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Topic: Turkic


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  Ataturk.com - the Turkic World
It is true, Turkic populations have not drawn intense Western interest or study since the time of the nineteenth century.
That is why, if the Turkic states of today look a bit primitive, especially in their methods of governance, you must realize that they are building on nothing except what they inherited from the Soviet Union, which is a Communist Party.
Then I deal with the authoritarian nature of Turkic states, their love of strong leaders, the inheritance of Ataturk, the mad tyranny of Turkmenbashi [Saparmyrat Nyýazow] in Turkmenistan, and the new but flawed success of the ruler of Kazakhstan.
www.ataturk.com /content/view/44/80   (5593 words)

  
  Turkic
The Turkic pastoral tribes that later became the Yakut, Khakass, Kirghiz, Tuvinians, Nogai (Qazaq), and Altai appeared in Central Asia around 2000 B.C. Prior to that, these tribes had left their settlements between the Dnieper and Don rivers (see map 1) and embarked on a slow, eastward migration across the unpopulated steppe of present-day Kazakhstan.
After arriving in the forest zone east of the steppe, the Turkic tribes came into contact with the local population.
The fact of their continued presence may be confirmed by the occurrence of Turkic loan words in Latin and Greek (see comparative wordlist and map 3).
www.geocities.com /valentyn_ua/Turkic.html   (536 words)

  
  Turkic peoples - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Turkic peoples are (currently some 150 million) Central Asians whose members speak languages in the Turkic family of languages, and their descendants thoughout the world.
Turkic soldiers in the army of the Abbasid caliphs emerged as de facto rulers of most of the Muslim Middle East (except Syria and Egypt), particularly after the 10th century.
In Central Asia, a Turkic warrior caste whose lifestyle was influenced by the Mongols became the aristocrats of the polyglot Turco-Persian culture.
www.bonneylake.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Turkic_peoples   (1965 words)

  
 Turkic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Turkic languages are a group of closely related languages that are spoken by a variety of people distributed across a vast area from Eastern Europe to Siberia and Western China.
The Turkic languages are considered by some linguists to be part of the Altaic language family.
Turkic languages are agglutinative and exhibit phonological vowel harmony.
www.leessummit.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Turkic_languages   (263 words)

  
 Turkic peoples at AllExperts
The Turkic languages are a subdivision of the Altaic language group, and are one of the most geographically widespread in the world, being spoken in a vast region spanning from Europe to Siberia.
In the earliest Turkic dictionary extant, the eponymous hero of the Turks, Alp Er Tunga, is identified with the character Afrasiyab ("Frangasyan" in the Avesta) in Persian literature.
Turkic soldiers in the army of the Abbasid caliphs emerged as the de facto rulers of most of the Muslim Middle East (apart from Syria and Egypt), particularly after the 10th century.
en.allexperts.com /e/t/tu/turkic_peoples.htm   (3916 words)

  
 Articles - Turkic peoples   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Turkic languages belong to the Altaic language group and is one of the most geographically widespread in the world, spoken in a geography spanning from Europe to Siberia.
In the earliest Turkic dictionary extant, the eponymous hero of the Turks, Alp Er Tunga, is identified with the character Afrasiyab in Persian literature.
Turkic soldiers in the army of the Abbasid caliphs emerged as the de facto rulers of most of the Muslim Middle East (apart from Syria and Egypt), particularly after the 10th century.
www.lastring.com /articles/Turkic_peoples   (3341 words)

  
 Turkic people Information - TextSheet.com
The world's Turkic peoples, numbering perhaps 130 million people in all, are the diverse descendants of large groups of tribespeople thought to have originated in Central Asia.
The precise date of their intitial expansion from their early homeland is unknown, but the first known state of the tribe they all became named after was that of the Gokturks (or Kokturks) (Gog = 'Blue' or 'Celestial') is dated to the 6th century CE.
Huns, whose origins go back to 1200 BCE, are also considered as one of the first Turkic tribes by some scholars and it has become possible to be labeled Turkic without having any connection to the Asena tribe who popularised that name.
www.medbuster.com /encyclopedia/t/tu/turkic_people.html   (480 words)

  
 The Turkic Link
Turkic people are those of the ethnolinguistic group that stretches from Europe to China.
The Turkic peoples are geographically the largest group of people in the world, stretching from Hungary to western China, but they are not very large in terms of population -- even Kazakhstan, geographically the ninth-largest country in the world, has a population of only 18 million, which includes only 10 million Kazakhs.
All of the Turkic peoples are pretty relaxed, which can be seen in their lax attitudes towards alcohol and preference for secular government.
www.cgunson.com /sb2004/9.html   (501 words)

  
 TURKIC LOANS IN ENGLISH
Turkic borrowings, which belong to the social and political vocabulary, are generally used in special literature and in the historical and ethnographical works, which relate to the life of Turkic and Moslem peoples.
In the 9-12cc the Turkic words penetrated English also through the Old French[12], which at the time was spoken by all the English aristocracy and their servants and warriors.
The data of the Turkic language dictionary of the Delhian Sultanat of the 16c, composed by Badr Ad-Din Ibrahim, clearly shows the Kypchakian nature of this language, which was spoken in the Northern India[15].
sophistikatedkids.com /turkic/41TurkicInEnglish/TurkicBorrowingsEn.htm   (3527 words)

  
 «THE TATAR GAZETTE»   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The advancement of pan-Turkism is crucial to both the new Turkic states that have been created by the collapse of the USSR and to Turkic minorities within such nations as Russia and China.
While the cultural aspects of Turkic integration do not seem threatening to anyone, a pan-Turkic political agenda causes apprehension in the capitals of countries that are adjacent to Turkic states or have Turkic minorities within their borders.
Once a certain degree of political consolidation of the six independent Turkic states is achieved, the Turkic peoples that still remain under colonial oppression ought to become the focus of attention, with the ultimate goal of liberating all the Turkic peoples and uniting them politically.
members.tripod.com /tatargazeta/eng_099.html   (1151 words)

  
 Verbix -- Turkic. Conjugate verbs in 50+ languages   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Foremost among the Turkic languages is Turkish or Osmanli (Turkey, the Balkans).
The morphology of the Turkic languages is agglutinative; i.e., it offers rich possibilities of expanding word stems by means of relatively unchangeable suffixes, many of which designate grammatical notions.
The Turkic languages mostly lack subordinative conjunctions and relative pronouns, using verbal nouns, participles, and converbs instead.
www.verbix.com /languages/turkic.asp   (318 words)

  
 Turkic languages Summary
The Turkic languages are spoken across Eurasia from eastern Siberia to Iran and from China to Ukraine, but they are concentrated in Central Asia, where groups of two to twenty million are represented; the total number of speakers of Turkic languages exceeds 130 million.
The Turkic languages constitute a language family of some thirty languages, spoken across a vast area from Eastern Europe to Siberia and Western China with an estimated 140 million native speakers and tens of millions of second-language speakers.
For centuries, the Turkic speaking peoples have migrated extensively and intermingled continuously, and their languages have been influenced mutually and through contact with the surrounding languages, especially the Iranian, Slavic, and Mongolic languages.
www.bookrags.com /Turkic_languages   (429 words)

  
 Glossika Store - The Turkic Languages (Routledge Language Family Descriptions)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Turkic languages are spoken today in a vast geographical area stretching from the Balkans to the Arctic Ocean and from Southern Iran to the great wall of China.
Turkic Languages is the first reference book for almost forty years to bring together detailed discussions of the historic development and specialized linguistic structures and features of the languages in the Turkic family.
Seen from a linguistic topology point of view, Turkic languages are particularly interesting because of their astonishing morphosyntactic regularity, their vast geographical distribution and their great stability over time.
astore.amazon.com /glossika03-20/detail/0415082005   (300 words)

  
 Turkic peoples - Gurupedia
Turkic peoples (Turkish peoples) are any of various peoples whose members speak languages belonging to the Turkic subfamily of the Ural-Altaic family of languages.
The world's Turkic peoples, numbering perhaps 150-200 million people in all, are the descendants of large groups of people who originated in Central Asia, in a land known as Turkistan, or Turan, which is the geographical region between the Ural and Altay mountains.
The majority of Turkic peoples from Siberia to eastern Europe have a similar linguistic, cultural and historical background, although their regional history (history of each individual Turkic nation) is different.
www.gurupedia.com /t/tu/turks.htm   (2149 words)

  
 Azeri Turkic language
Azerbaijani is a member of the Turkic branch of the Altaic language family.
It also has Turkic vowel harmony in which the vowels of suffixes must harmonize with the vowels of noun and verb stems; thus, for example, if the stem has a round vowel then the vowel of the suffix must be round, and so on.
Azerbaijani is the least russified of all the Turkic languages spoken in the former USSR, and since 1970 there has been a slow campaign to purge it of Russian words.
www.arizonapersian.com /iranopinion/_disc8/0000016f.htm   (1057 words)

  
 any of various peoples whose members speak languages belonging to the Turkic subfamily of the Altaic family of languages
The Orhon inscriptions, the oldest known Turkic records (8th century), refer to this empire and particularly to the confederation of Turkic tribes known as the Oguz; to the Uighur, who lived along the Selenga River (in present-day Mongolia); and to the Kyrgyz, who lived along the Yenisey River (in north-central Russia).
The Kipchak, a Turkic people who had moved from the Irtysh River southwest across Kazakhstan to establish themselves in what is now southwestern Russia, were destroyed by the expanding Mongols in 1239, and the last remnants of the declining Seljuq empire in Iran were likewise subjugated.
The influence of the Mongol rulers diminished, and real power in Central Asia passed to their Turkic provincial governors, one of whom, Timur, was able to extend his own authority over most of southwestern Asia and parts of South Asia in the late 14th century.
www.azargoshnasp.net /history/Altaic/turkic_people.htm   (858 words)

  
 Iran Turkic-speaking Groups - Flags, Maps, Economy, History, Climate, Natural Resources, Current Issues, International ...
The Turkic languages belong to the Ural-Altaic family, which includes many languages of Soviet Central Asia and western China, as well as Turkish, Hungarian, and Finnish.
The various Turkic languages spoken in Iran tend to be mutually intelligible.
Unlike Indo-European languages, Turkic languages are characterized by short base words to which are added numerous prefixes and suffixes, each addition changing the meaning of the base.
www.photius.com /countries/iran/society/iran_society_turkic_speaking_grou~8965.html   (310 words)

  
 Classification (from Turkic languages) --  Encyclopædia Britannica
The Turkic languages may be classified, using linguistic, historical, and geographic criteria, into a southwestern (SW), a northwestern (NW), a southeastern (SE), and a northeastern (NE) branch.
The earliest linguistic records are Old Turkic inscriptions, found near the Orhon River in Mongolia and the Yenisey River...
They are historically and linguistically connected with the T'u-chüeh, the name given by the Chinese to the nomadic people who in the 6th century AD founded an empire stretching from Mongolia and the northern frontier of China to the Black Sea.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-80002?tocId=80002   (888 words)

  
 Turkic - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Turkic, group of languages forming a subdivision of the Altaic subfamily of the Ural-Altaic family of languages (see Uralic and Altaic languages).
The Turkic group of languages has a total of some 125 million speakers in Turkey, Azerbaijan, Central Asia, and parts of Russia and China.
Turkic delights: Central Asia.(Turkey seeks to increase its influence in the Central Asian Republics)
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Turkic.html   (685 words)

  
 Turkic Branch of the Altaic Language Family
The Turkic branch of the Altaic family is the largest of the three branches in terms of the number of languages and the number of speakers.
The sound systems of Turkic languages share one common feature, namely, vowel harmony, a type of phonological process that involves constraints on what vowels may be found near each other.
All Turkic languages are considered to belong to Category II in terms of difficulty for speakers of English.
www.nvtc.gov /lotw/months/march/TurkicBranch.html   (768 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Turkic languages show close similarities to each other in phonology, morphology, and syntax, though Chuvash, Khalaj, and Yakut differ considerably from the rest.
The earliest linguistic records are Old Turkic inscriptions, found near the Orhon River in Mongolia and the Yenisey River valley in south-central Russia, which date from the 8th century AD.
The Arabic script was generally used by all Turkic peoples writing Turkic languages until the early 1920s, when the Latin script began to be introduced to the Turkic peoples of the Soviet Union.
www.sabawoon.com /afghanpedia/Languages.Turkic.shtm   (614 words)

  
 Turkic languages --  Encyclopædia Britannica   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Chuvash constitutes a separate and distinct branch of the Turkic languages that differs considerably from the so-called Common Turkic languages; it is the only modern descendant of the...
It is spoken in Kyrgyzstan and in the Pamir Mountains on the border between Tajikistan, Afghanistan, and China.
The language belongs to the northwestern, or Kipchak, division of the Turkic languages and is closely related to Kazak, Karakalpak, and Nogay.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9109788   (813 words)

  
 LINGUIST List 2.576: Turkic
It is true that the bolsheviks did not choose to make Ottoman Turkish the standard language in all those areas (as the pan-Turkists would have liked), but I would still maintain that their language policies were better for the people than the czar's.
All Moscow had to do in 1939 (when the Turkic languages had to switch to the Cyrillic alphabet) was not to convene a pan-Soviet Turkic conference (as they had done in 1926, when the Latin alphabet was introduced), with the result that the local people came up with quite different solutions.
The Turkic peoples simply did not manage to develop a sense of unity before they were swallowed up by the Russian empire.
www.ling.ed.ac.uk /linguist/issues/2/2-576.html   (728 words)

  
 Untitled Document   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Khalaj is another Turkic language spoken in Iran and Afghanistan.
Other Turkic peoples in the northern Caucasus are the Karachays, Balkars, Kumyks, Nogais, Karapapaks, and the Turkmens of Stavropol.
Yellow Uighur and Salar are spoken in the Chinese provinces of Gansu and Qinghai.
www-personal.umich.edu /~feyza/link10.htm   (250 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Turkic (Language And Linguistics) - Encyclopedia
Turkish, the official language of Turkey, is the most important of these tongues and has the largest number of speakers, some 50 million, chiefly in Turkey.
The Turkic languages have been assigned to various groupings, an acceptable arrangement being the division into Southern (Turkish, Azerbaijani, Turkmen, and Chuvash), Eastern (Uzbek and Uigur), and Western (Kyrgyz, Kazakh, Tatar, and others).
Like the other Uralic and Altaic languages, the Turkic tongues are characterized by agglutination and exhibit vowel harmony.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/T/Turkic.html   (411 words)

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