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Topic: Tungusic languages


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  Language - MSN Encarta
The Tungusic languages are spoken mainly by small population groups in Siberia and Northeast China.
The Austronesian languages, formerly called Malayo-Polynesian, cover the Malay Peninsula and most islands to the southeast of Asia and are spoken as far west as Madagascar and throughout the Pacific islands as far east as Easter Island.
Languages of the Algonquian and Iroquoian families constitute the major indigenous languages of northeastern North America, while the Siouan family is one of the main families of central North America.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761570647_5/Language.html   (1293 words)

  
  Tungusic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tungusic languages (or Manchu-Tungus languages) are spoken in Eastern Siberia and Manchuria.
Jurchen - an extinct language of Jin dynasty.
The Tungusic languages are of an agglutinative morphological type, and some of them have complex case systems and elaborate patterns of tense and aspect marking.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Tungusic_languages   (405 words)

  
 The Tungus Branch of the Altaic Language Family
Tungusic languages tend to have a significant number of dialects, due to the fact that the people who speak them have lived in small tribal communities or clans in relative isolation from each other.
Tungusic languages are agglutinative, which means that each affix retains its form when added to a root or to another affix.
Tungusic languages spoken on the territory of Russia, are mostly written in Cyrillic.
www.nvtc.gov /lotw/months/april/TungusBranch.html   (645 words)

  
 Tungusic languages
Together with the Turk and Mongol language families, these languages form the third main branch of the Altaic family of languages.
The Tungusic languages are divided into a northern and a southern group.
Tungusic language with a literature and a written history.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/tu/Tungusic_languages.html   (50 words)

  
 NationMaster.com - Encyclopedia: Manchu language
The Manchu language is a member of the Tungusic languages of Altaic family; it used to be the language of the Manchu, though now most Manchus speak Mandarin Chinese and there are fewer than 100 native speakers of Manchu out of a total of nearly 10 million ethnic Manchus.
It is an agglutinizing language that demonstrates limited vowel harmony, and it has been demonstrated that it is derived in the main from the Jurchen language though there are many loan words from Mongolian and Chinese.
Manchu began as the primary language of the Qing dynasty Imperial court, but by the 19th century even the imperial court had lost fluency in the language.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Manchu-language   (2461 words)

  
 Tungusic languages: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
The best-known member of this language family, mongolian (), is the primary language of most of the residents of mongolia...
The manchu language is a member of the tungusic languages; it used to be the language of the manchu, though now most manchus speak mandarin chinese and there...
The manchu language is a member of the tungusic languages; it used to be the language of the manchu, EHandler: no quick summary.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/t/tu/tungusic_languages.htm   (619 words)

  
 Tungusic Languages
Tungusic (Manchu-Tungus) languages belong to the Altaic family together with the Turkic and Mongolian language groups, and possibly with Korean and Japanese.
In large part due to the Soviet policy of russification and oppression of minorities, most of the Tungusic languages are in various stages of endangerment and are facing an extremely uncertain future.
The basic vocabulary of most Tungusic languages has little in common with Mongolian and Turkic languages, although all three groups are considered to be members of the Altaic language family.
www.nvtc.gov /lotw/months/march/TungusBranch.html   (958 words)

  
 NationMaster.com - Encyclopedia: Manchu
The Manchu language is a member of the Tungusic languages; it used to be the language of the Manchu, though now most Manchus speak Mandarin Chinese and there are fewer than 100 native speakers of Manchu out of a total of nearly 10 million ethnic Manchus.
The Manchu language is a member of the Tungusic language group, itself a member of the disputed Altaic language family (and hypothetically related to the Korean, Mongolic and Turkic languages).
These efforts were largely unsuccessful in that Manchus gradually adopted the customs and language of the surrounding Han Chinese and, by the 19th century, spoken Manchu was rarely used even in the Imperial court.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Manchu   (4435 words)

  
 WikiMiki.net - Tungusic languages   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
- - an extinct language of Jin dynasty.
One is that the proposed constituent language families (Turkic, Mongolic, and Tungusic in the basic theory; with the addition of Korean and Japanese in extended versions) are genetically or 'divergently' related by descent from a common ancestor, 'Proto-Altaic'.
Chinese was the official language, though periods of Mongol and Manchu conquest saw the arrival of Mongol and Manchu as alternate official languages.
tungusic.languages.en.wikimiki.net   (10356 words)

  
 Turkish language - All About Turkey
Turkic languages are often grouped with Mongolian and Tungusic languages in the Altaic language family.
Strictly speaking, the "Turkish" languages spoken between Mongolia and Turkey should be called Turkic languages, and the term "Turkish" should refer to the language spoken in Turkey alone.
The history of the language is divided into three main groups, old Turkish (from the 7th to the 13th centuries), mid-Turkish (from the 13th to the 20th) and new Turkish from the 20th century onwards.
www.allaboutturkey.com /dil.htm   (924 words)

  
 Tungusic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Tungusic languages (or Manchu-Tungus languages) are group of languages spoken in Eastern Siberia and Manchuria.
Some linguistics constitute them to be part of the Altaic family of languages, together with the Turkic and Mongolian but this theory is not universally agreed.
Manchu language of Manchuria, which is the only Tungusic language with a literary form since the 17th century and a written history.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Manchu-Tungus_languages   (132 words)

  
 Alaskool - Many Tongues, Ancient Tales   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
It is a single well-defined language with four dialects diverging from the main one: Egegik (Aglegmuit-Tarupiaq); Nunivak; Hooper Bay-Chevak, diverging in the direction of Pacific Gulf Yupik; and Unaliq in Norton Sound, diverging in the direction of Siberian Yupik or Naukanski in the Soviet Union.
Southeastern Tungusic, the dominant language group of the Amur region, is in turn divided into two subgroups, the Nanai-Ulcha-Orok and the Udege-Oroch; the Nanai (or Goldi) are numerically by far the largest group.
The languages on the Soviet side, with the definite exception of Yakut and possible exception of some Chukchi, are now spoken by few or none under the age of 20.
www.alaskool.org /language/manytongues/ManyTongues.html   (3421 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Tungusic languages
Tungusic languages (or Manchu-Tungus languages) are spoken in Eastern Siberia and Manchuria.
Jurchen - an extinct language of the Jin Dynasty of China.
The Tungusic languages are of an agglutinative morphological type, and some of them have complex case systems and elaborate patterns of tense and aspect marking.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Tungusic_languages   (421 words)

  
 Saving Languages - Cambridge University Press
Language endangerment has been the focus of much attention over the past few decades, and as a result a wide range of people are now working to revitalize and maintain local languages.
Our own experiences with language revitalization efforts have come primarily through fieldwork in east Asia on several Tungusic languages (all of which are undergoing rapid loss in the number of native speakers), and secondarily through long-term relationships and professional collaborations with fieldworkers and activists in Africa, South America, and North America, particularly the United States.
Third, government policies affecting language use in public (or even private) realms are one of the two most basic forces that hinder (or help) language revitalization, the other being the connection that people make between language use and economic well-being for their family.
www.cambridge.org /uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=0511128738&ss=fro   (1204 words)

  
 Xibe - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
Until modern times, the dwellings of the Xibe housed up to three different generations from a same family, since was believed that while the father was alive no son could break the family clan and to leave the house.
In Xinjiang, descendants of the Qing dynasty military garrison preserve their language, which is an innovative dialect of the Manchu.
Unlike the Manchu language, the Xibe language is reported to have eight vowel distinctions as opposed to the six found in Manchu, differences in morphology, and a complex kind of vowel harmony.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Xibe   (528 words)

  
 Altaic languages
The Altaic family of languages is found mostly around central Asia, having been distributed by the many invasions out of that corridor.
The Turkic, Mongolian, and Tungusic families do have strong similarities in many ways, but some linguists suggest these are due to their forming a Sprachbund, with intensive borrowing from long contact.
To a lesser extent they also resemble the Uralic languages (such as Finnish and Hungarian), and a Ural-Altaic superfamily is proposed.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/al/Altaic.html   (112 words)

  
 YWWI - Manchu language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
The Chinese language, spoken in the form of Standard Mandarin, is the official language of the People's Republic of China and the Republic of China on Taiwan, as well as one of four official languages of Singapore (together with English, Malay, and Tamil).
In the sense that the written language is based on Standard Mandarin and the dialects are mostly spoken but not written, the situation in China is a complex and interesting case of diglossia.
Old Chinese (), sometimes known as 'Archaic Chinese', was the language common during the early and middle Zhou Dynasty (1122 BC - 256 BC), texts of which include inscriptions on bronze artifacts, the poetry of the Shijing, the history of the Shujing, and portions of the Yijing (I Ching).
www.infoax.com /en/Manchu+language   (11877 words)

  
 The Tungusic Research Group at Dartmouth College
The Tungusic Research Group at Dartmouth was established in 1998 with the generous assistance of the Dickey Center for International Understanding.
All the primary researchers of the Tungusic Research Group are currently involved in fieldwork on Tungusic languages.
Information about Tungusic languages and cultures is relatively sparse; what does exist is of variable quality, and some of the best sources are often hard to access.
www.dartmouth.edu /~trg   (485 words)

  
 Andrej Malchukov's personal homepage   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Andrej Malchukov studied Germanic and Tungusic languages and linguistics in Leningrad (St. Petersburg), where he defended his PhD thesis on verbal clause patterns in Even in 1990.
Subsequently, he was a researcher at the department of Altaic Languages of the Institute for Linguistic Research (Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg).
Tungusic converbs and the typology of relative tense, Workshop on Northern Languages, Abashiri (Japan), July 3, 2004; Conference on the Tungusic languages, St. Petersburg, Institute for linguistic research, October 13-14, 2003.
www.let.ru.nl /A.Malchukov/AM_body.htm   (1142 words)

  
 Tungusic languages   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Tungusic languages (or Manchu-Tungus languages) are group of languages spoken in Siberia and Manchuria.
Some linguistics constitute them to be of the Altaic family of languages together with the Turkic and Mongolian but this theory is not universally
The Tungusic languages are divided into a and a southern group.
www.freeglossary.com /Tungusic_languages   (247 words)

  
 Altaic languages - Article from FactBug.org - the fast Wikipedia mirror site
The relationships among these languages remain a matter of debate among historical linguists, and the existence of Altaic as a family is rejected by many.
Its proponents consider it to include the Turkic languages, the Mongolian languages and the Tungusic languages (or Manchu-Tungus).
One is that the proposed constituent language families (Turkic, Mongolic, and Tungusic in the basic theory; with the addition of Korean and Japanese in extended versions) are genetically or 'divergently' related by descent from a common ancestor, 'Proto-Altaic'.
www.factbug.org /cgi-bin/a.cgi?a=824   (414 words)

  
 The Languages of China
The "Chinese language", the set of mutually unintelligible dialects belonging to Han people and descended from a relatively recent common ancestor, is by far the most widely-spoken in China, and Ramsey dedicates the first half of the book to it.
First is the "Altaic family" spoken in the north of China, the Turkic, Mongolic, and Tungusic languages that may or may not be a valid genetic grouping, but which have significant typological similarities.
Language is just what ties it all together, much like the language ties the country together.
www.cheapesttextbooks.com /review-The-Languages-of-China-S.-Robert-Ramsey-069101468X.html   (1412 words)

  
 ORIGIN THEORIES
Tribes that settled in the region of Manchuria and northern Korea spoke the Puyo language.
The process of unifying the Korean language was accelerated in the 10th century when the Koryo Dynasty replaced the Shilla and moved the capital from Kyoungju, the Shilla capital in the south, to Kaesong, a more centrally located capital.
Although the Korean language was becoming the dominant medium in the country, Tungusic, which an aggressive Koguryo tribe had previously carried down to mid-Korea, was influencing the Korean language.
linguistics.byu.edu /classes/ling450ch/reports/korean2.html   (848 words)

  
 [No title]
Furthermore, the sacred hymns of the Zoroastrians, the Gathas, are in an east Aryan language, one closely related to that of the Rig Veda, which dates from the late second millennium BCE.
The written record of Turkic languages begins in the sixth century with the Orkhon stones, the language of these stones is referred to as old Turkic.
Turkic languages of the Kipchak group come to be written during the thirteenth century as the Codex Cumanicus, a Latin-Persian-Kumik dictionary is published.
www.geocities.com /pahlavaan/3.html   (1598 words)

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