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Topic: Turkmenistan


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  Turkmenistan culture and society informatiom
Trapped in a loveless marriage, he lost his two young sons to illness; later in life his whole body of work was not only confiscated by the Persians but, as he stood witness, the camel on which his precious manuscripts were loaded lost its footing and fell into a river to be swept away.
Though Turkmenistan is predominantly a Sunni Muslim country, the religion is not militantly or strictly enforced.
Centuries-old tribal loyalties are at least as important as Islam; even the most urbane Turkmen retains allegiance to his tribe, while in the more remote regions tribalism dominates to such an extent that each tribe is easily distinguished by dialect, style of clothing and jewellery and the patterns woven into their carpets.
asiarecipe.com /turculture.html   (1530 words)

  
  Turkmenistan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Turkmenistan region soon came to be known as the capital of Greater Khorasan when the caliph Al-Ma'mun moved his capital to Merv.
The October Revolution of 1917 in Russia and subsequent political unrest led to the declaration of the Turkmen Republic as one of the 15 republics of the Soviet Union in 1924.
Turkmen is the official language of Turkmenistan, though Russian still is widely spoken as a "language of inter-ethnic communication" (per the 1992 Constitution).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Turkmenistan   (1345 words)

  
 Geography of Turkmenistan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Turkmenistan is a landlocked country of Central Asia, bordering the Caspian Sea, between Iran and Kazakhstan.
Turkmenistan's average elevation is 100 to 220 meters above sea level, with its highest point being Mount Ayrybaba (3,137 meters) in the Kugitang Range of the Pamir-Alay chain in the far east, and its lowest point in the Transcaspian Depression (100 meters below sea level).
Turkmenistan both contributes to and suffers from the consequences of the desiccation of the Aral Sea.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Geography_of_Turkmenistan   (1821 words)

  
 Turkmenistan - MSN Encarta
Turkmenistan, republic in the southwestern portion of Central Asia, bordered on the north by Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, on the east by Uzbekistan and Afghanistan, on the south by Afghanistan and Iran, and on the west by the Caspian Sea.
Turkmenistan was formerly the Turkmen Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR) of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR).
The Amu Darya, which originates in the mountainous Pamirs region of Tajikistan east of Turkmenistan and forms part of the country’s border with Uzbekistan, and the Murgap, which originates in Afghanistan, are the two largest permanent rivers.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761555783/Turkmenistan.html   (549 words)

  
 Turkmenistan (01/06)
In January 2005 Turkmenistan claimed its current recoverable gas resources to be as much as 20.42 trillion cubic meters (tcm), but controversy surrounding the as yet unreleased certified audit results of Turkmenistan’s single largest field, Dovletabad, casts serious doubts on the verifiability of Turkmenistan’s claims for its total reserves.
Turkmenistan’s 2005 output was an estimated 63 billion cubic meters (bcm); the bulk of which (45.2 bcm) went to Ukraine, Russia and Iran.
Turkmenistan’s declaration of "permanent neutrality" was formally recognized by the United Nations in 1995.
www.state.gov /r/pa/ei/bgn/35884.htm   (2743 words)

  
 The EU's relations with Turkmenistan - Overview
Turkmenistan, with a population of around 4.9 million (although official estimates put the figure at nearer 6 million), is one of the most ethnically homogenous of the Central Asian states, with the proportion of ethnic Turkmens in the population reported to have increased from 72% in the 1989 census to 95% by 2003.
In 2005, the EU was the largest source of imports to Turkmenistan (€451 million), whilst in terms of the export of Turkmen goods, the EU was the third largest trading partner (€367 million) after Ukraine and Iran.
Turkmenistan has also participated valuably in a number of Tacis regional programmes in a number of different sectors, including INOGATE (energy), TRACECA (transport), environmental programmes focusing on water management and the Caspian Sea, as well as the BOMCA-CADAP programmes on border management and drug trafficking.
ec.europa.eu /comm/external_relations/turkmenistan/intro   (2120 words)

  
 Welcome
Turkmenistan has border in the north with Kazakhstan, in the east and north-east with Uzbekistan in the south with Iran and in the south-east with Afghanistan.
Turkmenistan is a democratic, lawbased and secular state, which wields supreme and full authority on its territory and independently pursues domestic and foreign policies.
Turkmenistan is an equal subject of the world community, adheres in foreign policy to the principles of peaceful coexistence, renunciation of the use of force and noninterference in the internal affairs of other states, mutually advantageous development of relations, good neighbourliness, the strengthening of friendship.
www.turkmens.com /Turkmenistan.html   (2958 words)

  
 Worldworx Travel - Regional Information - Asia - Central Asia - Turkmenistan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Turkmenistan is a land-locked country and is bordered in the west by the Caspian Sea, to the north by Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, in the east by Afghanistan and to the south by Iran.
The landmass of Turkmenistan is 488,100 sq km and is comprised (80%) of the mighty low-lying Garagum sandy desert, with sand dunes rising into mountains in the south.
One half of Turkmenistan's irrigated land is planted with cotton and Turkmenistan is the 10th largest of the world's chief cotton producers.
www.worldworx.tv /regional-information/asia/central-asia/turkmenistan   (431 words)

  
 Turkmenistan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Turkmenistan is famous for its carpets and each tribe has its own distinctive gul.
According to a Dutch diplomat the laurel branches refer presumably to the resolution, adopted January 12, 1995 by the General Assembly of the United Nations, in which is stated that the Republic of Turkmenistan is permanent neutral.
Turkmenistan's public was informed that an olive branch, similar to the one on the UN flag, symbolizing the country's neutrality and the peace-loving qualities would appear below the five motifs situated on the flag's left corner.
www.crwflags.com /fotw/flags/tm.html   (893 words)

  
 Services for Americans in Turkmenistan, U.S. Embassy, Ashgabat   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Turkmenistan customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning the temporary importation into or export from Turkmenistan items such as carpets, jewelry, musical instruments, pieces of art, archaeological artifacts, antiques, etc. It is advisable to contact the Embassy of Turkmenistan in Washington, D.C. for specific information regarding customs requirements.
Turkmenistan has a low rate of violent crime, but ordinary street crime is common.
All applicants must comply with this section of the law based on their own situation in Turkmenistan; your sponsorship and your financial status in the U.S. are not sufficient for an applicant to obtain a visa.
turkmenistan.usembassy.gov /amserv.html   (3138 words)

  
 Turkmenistan travel guide - Wikitravel
Turkmenistan is a country in Central Asia with a population of about 5 million, and an area around half a million square km, a bit larger than California or almost the size of Spain.
Turkmenistan traditionally was home to sizeable Russian and German populations, but they largely emigrated to their mother countries following the break up of the Soviet Union.
Turkmenistan Airlines has direct flights to Ashgabat from London and Birmingham, used predominantly by the British Sikh community as a transit point for further flight to India and Pakistan.
wikitravel.org /en/Turkmenistan   (1469 words)

  
 CIA - The World Factbook -- Turkmenistan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Turkmenistan is a largely desert country with intensive agriculture in irrigated oases and large gas and oil resources.
Overall prospects in the near future are discouraging because of widespread internal poverty, the burden of foreign debt, the government's irrational use of oil and gas revenues, and its unwillingness to adopt market-oriented reforms.
Turkmenistan's economic statistics are state secrets, and GDP and other figures are subject to wide margins of error.
www.cia.gov /cia/publications/factbook/geos/tx.html   (1188 words)

  
 Turkmenistan
In addition, U.S. citizens traveling in Turkmenistan should be aware that they may need special permission from the SARF to travel to areas of the country that have been restricted by the Government of Turkmenistan.
American citizens in Turkmenistan are strongly urged to ensure that their visas do not expire and that they register with SARF upon arrival and upon departure.
Turkmenistan customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning temporary importation into or export from Turkmenistan of items such as carpets, jewelry, musical instruments, pieces of art, archaeological artifacts, antiques, protected animals, etc. It is advisable to contact the Embassy of Turkmenistan in Washington, D.C. for specific information regarding customs requirements.
travel.state.gov /travel/turkmenistan.html   (3337 words)

  
 turkmenistan map and map of turkmenistan information page
The Turkmenistan Government is now actively seeking to develop alternative petroleum transportation routes in order to break Russia's pipeline monopoly.
Landforms Most of Turkmenistan is dominated by the flat Garagum (or Kara Kum) Desert (north to south), a sandy, scrubby, arid expanse of land, with very little agricultural potential.
The Government of Turkmenistan has designated many areas throughout the country as “restricted zones,” particularly the border areas next to Iran, Uzbekistan, and Afghanistan, the city and region of Dashoguz, and areas of the Caspian coast.
www.worldatlas.com /webimage/countrys/asia/tm.htm   (845 words)

  
 Human Rights Watch World Report 2003: Europe & Central Asia: Turkmenistan
In May, the daily newspaper Neitralnyi Turkmenistan (Neutral Turkmenistan) canceled its employment contract with its Dashauz correspondent, Elena Mitiaev, after learning that she had intended to attend a seminar in Sweden on democracy and journalism.
Turkmenistan made available to the U.N. its air space and land corridors for the delivery of humanitarian aid to Afghanistan.
Turkmenistan's cooperation in providing humanitarian aid to Afghanistan during the 2001-02 U.S.-led military operation against the Taliban raised slightly Turkmenistan's profile vis-a-vis the U.S. government.
www.hrw.org /wr2k3/europe14.html   (2101 words)

  
 Overview - Turkmenistan Country Guide - World Travel Guide   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
The territory of what is now Turkmenistan provided the bedrock for many of the most powerful empires of their age.
Turkmenistan's harsh desert conditions and terrain mean that tourism has been relatively undeveloped.
Mary, due east of Ashgabat, is Turkmenistan’s second city and lies near the remains of Merv, which was once the second city of Islam until Ghengis Khan’s son Toloi reduced it to rubble in 1221.
www.worldtravelguide.net /country/country_guide.ehtml?o=285&NAV_guide_class=CountryGuide&NAV_Region=285   (295 words)

  
 Index of Economic Freedom
Turkmenistan's economy is 42.5 percent free, according to our 2007 assessment, which makes it the world's 152nd freest economy.
Turkmenistan is ranked 28th out of 30 countries in the Asia–Pacific region, and its overall score is much lower than the regional average.
Turkmenistan's large external debt is due to low export prices and a heavy reliance on imports.
www.heritage.org /research/features/index/country.cfm?id=Turkmenistan   (841 words)

  
 Travel Advice for Turkmenistan - Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade
Driving in Turkmenistan is hazardous due to local driving practices, poorly maintained vehicles and roads and inadequate street lighting.
Turkmenistan is in an active earthquake zone and is subject to earthquakes.
When you are in Turkmenistan be aware that local laws and penalties, including ones that appear harsh by Australian standards, do apply to you.
www.smartraveller.gov.au /zw-cgi/view/Advice/Turkmenistan   (1611 words)

  
 Turkmenistan - Turkmenistan -   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Turkmenistan is a middle-income country with a gross national income per capita of about $1,700 in 2005, according to the estimates of international financial organizations.
Turkmenistan’s top development priority is to ensure that a sound and transparent system of public resource management is in place.
Turkmenistan took an initial step in 1997-1998 in changing the status of most farmers to “lease-holders.” However, in practice, the rural economy continues to operate under total state control over inputs and marketing through state orders.
web.worldbank.org /WBSITE/EXTERNAL/COUNTRIES/ECAEXT/TURKMENISTANEXTN/0,,menuPK:300741~pagePK:141159~piPK:141110~theSitePK:300736,00.html   (1348 words)

  
 Human Rights Watch: Europe and Central Asia : Turkmenistan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
The undersigned organizations strongly condemn the plan to close Turkmenistan’s regional hospitals recently announced by President Saparmurat Niyazov, and urge increased international pressure on the President to ease his stifling oppression of the Turkmen people.
He draws particular attention to the reports on China, Nepal, Burma, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Egypt, and the Sudan, as well as the U.S. practice of "extraordinary renditions" of terror suspects to countries which the State Department condemns for torture of detainees.
Turkmenistan is one of the most repressive countries in the world.
www.hrw.org /europe/turkmenistan.php   (1181 words)

  
 turkmenistan.neweurasia.net
Lavrov’s trip to Turkmenistan comes after a brief stopover in Armenia, a route that takes him on a circumlocutory itinerary around neighbours and through countries whose relations with the West range from fraught to pragmatic all the way to downright hostile.
At the 11th session of the third legislature of the Turkmen Mejlis on Feb. 23, deputies approved the appointment of Yashgeldy Esenov as chairman of the Supreme Court, Muhammed Ogushkov as Prosecutor General, Akhmad Rakhmanov as Minister of the Interior, and Murad Karriyev as the Minister of Justice.
Turkmenistan was one of the few countries in the world where people could not get connected at home, nor were there Internet cafes - only few people from the government and international organisations had access.
turkmenistan.neweurasia.net   (6197 words)

  
 UNICEF - Turkmenistan - Background
Immunization rates in Turkmenistan for the most common childhood diseases are 97 per cent or above, and universal salt iodization has made Turkmenistan the first country in Central Asia to achieve optimum iodine nutrition.
More than half of Turkmenistan’s maternity hospitals are certified as “Baby-Friendly,” accounting for about 60 per cent of all deliveries.
The curriculum is unique to Turkmenistan, and omits or gives short shrift to basic core subjects.
www.unicef.org /infobycountry/Turkmenistan.html   (385 words)

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