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Topic: Troy


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  Troy (2004)
An adaptation of Homer's great epic, the film follows the assault on Troy by the united Greek forces and chronicles the fates of the men involved.
"Troy" is a thrilling ride, one of the year's best and most underrated action movies.
"Troy" takes it's battle sequences very seriously and while they have an epic grandeur look about them, at the heart of the battle - men are dying, men are killing other men.
www.imdb.com /title/tt0332452   (1059 words)

  
  Troy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Troy (Ancient Greek Τροία Troia, also Ίλιον; Latin: Troia, Ilium) is a legendary city, scene of the Trojan War, described in the Trojan War cycle, especially in the Iliad, one of the two epic poems attributed to Homer.
Until the 1988 excavations, the problem was that Troy VII seemed to be a hill-top fort, and not a city of the size described by Homer, but later identification of parts of the city ramparts suggests a city of considerable size.
Troy IX The last city on this site, Hellenistic Ilium, was founded by Romans during the reign of the emperor Augustus and was an important trading city until the establishment of Constantinople in the fourth century as the eastern capital of the Roman Empire.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Troy   (3015 words)

  
 Troy Info - Encyclopedia WikiWhat.com   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Troy (Greek Τροιας) is a legendary city, the location of the Trojan War, as described in the Iliad, an epic poem in Ancient Greek.
The Homeric legend of Troy was elaborated by the Roman poet Virgil in his work the ''Aeneid.
The problem is that Troy VII is a hilltop fort, not a city, and certainly not the city of the size described by Homer.
www.wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/t/tr/troy.html   (1040 words)

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