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Topic: Trinomial nomenclature


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In the News (Sun 26 May 19)

  
  Trinomial nomenclature - Biocrawler
Trinomial nomenclature is a taxonomic naming system that extends the standard system of binomial nomenclature by adding a third taxon.
It is used in biology when the organisms within a species fall into separate groupings that need to be distinguished.
The simplest form of trinomial nomenclature occurs when only a subspecies is being specified.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Trinomial_nomenclature   (656 words)

  
 Nomenclatural Glossary for Zoology - Thomson Scientific
In zoological works genus-group names cited in binomial names of species are often abbreviated to one or two letters, which should always be followed by a full stop, and not used on the first mention of a name; similarly for specific names cited in trinomial names of subspecies.
the nomenclatural act of an author or the Commission in fixing, by an express statement, the name-bearing type of a newly or previously established nominal genus, subgenus, species, or subspecies.
the level, for nomenclatural purposes, of a taxon in a taxonomic hierarchy (e.g.
scientific.thomson.com /support/products/zr/zoological-glossary   (7330 words)

  
 Curiosities of Biological Nomenclature
In botanical nomenclature, the authors are given in taxonomic monographs, and if a name is changed, both the original author (in parentheses) and the revising author are named.
For an extensive and growing list and description of biodiversity, organized in the context of the evolutionary tree, see The Tree of Life.
Definitions and Abbreviations for an index of rules for bacterial nomenclature.
home.earthlink.net /~misaak/taxonomy.html   (1410 words)

  
  Binomial nomenclature:
This is called trinomial nomenclature, and is written differently in zoology and botany.
The adoption of a system of binomial nomenclature is due to Swedish botanist and physician Carolus Linnaeus (1707 – 1778) who attempted to describe the entire known natural world and gave every species (mineral, vegetable or animal) a two-part name.
However, binomial nomenclature in various forms existed before Linnaeus, and was used by the Bauhins, who lived nearly two hundred years before Linnaeus.
pandapedia.com /wiki/Binomial_nomenclature   (1463 words)

  
  Binomial nomenclature - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
The adoption of a system of binomial nomenclature is due to Swedish botanist and physician Carolus Linnaeus (1707–1778) who attempted to describe the entire known natural world and gave every species (mineral, vegetable or animal) a two-part name.
However, binomial nomenclature in various forms existed before Linnaeus, and was used by the Bauhins, who lived nearly two hundred years before Linnaeus.
In this case, however, conservation according to the nomenclature Codes is possible.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Binomial_nomenclature   (1089 words)

  
 Binomial nomenclature
Nomenclature intends to keep names stable, but quite often this is not true: an organism may have several names, reflecting different rank and position in taxonomy, depending on opinion (see synonymy[?]), conservation[?] according to nomenclature codes[?], and new findings based on molecular phylogeny.
Nomenclature must acknowledge the achievement of scientists who were first to name a taxon.
Carolus Linnaeus invented this classification, but it is a common misconception that he also invented binomial nomenclature; in fact it dates back to the Bauhins.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/bi/Binomial_nomenclature.html   (307 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Trinomial name
Nomenclature intends to keep names stable, but quite often this is not true: an organism may have several names, reflecting different rank and position in taxonomy, depending on opinion (see synonymy[?]), conservation[?] according to nomenclature codes[?], and new findings based on molecular phylogeny.
Nomenclature must acknowledge the achievement of scientists who were first to name a taxon.
Carolus Linnaeus invented this classification, but it is a common misconception that he also invented binomial nomenclature; in fact it dates back to the Bauhins.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/tr/Trinomial_name   (332 words)

  
 Trinomial nomenclature
Trinomial nomenclature is used in biology when the organisms within a species fall into separate groupings that need to be distinguished even though they could interbreed, so that the usual binomial nomenclature does not suffice to identify an organism adequately.
Because of geographical isolation and adaptation to the different circumstances the regional population evolves and over time may become a separate species.
The simplest form of trinomial nomenclature occurs when only a subspecies is being specified.
www.teachtime.com /en/wikipedia/t/tr/trinomial_nomenclature.html   (343 words)

  
 Taxonomy and Nomenclature
Nomenclature is a formal system of names used to label taxonomic groups.
Traditionally, generic and specific names are set in italic type, and in some works the name of the author is put in parentheses if he or she originally placed the species in a different genus.
Finally, subspecies may be recognized with trinomial nomenclature -- by adding a third name to the specific name.
www.stanford.edu /group/stanfordbirds/text/essays/Taxonomy.html   (885 words)

  
 Scientific classification - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
This convention for naming species is referred to as binomial nomenclature.
Today, nomenclature is regulated by Nomenclature Codes, which allows names divided into ranks: see rank (botany) and rank (zoology).
A new formal code of nomenclature, the PhyloCode, is currently under development, intended to deal with clades rather than taxa.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/s/c/i/Scientific_classification.html   (1152 words)

  
 Trinomial - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Trinomial, mathematical expression consisting of the sum or difference of three terms, each of which contains variables raised to a positive...
In biology, trinomial nomenclature refers to names for taxa below the rank of species.
Factor each trinomial, enter the result in the box provided.
encarta.msn.com /Trinomial.html   (197 words)

  
 Cat - Encyclopedia Jr, free information reference for Kids
The trinomial name of the domestic cat is Felis silvestris catus; its closest pre-domesticated ancestor is believed to be the African wild cat, Felis silvestris lybica.
A group of cats is referred to as a clowder, a male cat is called a tom, and a female is called a queen.
The domestic cat is now considered a subspecies of the wild cat: by the strict rule of priority of the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature the name for the species thus ought to be F.
www.encyclopediajr.com /wikiarticle/c/a/t/cat.php   (10273 words)

  
 account for scientific namegiving
"Trinomial nomenclature is a naming system that extends the standard system of binomial nomenclature by adding a third taxon.
The International code for the nomenclature of cultivated plants (1953) is accepted and has been implemented by hobbyists and professionals.
Examples of trinomial scientific names: The scientific name of the mutation factor is placed behind the binomial name and placed in parenthesis.
www.bourkes-parakeet.nl /pg/account-namegiving.html   (4737 words)

  
 Revisiting Binomial nomenclature : Exploring Essential Information, Data and Explanation.
When a species is further divided, a trinomial nomenclature is used, e.g.
Carolus Linnaeus invented this classification, but it is a common misconception that he also invented binomial nomenclature; in fact it dates back to the Bauhins.
A bacteriological code of nomenclature was approved at the 4th International Congress for Microbiology in 1947, but was later discarded.
www.llpoh.org /Biology_Update/Binomial_nomenclature.html   (1410 words)

  
 Binomial nomenclature
The adoption of a system of binomial nomenclature is due to Swedish botanist and physician Carolus Linnaeus (1707–1778) who described the entire known natural world and gave every species (mineral, vegetable or animal) a two part name.
However, binomial nomenclature in various forms existed before Linnaeus, and was used by the Bauhins, who lived nearly two hundred years before Linnaeus.
In this case, however, conservation according to the nomenclature Codes is possible.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/b/bi/binomial_nomenclature.html   (834 words)

  
  Taxonomy II: Nomenclature
Thus, the central idea behind the Linnaean taxonomic system was to provide a stable, enduring list of names so that we can communicate effectively in all the fields of the life sciences, retrieve information efficiently and be confident that each species name is one of a kind.
Trinomials even apply to our own species, as shown by the recent naming of an extinct subspecies from Ethiopia that was based on fossils that are about 160,000 years old.
Tyrannosaurus rex (Osborn, 1905) is a name that is eluding one of the cardinal rules of taxonomy, the principle of priority, which requires that in cases where synonyms are known to occur, the first name given to a species is recognized as the authentic one.
www.visionlearning.com /library/module_viewer.php?mid=89&l=&c3=   (1746 words)

  
 Station Information - Scientific classification
This convention is now referred to as binomial nomenclature, and the name formed from the two parts is known as the scientific name or "systematic name" of a species.
When a species in further subdivided, the trinomial nomenclature is used.
A formal code of phylogenetic nomenclature, the Phylocode[1], is currently under development for a cladistic taxonomy that abandons the Linnaean structure.
www.stationinformation.com /encyclopedia/s/sc/scientific_classification_1.html   (934 words)

  
 The Significance of Trinomials
Nomenclature is not a subject of much popular interest, but since the varied faunal conditions of California bring it constantly to the attention of the system- atic zoologists of the State, the present publication may be warranted.
The use of trinomials, as established by the A. Code and adopted by most writers on vertebrates, is generally understoqd to be the designation of the geographic variants of a wide ranging form, which merge into one another where their ranges join--i.
A trinomial properly used means just twice as much as a binomial, and with the present practice of naming every slightly differ- entiated form, a purely binomial system will soon mean nothing except to the specialist on each group--the mind cannot place such a host of names.
elibrary.unm.edu /sora/Condor/files/issues/v005n02/p0043-p0045.html   (914 words)

  
 Learn more about Trinomial nomenclature in the online encyclopedia.   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Learn more about Trinomial nomenclature in the online encyclopedia.
Trinomial nomenclature is used in biology when the organisms within a species fall into separate groupings that need to be distinguished even though they could interbreed, so that the usual binomial nomenclature does not suffice to identify an organism adequately.
Because of geographical isolation and adaptation to the different circumstances the regional population evolves and over time may become a seperate species.
www.onlineencyclopedia.org /t/tr/trinomial_nomenclature.html   (417 words)

  
 How animals are given scientific names
There are three main Codes of Nomenclature: the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature, covering animals; the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature, covering plants (including fungi); and the International Code of Nomenclature of Bacteria.
Hugh Strickland presented a Code of nomenclature to the British Association for the Advancement of Science (Charles Darwin was on its committee).
The Commission of Zoological Nomenclature decide that an available name is never to be used as a valid name despite the fact that it might be a senior synonym or homonym.
www.museums.org.za /bio/animal_nomenclature.htm   (3011 words)

  
 Scientific classification - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Even though the parallel use of nomina trivialia and many-worded descriptive names continued until late in the eighteenth century, it was gradually replaced by the practice of using shorter proper names combined of the generic name and the trivial name of the species.
Today, nomenclature is regulated by Nomenclature Codes, which allows names divided into ranks; see rank (botany) and rank (zoology).
A new formal code of nomenclature, the PhyloCode, is currently under development, intended to deal with clades rather than taxa.
www.proxygasp.com /index.php?q=aHR0cDovL2VuLndpa2lwZWRpYS5vcmcvd2lraS9TdXBlcmZhbWlseQ==   (2294 words)

  
 info: Trinomial_nomenclature   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Trinomial nomenclatureTrinomial nomenclature Trinomial nomenclature is used in biology when the organisms within a species fall into separate groupings that need to be distinguished even though they could interbreed, so...
Binomial nomenclatureWhen a species is further divided, a Trinomial nomenclature is used (e.g.
trinomial nomenclature ____ In the scientific name Homo sapiens, sapiens is the name of the a.
www.napoli-pizza.net /Trinomial_nomenclature.html   (295 words)

  
 Binomial nomenclature - Japan   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The adoption of a system of binomial nomenclature is due to Swedish botanist and physician Carolus Linnaeus (1707–1778) who attempted to describe the entire known natural world and gave every species (mineral, vegetable or animal) a two-part name.
However, binomial nomenclature in various forms existed before Linnaeus, and was used by the Bauhins, who lived nearly two hundred years before Linnaeus.
Binomial nomenclature is the most common naming convention used for organisms.
binomial-nomenclature.zdnet.co.za /zdnet/Binomial_nomenclature   (1464 words)

  
 Binomial nomenclature - Netencyclo encyclopedia : Binomial nomenclature
In biology, binomial nomenclature is the formal system of naming species.
The system is also called binominal nomenclature (particularly in zoological circles), binary nomenclature (particularly in botanical circles), or the binomial classification system.
The essence of it is that each species name is in (modern scientific) Latin and has two parts, so that it is also sometimes popularly known as the Latin name of the species, although this terminology is frowned upon by biologists and philologists, who prefer the phrase scientific name.
www.netencyclo.com /en/Binomial_nomenclature   (1535 words)

  
 trinomial nomenclature   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Abacci > Abaccipedia > tr > trinomial nomenclature
Trinomial nomenclature is a taxonomic naming system that extends the standard system of binomial nomenclature by adding a third epithet.
* Phalacrocorax carbo novaehollandiae Stephens, 1826 (no abbreviation is included with animal trinomials, novaehollandis is assumed to be a subspecies, and was described by Stephens in 1826)
www.abacci.com /wikipedia/topic.aspx?cur_title=trinomial_nomenclature   (437 words)

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