Christ, 'This is my body', etc. When they are placed in their proper context of the Last Supper, in which they were uttered, it is difficult to imagine that they could have been so misinterpreted.
It was also argued that transubstantiation 'overthrows the nature of a sacrament', because a sacrament is by definition a sign of something, but this teaching turns the sacrament into the very thing it is supposed to signify or stand for.
www.godonthe.net /catholic_religion/transubstantiation.html   (776 words)

  
 Fr. Hardon Archives - Transubstantiation
Transubstantiation is not an outmoded concept of medieval scholastic philosophy.
It is an article of faith defined by the Council of Trent as the "wonderful and singular conversion of the whole substance of the bread into the body, and the whole substance of the wine into the blood" of Christ.
As understood by the Catholic Church, transubstantiation means that the whole substance of bread and wine cease to exist at the consecration at Mass.
www.therealpresence.org /archives/Eucharist/Eucharist_023.htm   (614 words)

  
 Transubstantiation, Real Presence
Transubstantiation, in Christian theology, is the dogma that in the Eucharist the bread and wine to be administered become, upon consecration, the actual body and blood of Jesus Christ, even though the external manifestations of the bread and wine - shape, color, flavor, and odor - remain.
Unlike the doctrine of transubstantiation, however, that of consubstantiation asserts that the substance of the bread and wine is also unchanged, the ubiquitous body of Christ coexisting "in, with, and under" the substance of the bread, and the blood of Christ in, with, and under the wine, by the power of the Word of God.
Transubstantiation is the theory accepted by Rome as a dogma in 1215, in an attempt to explain the statements of Christ: "This is my body" and "This is my blood" (Mark 14:22, 24) as applied to the bread and wine of the Lord's Supper.
mb-soft.com /believe/text/transub.htm   (3453 words)

  
 Transubstantiation   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
According to Roman Catholic dogma transubstantiation is the change of the substance the Eucharistic elements — bread and wine — the body and blood of Jesus Christ they retain the physical accidents — i.e.
Some modernist Roman Catholic theologians sought to transubstantiation as only a change of meaning not a change of substance however in 1965 Pope Paul VI mandated the retention of the original of the 12th century.
Transubstantiation (and subsequent communion) has given rise suggestions that this element of Christian worship cannibalism.
www.freeglossary.com /Transubstantiation   (931 words)

  
 Transubstantiation also, known as the Real Presence
Transubstantiation is the teaching that during the Mass at the consecration in the Lord's Supper (Communion), the elements of the Eucharist, bread and wine, are transformed into the actual body and blood of Jesus and that they are no longer bread and wine, but only retain their appearance of bread and wine.
Furthermore, transubstantiation states that the substance of the elements are miraculously changed, even though their appearance is not.
Where transubstantiation is the process of the change, the real presence is the result of that change.
www.carm.org /catholic/transubstantiation.htm   (2159 words)

  
 Transubstantiation and the Eucharist
Transubstantiation is predicated upon the distinction between two sorts of change: accidental and substantial.
Indeed, transubstantiation is difficult for the natural mind (especially with its modern excessively skeptical bent) to grasp and clearly requires a great deal of faith.
Transubstantiation may be considered beyond reason, yet it is not opposed to reason; suprarational, but not irrational, much like Christian theology in general.
www.chnetwork.org /journals/eucharist/eucharist_5.htm   (1700 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: The Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist
In a closer logical analysis of Transubstantiation, we find the first and fundamental notion to be that of conversion, which may be defined as "the transition of one thing into another in some aspect of being".
Finally, Transubstantiation differs from every other substantial conversion in this, that only the substance is converted into another — the accidents remaining the same — just as would be the case if wood were miraculously converted into iron, the substance of the iron remaining hidden under the external appearance of the wood.
That the consequence of Transubstantiation, as a conversion of the total substance, is the transition of the entire substance of the bread and wine into the Body and Blood of Christ, is the express doctrine of the Church (Council of Trent, Sess.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/05573a.htm   (9626 words)

  
 Catholic Culture : Document Library : Lutheranism and Transubstantiation
Transubstantiation is not in accord with the Scriptures.
Finally, to say that transubstantiation is unnecessary in view of the analogy with the Hypostatic Union and the omnipresence of the humanity of Christ hardly deserves comment.
It is not the purpose of the dogma of transubstantiation to explain the mystery of the presence of Christ, but to give a logical explanation of the words of institution which safeguard the dogmas of the Resurrection of Christ's humanity, His Ascension and the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist.
www.catholicculture.org /docs/doc_view.cfm?recnum=3013   (3136 words)

  
 ntx-communion-transubstantiation
Transubstantiation is a false doctrine because Jesus is not a liar: In Mt 26:29 after Jesus had said, "this is my blood" and prayed, he still referred to the contents as, "fruit of the vine".
Transubstantiation is completely unbiblical, being a doctrine that grew out of the Gnostic controversies of the mid second century and gradually developing to full flower in the 4th century.
Transubstantiation is as much an assault against scripture and the earliest apostolic traditions of the church, as it is an assault on reality and common sense.
www.bible.ca /ntx-communion-transubstantiation.htm   (8211 words)

  
 Agreements & Disagreements With Reformed Protestant Alastair Roberts' Series: Some Thoughts on Transubstantiation
The doctrine of transubstantiation, with its focus on the change that occurs in the sacramental elements, has produced a sharp discontinuity between the Eucharist and its OT precursors, where no such change is spoken of.
One of the problems with some forms of the doctrine of transubstantiation is that, through their treatment of the transubstantiated bread as some ‘new thing’, they have tempted people to treat the elements primarily as things to be gazed at, rather than as food to be eaten.
Transubstantiation goes back to the early centuries in kernel form, because a transformational view of the Eucharist was the leading opinion in the Fathers, so it is foolish to try to trace (the origin of?) this so-called "strange miracle" to later times.
ic.net /~erasmus/RAZ133.HTM   (9398 words)

  
 What is transubstantiation?
The Scriptures are wholly silent on the notion of the transubstantiation of the elements of the Lord's Supper.
The Scriptures declare that the Lord's Supper is a memorial to the body and blood of Christ, not the actual consumption of His physical body and blood.
The doctrine of transubstantiation is taught by Catholics as being found in such Scripture passages as John 6:55, which says "For my flesh is real food and my blood is real drink", and Matthew 26:26, which says "Take and eat; this is my body." However, these are clearly metaphoric.
www.gotquestions.org /transubstantiation.html   (251 words)

  
 Transubstantiation   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
It was during this periodthat the term 'transubstantiation' was coined.
Eventually, at the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215, and again at the Council of Trent (1545 - 1563) the terminology of transubstantiation was officially defined asdogma.
Some modernist Roman Catholic theologians sought to interpret transubstantiation as only a change of meaning and not a changeof substance, however in 1965 Pope PaulVI mandated the retention of the original dogma of the 12th century.
www.therfcc.org /transubstantiation-10972.html   (928 words)

  
 Transubstantiation
The Roman Catholic Church accordingly believes that through transubstantiation Christ is really, truly and substantially present under the remaining appearances of bread and wine, and that the transformation remains as long as the appearances remain.
Some recent Anglican writers explicitly accept the doctrine of transubstantiation, while most expound a doctrine of the Real Presence akin to the concept of metousiosis or, while avoiding the term "transubstantiation", speak of an "objective presence" of Christ in the Eucharist.
This refusal to endorse explanatory doctrines, particularly transubstantiation, is sometimes interpreted by non-Lutherans as denial of the Real Presence.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/t/tr/transubstantiation.html   (1462 words)

  
 transubstantiation - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about transubstantiation
In Christian theology, the doctrine that the whole substance of the bread and wine, while retaining its outward appearance, changes into the substance of the body and blood of Jesus when consecrated in the Eucharist.
Other denominations disagree about the nature of the real presence of Jesus in the bread and wine, or the meaning of Jesus' words in the Gospels when he said that the bread was his body, and the wine, his blood.
The doctrine of transubstantiation was rejected by Protestant churches during the Reformation, although belief in the real presence was retained by some denominations.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /transubstantiation   (213 words)

  
 The Glory of Transubstantiation (This Rock: January 2005)
transubstantiation then is not so much the sacrament as the divinely revealed explanation of the truth of the sacrament.
transubstantiation is not the eucharistic sacrifice, but it is the hidden power that makes the sacrifice a reality and not a mere symbol.
They thought that transubstantiation corresponded exactly with the first stage of a sacrifice, the bringing in of a victim, as through it Christ’s body and blood were brought on to our altars.
www.catholic.com /thisrock/2005/0501clas.asp   (2841 words)

  
 Definition of Transubstantiation
With Scholastic theological study in the early Middle Ages, and especially after Aristotelianism began to be a major element of Catholic thought, this concept became more technical in its terminology, as the scholastics inquired philosophically how and in what way the bread and wine become the body and blood of Christ.
This doctrine agrees with Transubstantiation, and disagrees with Commemoration, in the claim that there is a real presence of Christ in the Eucharist.
In literature the conflict between Consubstantiation and Transubstantiation was satirically described in Jonathan Swift's "Gulliver's Travels" as war between Lilliput and Blefuscu.
www.wordiq.com /definition/Transubstantiation   (985 words)

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