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Topic: Truman Doctrine


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In the News (Thu 21 Mar 19)

  
  Biography of Harry S Truman
Truman was born in Lamar, Missouri, in 1884.
Active in the Democratic Party, Truman was elected a judge of the Jackson County Court (an administrative position) in 1922.
Truman, after consultations with his advisers, ordered atomic bombs dropped on cities devoted to war work.
www.whitehouse.gov /history/presidents/ht33.html   (587 words)

  
  Harry S Truman — Infoplease.com
Elected vice president in 1944, Truman became president upon Roosevelt's sudden death in April 1945 and was immediately faced with the problems of winding down the war against the Axis and preparing the nation for postwar adjustment.
The years 1947–48 were distinguished by civil-rights proposals, the Truman Doctrine to contain the spread of Communism, and the Marshall Plan to aid in the economic reconstruction of war-ravaged nations.
Truman's second term was primarily concerned with the cold war with the Soviet Union, the implementing of the North Atlantic Pact, the United Nations police action in Korea, and the vast rearmament program with its accompanying problems of economic stabilization.
www.infoplease.com /ipa/A0760617.html   (632 words)

  
  The_Truman_Doctrine
The Truman Doctrine was the impetus for the change in United States foreign policy, from isolationist to internationalists; thus we were drawn into two wars of containment and into world affairs.
The Truman Doctrine led to a major change in U.S. foreign policy from its inception - aid to Turkey and Greece - to its indirect influence in Korea and Vietnam.
Truman's plan for peacetime aid -- The Truman Doctrine -- was unprecedented in history (a sum of more than $400 million) and he faced a hostile Republican Congress through which to pass it.
studyworld.com /The_Truman_Doctrine.htm   (2208 words)

  
  Truman Doctrine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Truman Doctrine was a United States foreign policy announced by President Harry S. Truman on the 12 March 1947 that the U.S. would support Greece and Turkey with military and economic aid to prevent their falling into the Soviet orbit.
The Truman Doctrine was the first in a succession of containment moves by the United States, followed by economic restoration of Western Europe through the The Marshall Plan and military containment by the creation of NATO in 1949.
President Truman made the proclamation in an address to the U.S. Congress on March 12, 1947 amid the crisis of the Greek Civil War (1946-1949).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Truman_Doctrine   (988 words)

  
 Doctrine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Doctrine, from Latin doctrina (compare doctor), means "a code of beliefs", "a body of teachings" or "instructions", taught principles or positions, as the body of teachings in a branch of knowledge or belief system.
In matters of foreign policy, a doctrine is a body of axioms fundamental to the exercise of a nation's foreign policy.
Doctrines of this sort are almost always presented as the personal creations of one particular political leader, whom they are named after.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Doctrine   (385 words)

  
 Harry S. Truman - dKosopedia
Truman (May 8, 1884 – December 26, 1972) was the thirty-fourth Vice President (1945) and the thirty-third President of the United States (1945 – 1953), succeeding to the office upon the death of Franklin D. Roosevelt.
Truman's presidency was very eventful, seeing the dropping of atomic bombs in Japan, the end of World War II, the Marshall Plan to rebuild Europe, the beginning of the Cold War, the desegregation of the U.S. armed forces, the formation of the United Nations, the second red scare, and most of the Korean War.
Truman was a folksy, unassuming president, and popularized phrases such as "The buck stops here" and "If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen." He exceeded the low expectations many had at the beginning of his administration, and developed a reputation as a strong, capable leader.
www.dkosopedia.com /index.php/Harry_Truman   (3000 words)

  
 KWCC Biography - Truman
Truman forced settlements between labor and management in the mining and railroad industries, and allowed substantial wage increases in the auto and steel industries.
Truman’s tough stand against Communism (at home and abroad), his vetoes of the Taft-Hartley Act and proposed tax cuts, his berating of the Republican-dominated 80th “do nothing” Congress, and the president’s celebrated “whistle-stop” tours are considered the important factors in turning the 1948 election in his favor.
Without excessive hyperbole, Truman in his veto message denounced the act as “the greatest danger to freedom of the press, speech, and assembly since the Sedition Acts of 1798.” Truman’s veto of this popular bill was little short of heroic.
korea50.army.mil /history/biographies/truman.shtml   (2016 words)

  
 The Temperament Portrait of Harry Truman
Truman despised dishonesty and was persistently loyal to his friends and associates (unless they violated his sense of right and wrong or deliberately failed in their duty).
Truman gave the famous general a free hand, and if it is to MacArthur's credit that he did his work so well, it is to Truman's that he allowed the general, whom neither he nor his predecessor Roosevelt had trusted or liked, to proceed.
Truman's support for the Marshall Plan and his handling of the Berlin airlift are good cases in point: he knew what was right; his feisty spirit was aroused; the decisions seemed clear.
keirsey.com /personality/Truman.html   (2367 words)

  
 This Day in History 1947: Truman Doctrine is announced
Historians have often cited Truman's address, which came to be known as the Truman Doctrine, as the official declaration of the Cold War.
Truman's address outlined the broad parameters of U.S. Cold War foreign policy: the Soviet Union was the center of all communist activity and movements throughout the world; communism could attack through outside invasion or internal subversion; and the United States needed to provide military and economic assistance to protect nations from communist aggression.
Yet, the Truman Doctrine successfully convinced many that the United States was locked in a life-or-death struggle with the Soviet Union, and it set the guidelines for over 40 years of U.S.-Soviet relations.
www.history.com /tdih.do?action=tdihArticleCategory&id=2604   (481 words)

  
 Who is Harry Truman
The Truman Doctrine, Marshall Plan, and the Berlin Airlift were all tactics used to contain the spreading of communism throughout the world.
Everything that Truman undertook in his foreign policy was the desire to prevent the expansion of the influence of the Soviet Union.
Truman knew that appeasement would not work with the Soviets and he also believed that you had to have a stern hand with the Soviets.
www.auburn.edu /~skippkl/truman2.htm   (787 words)

  
 Harry S. Truman
Quite naturally, Truman was initially preoccupied with foreign policy: the Allied conference in Potsdam, the conclusion of the war in Europe, and then in August, with the decision to use atomic weapons against Japan.
She drew fire from some liberals for supporting the Korean War and for backing the Truman Doctrine, yet it was clear to any astute observer that ER was willing to break with the administration over public policy issues on which they disagreed.
Truman tried to swing the Convention in favor of Averell Harriman, while ER continued to support her old friend Adlai Stevenson – Stevenson won the nomination.
www.nps.gov /elro/glossary/truman-harry.htm   (1128 words)

  
 Harry S Truman — FactMonster.com
Elected vice president in 1944, Truman became president upon Roosevelt's sudden death in April 1945 and was immediately faced with the problems of winding down the war against the Axis and preparing the nation for postwar adjustment.
The years 1947–48 were distinguished by civil-rights proposals, the Truman Doctrine to contain the spread of Communism, and the Marshall Plan to aid in the economic reconstruction of war-ravaged nations.
Truman's second term was primarily concerned with the cold war with the Soviet Union, the implementing of the North Atlantic Pact, the United Nations police action in Korea, and the vast rearmament program with its accompanying problems of economic stabilization.
www.factmonster.com /ipka/A0760617.html   (519 words)

  
 Harry S. Truman   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Quite naturally, Truman was initially preoccupied with foreign policy: the Allied conference in Potsdam, the conclusion of the war in Europe, and then in August, with the decision to use atomic weapons against Japan.
She drew fire from some liberals for supporting the Korean War and for backing the Truman Doctrine, yet it was clear to any astute observer that ER was willing to break with the administration over public policy issues on which they disagreed.
Truman tried to swing the convention in favor of Averell Harriman, while ER continued to support her old friend Adlai Stevenson—Stevenson won the nomination.
www.gwu.edu /~erpapers/abouteleanor/q-and-a/glossary/truman-harry.htm   (1122 words)

  
 Truman Doctrine
Truman soon encountered major problems in Asia, a part of the world the administration regarded as less important than western Europe and less capable of using American aid effectively.
The Truman Doctrine was the beginning of the United States' effort to contain Communism from expanding.
President Truman asked congress for $400 million to strengthen the Greek and Turkish governments by helping the military and economy, and by authorizing the sending of American and civilian personnel to supervise the use of the aid.
www.angelfire.com /nt/trumandoctrine   (352 words)

  
 The Truman Doctrine and the Greek Civil War excerpted from the book Intervention and Revolution The United States in ...
In the name of the Truman Doctrine the United States supplied the military and economic power to enable the Greek monarchy to defeat an army of communist-led insurgents in 1947-49 and won a victory which has become a model for U.S. relations toward civil wars and insurgencies.
When President Truman announced the decision to help the Greek monarchy win the civil war, he stressed that the commitment was prompted by the "terrorist activities of several thousand armed men, led by communists.'' The United States was to use its power to put down violence.
When the Truman Doctrine was launched, some members of the State Department believed that a massive infusion of American power and money could establish a stable, moderate, reasonably democratic government and that the military operations should be regarded as instruments to set up the preconditions for bringing about political and social change.
www.thirdworldtraveler.com /Insurgency_Revolution/Truman%20Doc_GreekCW_IAR.html   (1246 words)

  
 60 years of faulty logic - The Boston Globe
The speech amounted, as one of Truman's advisers characterized it, to a declaration of religious war.
Truman declared that the United States would actively support "free" people anywhere who were resisting either internal or external threats to that freedom.
The occasion of Truman's pronouncement was his decision to militarily support one side in the civil war in Greece, and with that, the deadly precedent of American intervention in foreign civil wars was set.
www.boston.com /news/globe/editorial_opinion/oped/articles/2007/03/12/60_years_of_faulty_logic   (813 words)

  
 PlanetPapers - Truman Doctrine
This is part of the speech Harry S. Truman gave to congress on the behalf of small countries falling to the pressures of communism.
Another major failure of the Truman Doctrine was the involvement we had in the Vietnam war.
In conclusion, people believe the Truman Doctrine was a very bad thing for America, but I on the other hand think that it is what makes us who we are today: The United States of America.
www.planetpapers.com /Assets/4045.php   (1333 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Truman attempted to aid France's bid to hold onto its Vietnamese colonies.
More than a year later, on March 12, 1947, President Truman asserted that henceforth the United States would aid "free countries which are resisting atĀ­tempted subjugation by armed minorities," a policy that became known as the Truman Doctrine.
As a number of states set up communist governments including China in 1949, the Truman administration initiated a policy of containment backed by the Truman Doctrine which was a profession of U.S. support to all non-communist states.
www.lycos.com /info/truman-doctrine--united-states.html   (509 words)

  
 Truman Doctrine
On March 12, 1947, in an address to Congress, President Harry S. Truman declared it to be the foreign policy of the United States to assist any country whose stability was threatened by communism.
The Truman Doctrine was followed by the Marshall Plan later that year.
The Truman Doctrine also aided the French in their pursuit to maintain the Vietnamese colonies in the country now known as Vietnam.
www.u-s-history.com /pages/h1780.html   (833 words)

  
 Truman Doctrine - MSN Encarta
The immediate objective of the policy was to send U.S. aid to anti-Communist forces in Greece and Turkey, but it was later expanded to justify support for any nation that the United States government believed was threatened by Communism during the Cold War period.
Truman Doctrine as part of the foreign policy of President Truman, see Harry S. Truman: Truman Doctrine; United States (History): The Truman Doctrine
Truman Doctrine as a move toward the cold war, see Cold War: The Struggle for Europe; United States (Government): Economic and Military Aid
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761586835/Truman_Doctrine.html   (172 words)

  
 Truman doctrine - SourceWatch
The Truman doctrine emerged from President Harry S. Truman's March 12, 1947, speech before a joint session of Congress in which he "promised help to any country fighting a Communist takeover.
Truman's March 12, 1947, "speech also included a request that Congress agree to give military and economic aid to Greece in its fight against communism.
Harry Truman and the Truman Doctrine, Truman Presidential Museum and Library.
www.sourcewatch.org /index.php?title=Truman_doctrine   (404 words)

  
 [No title]
The Truman Doctrine was part of the U.S. political response to perceived aggression by the Soviet Union in Europe and the Middle East, illustrated through the communist movements in Iran, Turkey and Greece.
Under the Truman Doctrine, the United States was prepared to send any money, equipment or military force to countries which were threatened by the communist government.
In 1968, Leonid Brezhnev, successor of Khrushchev, declared a Russian counterpart to Truman's declaration.
www.lycos.com /info/truman-doctrine.html   (344 words)

  
 Truman Library, Truman Doctrine Activity
President Truman declared, "It must be the policy of the United States to support free peoples who are resisting attempted subjugation by armed minorities or by outside pressures." The sanction of aid to Greece and Turkey by a Republican Congress indicated the beginning of a long and enduring bipartisan cold war foreign policy.
The Truman Doctrine has raised profound questions from historians regarding its origins, long-term consequences, and the relationship between domestic and foreign policy.
However, one thing is for certain, the Truman Doctrine signaled America's post war embrace of global leadership and ended its longstanding policy of isolationism.
www.trumanlibrary.org /teacher/doctrine.htm   (2181 words)

  
 The Criminalization of US Foreign Policy
The bombing of Hiroshima was the initial landmark leading to the formulation of a "preemptive" nuclear doctrine, where nukes are to be used in the conventional war theater.
The foreign policy underpinnings of what is now referred to by Bush officials as the "long war" are to be found in what is known as the "Truman Doctrine", first formulated by foreign policy adviser George F. Kennan in a 1948 in State Department brief.
The Neo-conservative agenda under the Bush administration should be viewed as the culmination of a (bipartisan) "Post War" foreign policy framework, which provides the basis for the planning of the contemporary wars and atrocities including the setting up of torture chambers, concentration camps and the extensive use of prohibited weapons directed against civilians.
www.globalresearch.ca /index.php?context=viewArticle&code=CHO20070201&articleId=4659   (4025 words)

  
 Truman Doctrine
The so-called Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan are particularly glaring examples of the manner in which the principles of the United Nations are violated, of the way in which the organization is ignored.
This is clearly proved by the measures taken by the United States Government with regard to Greece and Turkey which ignore and bypass the United States as well as the measures proposed under the so-called Marshall Plan in Europe.
As is now clear, the Marshall Plan constitutes in essence merely a variant of the Truman Doctrine adapted to the conditions of postwar Europe.
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk /USAtrumanD.htm   (0 words)

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