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Topic: Turkic languages


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  Turkic languages information - Search.com
The Turkic languages constitute a language family of some thirty languages, spoken across a vast area from Eastern Europe to Siberia and Western China with an estimated 140 million native speakers and tens of millions of second-language speakers.
The Turkic languages are traditionally considered to be part of the Altaic language family.
Geographically and linguistically, the languages of Southwestern, Northwestern, and Southeastern subgroup belong to the central Turkic languages, while the Northeastern, Khalaj language is the so-called peripheral language.
www.search.com /reference/Turkic_languages   (0 words)

  
  Turkic languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Turkic languages are traditionally considered to be part of the Altaic language family.
The genetic classification of the Turkic languages commonly followed today is the one by Samoilovich (mainly based on the development of *d).
Geographically and linguistically, the languages of Southwestern, Northwestern, and Southeastern subgroup belong to the central Turkic languages, while the Northeastern, Khalaj language is the so-called peripheral language.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Turkic_languages   (338 words)

  
 Turkic peoples - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Turkic languages are a subdivision of the Altaic language group, and are one of the most geographically widespread in the world, being spoken in a vast region spanning from Europe to Siberia.
In the earliest Turkic dictionary extant, the eponymous hero of the Turks, Alp Er Tunga, is identified with the character Afrasiyab ("Frangasyan" in the Avesta) in Persian literature.
Turkic soldiers in the army of the Abbasid caliphs emerged as the de facto rulers of most of the Muslim Middle East (apart from Syria and Egypt), particularly after the 10th century.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Turkic_peoples   (2903 words)

  
 ninemsn Encarta - Altaic Languages
Altaic Languages, family of 65 languages spoken by about 167 million people in around 23 different countries, in a vast area of Eurasia extending from Turkey in the west to the Sea of Okhotsk in the east.
Foremost among the Turkic languages is Turkish or Osmanli (Turkey, the Balkans) spoken by about 50 million people in Turkey and surrounding areas.
Altaic languages are generally characterized by an agglutinative type of suffixation, and by vowel harmony (that is, only vowels of the same colouring can occur in the same word); the vowels of the suffixes are altered so that they agree with the colour of the root vowel.
au.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761563293/Altaic_Languages.html   (481 words)

  
 [No title]
The Samoyed languages are the easternmost representatives of Uralic.
Written evidence of the Turkic languages begins with the Orkhon inscriptions of the 8th century AD, found near the river Selenga in Mongolia, and continues wherever and whenever a Turkic population came into contact with one of the higher religions, such as Islam, Judaism, Christianity, or Manichaeism.
Khalkha is the language of the Mongols of Mongolia, with its capital at Ulan Bator.
www.ufomind.com /area51/desert_rat/1995/dr28/rat_28_ural.txt   (1806 words)

  
 Yeni Turkiye Araştırma ve Yayın Merkezi; Geleceğin Türkiye'si bambaşka olacak...
Rather than viewing the Turkic peoples with antipathy, they usually are quite interested in the Turkic languages while they study them; later they fall in love with the peoples and cultures that they study in-country while doing research for their dissertation.
First of all, the language, culture, identity, and history of each of the modern “nationalities” of the USSR was institutionalized on the basis of the Soviet model of nationalities.
Muslim Turkic scholars were studied as contributing to “religious reform”, even though they were also contributing to the development of modern identities and national ideologies and were often interested in educational and cultural reform as well.
www.yeniturkiye.com /symposium.asp?id=14   (2175 words)

  
 Turkic — FactMonster.com
The Turkic group of languages has a total of some 125 million speakers in Turkey, Azerbaijan, Central Asia, and parts of Russia and China.
The Turkic languages have been assigned to various groupings, an acceptable arrangement being the division into Southern (Turkish, Azerbaijani, Turkmen, and Chuvash), Eastern (Uzbek and Uigur), and Western (Kyrgyz, Kazakh, Tatar, and others).
Like the other Uralic and Altaic languages, the Turkic tongues are characterized by agglutination and exhibit vowel harmony.
www.factmonster.com /ce6/society/A0849738.html   (387 words)

  
 Turkic languages --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Chuvash constitutes a separate and distinct branch of the Turkic languages that differs considerably from the so-called Common Turkic languages; it is the only modern descendant of the...
It is spoken in Kyrgyzstan and in the Pamir Mountains on the border between Tajikistan, Afghanistan, and China.
The language belongs to the northwestern, or Kipchak, division of the Turkic languages and is closely related to Kazak, Karakalpak, and Nogay.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9109788   (811 words)

  
 TURKIC LANGUAGES: their contribution in the development of Hindusthani.
The language Urdu/Lashkar Bhasha/Hindustani perhaps started developing seriously as a means of communication from end-12th century AD between the incoming Muslim rulers, soldiers, traders etc. and local population, for use in administration, for trading with native shop-keepers, in harems, where women and attendants were mostly of Hindustani origin.
The objective of the paper is to advance the view that the Turkic languages apart from vocabulary, have contributed much more than is acknowledged, both in the basic structure as well as in the development of Hindustani languages.
Although the influence of the Turkic languages on Indian languages began in all seriousness from 11th century AD onwards to which we will come to later, various Turkic tribes began their interaction with Hindustan much earlier than that.
www.saag.org /papers7/paper681.html   (6255 words)

  
 Turkic Branch of the Altaic Language Family
Turkic languages are a group of closely related languages spoken by people spread across a vast area from Eastern Europe to Siberia and Western China.
The Turkic branch of the Altaic family is the largest of the three branches in terms of the number of languages and the number of speakers.
Languages spoken on the territory of the former Soviet Union have a large number of Russian loanwords.
www.nvtc.gov /lotw/months/march/TurkicBranch.html   (195 words)

  
 Unit 5 - Uralic, Caucasian, and Altaic language families   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Speakers of Altaic languages stretch from northeastern Siberia to the Persian Gulf, and from the Baltic Sea to China, with the bulk clustering around central Asia...
- Languages belonging to the Mongolian branch of the Altaic family are spoken by some 7.2 million people, primarily in the Republic of Mongolia, in the Inner Mongolian Autonomous Region of China, and around Lake Baikal in Siberia...
The Turkic branch of the Altaic family is the largest of the three branches in terms of the number of languages and the number of
www.nvtc.gov /lotw/months/march   (542 words)

  
 [No title]
The Uighur literary language flourished in the 9th-14th century, and the Qarakhanid literary language came into existence in the 11th century.
One notable characteristic of the Turkic languages is vowel harmony.
The Turkic languages mostly lack subordinative conjunctions and relative pronouns, using verbal nouns, participles, and converbs instead.
www.sabawoon.com /afghanpedia/Languages.Turkic.shtm   (0 words)

  
 LINGUIST List 2.576: Turkic
It is true that the bolsheviks did not choose to make Ottoman Turkish the standard language in all those areas (as the pan-Turkists would have liked), but I would still maintain that their language policies were better for the people than the czar's.
All Moscow had to do in 1939 (when the Turkic languages had to switch to the Cyrillic alphabet) was not to convene a pan-Soviet Turkic conference (as they had done in 1926, when the Latin alphabet was introduced), with the result that the local people came up with quite different solutions.
Certainly the militant nationalists of any of the groups will tell you that the languages are completely different (and often that their language is far superior), but this is obviously a somewhat tainted view.
www.sfs.nphil.uni-tuebingen.de /linguist/issues/2/2-576.html   (728 words)

  
 Southeast Asia
Khmer, or Cambodian, is the language of the Khmers.
The Turkic languages, formerly known as Turkic-Tatar, Turkish and Turkish-Tatar, are the languages of many peoples and nationalities of Russia and Turkey, as well as a certain part of the population of Iran, Afghanistan, Mongolia, China, Bulgaria, Romania, Yugoslavia and Albania.
The Turkic languages are the mother tongues of the native populations of Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kirghizstan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Bashkiria, Tatarstan, Tuva, Chuvashia, Yakutia, part of the population of Dagestan (Kumyks, Nogaites), Kabardino-Balkaria, Karachayevo-Cherkesskia (Balkarians, Karachayevites, Nogaites), Stavropol Region (Nogaites, Trukhmens), Moldavia (Gagauzes), as well as Karaimov (Lithuania, Ukraine), Urums (Donetsk region, Georgia), and Krymchaks.
www.east-link.com /seast.html   (0 words)

  
 Turkic. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
The Turkic group of languages has a total of some 125 million speakers in Turkey, Azerbaijan, Central Asia, and parts of Russia and China.
Turkish, the official language of Turkey, is the most important of these tongues and has the largest number of speakers, some 50 million, chiefly in Turkey.
The Turkic languages have been assigned to various groupings, an acceptable arrangement being the division into Southern (Turkish, Azerbaijani, Turkmen, and Chuvash), Eastern (Uzbek and Uigur), and Western (Kyrgyz, Kazakh, Tatar, and others).
www.bartleby.com /65/tu/Turkic.html   (359 words)

  
 Turkic
The Turkic pastoral tribes that later became the Yakut, Khakass, Kirghiz, Tuvinians, Nogai (Qazaq), and Altai appeared in Central Asia around 2000 B.C. Prior to that, these tribes had left their settlements between the Dnieper and Don rivers (see map 1) and embarked on a slow, eastward migration across the unpopulated steppe of present-day Kazakhstan.
In this way, the Turkic and Mongolian languages came to acquire similarities that deceive modern linguists as to the two families' origins (see map 2).
The fact of their continued presence may be confirmed by the occurrence of Turkic loan words in Latin and Greek (see comparative wordlist and map 3).
www.geocities.com /valentyn_ua/Turkic.html   (546 words)

  
 Iran Turkic-speaking Groups - Flags, Maps, Economy, History, Climate, Natural Resources, Current Issues, International ...   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Turkic languages belong to the Ural-Altaic family, which includes many languages of Soviet Central Asia and western China, as well as Turkish, Hungarian, and Finnish.
The various Turkic languages spoken in Iran tend to be mutually intelligible.
Unlike Indo-European languages, Turkic languages are characterized by short base words to which are added numerous prefixes and suffixes, each addition changing the meaning of the base.
www.photius.com /countries/iran/society/iran_society_turkic_speaking_grou~8965.html   (310 words)

  
 yourDictionary Agora language and word forum - Print Page
I'm not an expert on Turkic languages but I've heard that there is a wide degree of mutual intelligiblity among the Turkic languages from Osmanli Turkish in Turkey to Uigyr in western China.
Until recently, the Turkic languages of the former Soviet Union were very mysterious because Russia was a closed society.
Until recently, the Turkic languages of the former Soviet Union were very mysterious because Russia was a closed society.Two Turkic languages that are still hard to find information on are Chuvash and Yakut.
www.yourdictionary.com /cgi-bin/agora/agora.cgi?board=translate;action=print;num=1113003520   (0 words)

  
 Turkic Languages on the Web
Because of political changes in the region, the Turkic languages can be written in the Roman alphabet, the Cyrillic alphabet or the Arabic alphabet depending on the region or era.
Language tags are also suggested so that search engines and screen readers parse the language of a page.
Another option is to compose the basic text in an international or foreign languags text editor or word processor and export the content as an HTML or text file with the appropriate encoding.
tlt.its.psu.edu /suggestions/international/bylanguage/turkic.html   (1435 words)

  
 The U of MT -- Mansfield Library LangFing Altaic
You have reached the page on Altaic languages, which is just one part of the "Language Finger" homepage, which is an index by language to the holdings of the Mansfield Library of The University of Montana.
The language is spoken in the Chuvash Autonomous Republic.
updated 6-9-2004 Karakalpak (Ural-Altaic) belongs to the Central Turkic sub-branch of the Kipchak sub-branch of the Northwestern Turkic sub-branch of the Turkic sub-branch of the Altaic branch of the Ural-Altaic family of languages.
www.lib.umt.edu /guide/lang/altaiclh.htm   (2024 words)

  
 Untitled Document   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Turkic languages, belonging to the Altaic language family, may be classified into four groupings linguistically and geographically:
Khalaj is another Turkic language spoken in Iran and Afghanistan.
Yellow Uighur and Salar are spoken in the Chinese provinces of Gansu and Qinghai.
www-personal.umich.edu /~feyza/link10.htm   (250 words)

  
 The Turkic languages (from Altaic languages) --  Britannica Student Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The term Turkish properly refers to the language spoken in Turkey and to the literary, written forms of that language.
The term used by scholars for the language group it belongs to is Turkic.
Most of the evidence for including the Uralic and Altaic languages in one language family is based on similarities of language structure rather than on a common core of inherited vocabulary.
www.britannica.com /ebi/article-79993   (781 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Some of these dialects and languages are Hindwi, Khariboli, Brij Bhasha, Awadhi, Bagheli, Chhatisgari, Bundeli, Kanauji, Bhojpuri, Maithili, Gujari, Rajsthani and when it was spoken in South it was known as Deccani That these languages are dialects of Hindi as claimed by some is not strictly true.
The Turkic raids began in the first half of 11th century starting with Sabuktgin and the process of establishment of their kingdoms in North & West of Hindustan started from late 12th century.
I believe that even whene languages were imposed, it is not as such the movement of races, as claimed, but only of the powerful elites; military, political or economic.
www.cs.colostate.edu /~malaiya/turkish.html   (6238 words)

  
 Minority languages of Russia on the Net - Turkic languages
Turkic languages - a family of languages spoken by numerous nationalities in Russia, Central Asia and Kazakhstan, Transcaucasia, Turkey, by parts of the population in Iran, Afganistan, Mongolia, China, Romania, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia and Albania.
According to some researchers, the Turkic languages belong to the Altaic family together with the Manchu-Tungus and the Mongolian languages.
The modern literary languages of the Turkic peoples in Russia have been created after the October revolution, first on the basis of the Arab and Latin, since the late 1930's - Cyrillic script.
www.peoples.org.ru /eng_tjurk.html   (0 words)

  
 Evertype: The Alphabets of Europe
The exclusion of such languages from this report is not intended to imply any bias whatsoever against such “immigrant” languages or their speakers.
For each language, first the name of the language is given in English, followed by the original name of the language in its natural spelling, with a transliteration into Latin letters in parentheses where the original language does not use the Latin script.
In some cases, especially in the case of the “lesser-used” languages, this information may have been inferred from the preferred quotation marks used by a “dominant” language in the area in which the “lesser-used” language is found.
www.evertype.com /alphabets   (3504 words)

  
 Verbix -- Turkic languages: conjugate Turkish verbs
Turkish is one of the oldest functional languages.
It belongs to the Turkic branch of the Altaic family of languages.
Like in the Finnish language, the vowel harmony plays a big role on constructing the inflected forms.
www.verbix.com /languages/turkish.shtml   (0 words)

  
 UCLA Language Materials Project Language Profiles Page
The Turkic languages, and the Mongolian-Tungus (Manchu-Tungusic) languages of Siberia and northeastern China are major divisions of the Altaic family or phylum (see Ruhlen 1987).
It also has Turkic vowel harmony in which the vowels of suffixes must harmonize with the vowels of noun and verb stems; thus, for example, if the stem has a round vowel then the vowel of the suffix must be round, and so on.
The many Turkic inscriptions in that area, which date from the fifth to seventh centuries, are attributed to them.
www.lmp.ucla.edu /Profile.aspx?LangID=62   (1024 words)

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