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Topic: Trojan War


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In the News (Sun 19 Nov 17)

  
  Royalty.nu - The Trojan War - History, Myth and Homer - Schliemann
The Trojan War: Literature and Legends From the Bronze Age to the Present by Diane P. Thompson.
In Homer's tale of the Trojan War, animal sacrifice is used to bolster the royal authority of Agamemnon and emphasize Akhilleus' isolation.
Troy VII and the Historicity of the Trojan War
www.royalty.nu /legends/Troy.html   (2966 words)

  
  Trojan War - MSN Encarta
Trojan War, in Greek legend, famous war waged by the Greeks against the city of Troy.
The tradition is believed to reflect a real war between the Greeks of the late Mycenaean period and the inhabitants of the Troad, or Troas, in Anatolia, part of present-day Turkey.
Legendary accounts of the war traced its origin to a golden apple, inscribed “for the fairest” and thrown by Eris, goddess of discord, among the heavenly guests at the wedding of Peleus, the ruler of Myrmidons, and Thetis, one of the Nereids.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761556458/Trojan_War.html   (470 words)

  
  Trojan War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Trojan War was a war waged, according to legend, against the city of Troy in Asia Minor (present-day Turkey), by the armies of the Achaeans, after Paris of Troy stole Helen from her husband Menelaus, king of Sparta.
The war sprang from a quarrel between the goddesses Athena, Hera and Aphrodite, after the goddess Eris ("Strife") gave them a golden apple with the inscription "to the fairest" (sometimes known as the apple of Discord).
It is possible that the Trojan War was a conflict between the king of Ahhiyawa and the Assuwa confederation.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Trojan_War   (8941 words)

  
 Trojan War   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Template:Greek myth The Trojan War was a war waged according to against the city of Troy in Asia Minor by the armies Greece following the kidnapping (or elopement) of Helen of Sparta by Paris of Troy.
In order to avoid the war feigned madness and sowed his fields with Palamedes outwitted him by putting his infant in front of the plough and Odysseus aside unwilling to kill his son and revealed his sanity and joined the war.
During the Trojan War Xanthus a magical horse was rebuked by for allowing Patroclus to be killed.
www.freeglossary.com /Trojan_War   (3079 words)

  
 Heroes in the Trojan War
In the Trojan War, Achilles was regarded as the handsomest, the swiftest, the strongest and the bravest of the Greeks who fought in the Trojan War.
Trojan War, Odyssey, Death of Iphitus, Death of Heracles.
It was Helenus who told the Greeks of the requirements of winning the war, such as Neoptolemus and Philoctetes with the bow of Heracles was needed at Troy, the bones of Pelops need to be relocated and stealing the Palladium from the altar of Athena.
www.timelessmyths.com /classical/heroes2.html   (9260 words)

  
 Troy - All About Turkey
Then Menelaus army sailed to Asia Minor and attacked Teuthrania in Mysia opposite of Lesbos, but they had mistaken according to Trojan territory and the army were beaten at the mouth of the Caicus river and driven back to their ship by Telephus, king of Mysia and ally of Troy.
After the death of Trojan ally Memnon in a battle at the Scaeon gate, Paris strikes Achilles in his heel (the famous 'Achilles heel' comes from here), the only place where Achilles was vulnerable.
Trojans found the horse and the ashes of the camp and pulled the horse into the city.
www.allaboutturkey.com /troy.htm   (1703 words)

  
 Trojan War - Crystalinks
The Trojan War was a war waged, according to legend, against the city of Troy in Asia Minor by the armies of the Achaeans, following the kidnapping (or elopement) of Helen of Sparta by Paris of Troy.
The war is among the most important events in Greek mythology and was narrated in a cycle of epic poems of which only two, the Iliad and the Odyssey of Homer, survive intact.
The Trojans, who were understandably overjoyed that the ten-year siege had lifted, entered a night of mad revelry and celebration, and when the Greeks emerged from the horse the city was in a drunken stupor.
www.crystalinks.com /trojanwar.html   (3319 words)

  
 The Trojan War
In the tenth year of the war (where the narrative of the Iliad begins), Agamemnon insulted Apollo by taking as a slave- hostage the girl Chryseis, the daughter of Chryses, a prophet of Apollo, and refusing to return her when her father offered compensation.
He told the Trojans that the horse was an offering to Athena and that the Greeks had built it to be so large that the Trojans could not bring it into their city.
Aeneas, the son of Anchises and the goddess Aphrodite and one of the important Trojan leaders in the Trojan War, fled from the city while the Greeks were destroying it, carrying his father, Anchises, his son Ascanius, and his ancestral family gods with him.
www.geocities.com /~dvadi/myth/trojanwar.html   (4241 words)

  
 Trojan War
The Trojan War was the greatest conflict in the Greek mythology, a war that was to influences people in literature and arts for centuries.
The war was fought between the Greeks and Trojans with their allies, upon a Phrygian city of Troy (Ilium), on Asia Minor (modern Turkey).
Her other prophecy warned Achilles not to be the first Greek to jump on Trojan soil, or else he would be the first to die (see Arrival in Troy about the death of the first Greek leader).
www.timelessmyths.com /classical/trojanwar.html   (10203 words)

  
 The Trojan War | La Guerra de Troya, Greek Mythology Link - www.maicar.com
Trojans were called all those who were under the sway of Priam 1, whether they came from the city of Troy or not.
On seeing him she thought that Protesilaus had returned from the war, and talked with him for three hours; but when her husband was carried back to the Underworld, she stabbed herself to death, not being able to endure him dying twice, or else she let herself burn together with her husband's image.
And assuming the shape of Laodocus 3, a Trojan spearman, she induced Pandarus 1 to shoot an arrow at Menelaus.
www.maicar.com /GML/TrojanWar.html   (10722 words)

  
 The Trojan War | La Guerra de Troya, Greek Mythology Link - www.maicar.com
Trojans were called all those who were under the sway of Priam 1, whether they came from the city of Troy or not.
On seeing him she thought that Protesilaus had returned from the war, and talked with him for three hours; but when her husband was carried back to the Underworld, she stabbed herself to death, not being able to endure him dying twice, or else she let herself burn together with her husband's image.
And assuming the shape of Laodocus 3, a Trojan spearman, she induced Pandarus 1 to shoot an arrow at Menelaus.
homepage.mac.com /cparada/GML/TrojanWar.html   (10722 words)

  
 Trojan War
In Greek mythology the Trojan War pitted a coalition of Greek principalities against Troy, a city located on the coast of what is now Anatolia, just south of the entrance to the Dardanelles.
The war was the subject of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey.
Only in the tenth year, after Achilles had killed Hector, the greatest of the Trojan warriors, were the Greeks assured of victory.
library.thinkquest.org /17709/wars/trojan.htm   (252 words)

  
 
  (Site not responding. Last check: )
In the tenth year of the war (where the narrative of the Iliad begins), Agamemnon insulted Apollo by taking as a slave- hostage the girl Chryseis, the daughter of Chryses, a prophet of Apollo, and refusing to return her when her father offered compensation.
He told the Trojans that the horse was an offering to Athena and that the Greeks had built it to be so large that the Trojans could not bring it into their city.
Aeneas, the son of Anchises and the goddess Aphrodite and one of the important Trojan leaders in the Trojan War, fled from the city while the Greeks were destroying it, carrying his father, Anchises, his son Ascanius, and his ancestral family gods with him.
webhome.crk.umn.edu /~sneet/WesCiv/TrojanWar.htm   (4241 words)

  
 Trojan Horse - History for Kids!
Neither the Greeks nor the Trojans seemed to be able to win, until one of the Greek kings, Odysseus of Ithaca, had an idea.
All the Trojan men were killed, and all the women and children were taken back to Greece as slaves.
The Trojan War, by Olivia E. Coolidge (2001).
www.historyforkids.org /learn/greeks/religion/myths/trojanhorse.htm   (603 words)

  
 Trojan War
The legend of how the Trojan War started says the cause of the fight between the Mycenaeans and the Trojans was Helen of Sparta.
The early Trojan houses were built with a stone foundation and clay brick walls.
The Trojan Horse was wheeled to the tall, strong gates of the city of Troy.
library.thinkquest.org /J0112190/trojan_war.htm   (768 words)

  
 The Trojan War
Following the war, the surviving Trojans left behind buried their dead and tried to rebuild the city, but other tribes from Thrace conquered them and prevented the restoration of the city.
The wind shifted to Troy as a result of the sacrifice and Agamemnon sailed for Troy (his daughter was reputedly restored to life by Artemis as her priestess to the Taurians or was secretly replaced by a deer by Artemis to test his determination).
Patroclus was the son of the Argonaut Menoetius and Sthenele, an abducted Trojan princess.
www.marvunapp.com /Appendix/trojanwar.htm   (4088 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Trojan War (Folklore And Mythology) - Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Trojan War, in Greek mythology, war between the Greeks and the people of Troy.
The strife began after the Trojan prince Paris abducted Helen, wife of Menelaus of Sparta.
Zeus and Apollo, although frequently involved in the action of the war, remained impartial.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/T/TrojanWa.html   (405 words)

  
 The trojan war - YouTube - The LEGO Trojan War
He was the mightiest of the Greeks who fought in the Trojan War, and was the hero of Homer's Iliad.
The Trojan War is the main issue of the Iliad by Homer, and its later sequence is described in the Aeneid by Virgil.
HOMER and the Trojan War (Iliad) both killed Greeks by the thousands, either at Troy during the war, or on the sea on the way home.
moreindex.com /mrid/the-trojan-war.html   (1217 words)

  
 Troyan War
The Trojan War is the main issue of the Iliad by Homer, and its later sequence is described in the Aeneid by Virgil.
Through most of the war, because of Achilles' withdrawal, Agamemnon (king of the Achaeans and brother of Menelaus) was unable to penetrate the fortified city of Troy.
The Trojan king Priam and most of his family were killed, Cassandra, his daughter, was raped and taken as slave to Greece, and Helen, whose abduction had started the war, returned to Menelaus.
lib.haifa.ac.il /www/art/troyan.html   (390 words)

  
 Trojan War: The Trojan Epic Wars and Troy
The war was waged against Troy by the Greeks and lasted for ten years.
The war was caused by the abduction of Helen by Paris.
The Death of Hector in the Trojan War
www.2020site.org /trojanwar   (234 words)

  
 History of the Trojan War
Telephus, in the course of the war, was wounded by Achilles.
The Trojan War might not have happened had not Telephus gone to Greece in the hopes of having his wound cured.
After the war, Polyxena, daughter of Priam, was sacrificed at the tomb of Achilles and Astyanax, son of Hector, was also sacrificed, signifying the end of the war.
www.stanford.edu /~plomio/history.html   (1211 words)

  
 MythNET - The Trojan War
This act was the Judgement of Paris, the reason why the Trojan War was fought.
Only one Greek, Sinon, remained behind to tell the Trojans that the horse was an offering of Athena and it needed to be inside the walls of Troy.
The Trojans told this as a sign from the gods and quickly dragged the horse into the city.
www.classicsunveiled.com /mythnet/html/trojan.html   (825 words)

  
 Mortal Women of the Trojan War
Many women were affected by the Trojan War.
The Trojan War turned lives upside down and created a vast array of myths.
Below are just a few of the women whose lives were touched by the Trojan War.
www.stanford.edu /~plomio/women.html   (127 words)

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