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Topic: U.S. invasion of Afghanistan


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In the News (Sun 21 Jul 19)

  
 List of invasions
1979 invasion of Afghanistan by the Soviet Union
1220-1224 invasion of Georgians and the Cumans of the Caucasus, the Kuban, Astrakhan, Russia, Ukraine by Mongols
1224 invasion of the Kingdom of Thessaloniki by the Byzantine Despotate of Epirus
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/L/List-of-invasions.htm   (963 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: U.S. invasion of Afghanistan
Main article: Protests against the invasion of Afghanistan In 2001, a number of small protests against the invasion of Afghanistan occurred in various cities and college campuses across the United States and other countries in the first days after the start of the US-led invasion of Afghanistan.
The officially-stated purpose of the invasion was to target al-Qaeda members, and to punish the Taliban government in Afghanistan which had provided support and haven to al-Qaeda.
Helmand province is one of the thirty-four provinces of Afghanistan.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/U.S.-invasion-of-Afghanistan   (11797 words)

  
 United States invasion of Afghanistan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The United States invasion of Afghanistan occurred in October 2001, in the wake of the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States, marking the beginning of its "War on Terrorism" campaign.
It is estimated that in Afghanistan there are 1.5 million suffering from immediate starvation, as well as 7.5 million suffering as a result of the country's dire situation - the combination of civil war, drought-related famine, and, to a large extent, the Taliban's oppressive regime and the U.S.-led invasion.
Bush stated that at the same time as Taliban military and terrorists' training grounds would be targeted, food, medicine, and supplies would be dropped to "the starving and suffering men, women and children of Afghanistan." [3].
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/U.S._invasion_of_Afghanistan   (6698 words)

  
 Learn more about List of wars in the online encyclopedia.
2001 Invasion of Afghanistan (campaign of War on Terrorism)
2003 Invasion of Iraq (campaign of War on Terrorism)
www.onlineencyclopedia.org /l/li/list_of_wars.html   (787 words)

  
 Operation Enduring Freedom
The short term goals of the military action included the capture of Osama bin Laden and other al Qaeda leaders, the prevention of further attacks by al Qaeda, the end of Afghanistan's harboring of terrorists, their training camps and infrastructure, and the removal of Mullah Omar and the Taliban Regime.
Planning involved not only an evaluation of the enemy situation, but also the history of military operations in Afghanistan and the political and military situation across the region.
US psychological warfare operators had delivered more than 50 million leaflets, and transport crews had delivered 2.5 million humanitarian daily rations, 1,700 tons of wheat, and 328,200 blankets.
www.globalsecurity.org /military/ops/enduring-freedom.htm   (787 words)

  
 Background Notes Archive - Near East and North Africa
Afghanistan is endowed with a wealth of natural resources, including extensive deposits of coal, salt, chromium, iron ore, gold, fluorite, talc, copper, and lapis lazuli.
The U.S. has supported the peaceful emergence of a broad-based government representative of all Afghans and has been active in encouraging a UN role in the national reconciliation process in Afghanistan.
Although informal negotiations for a Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan had been underway since 1982, it was not until 1988 that the Governments of Pakistan and Afghanistan, with the United States and Soviet Union serving as guarantors, signed an agreement settling the major differences between them.
dosfan.lib.uic.edu /ERC/bgnotes/sa/afghanistan9407.html   (5506 words)

  
 U.S. invasion of Afghanistan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It is estimated that in Afghanistan there are 1.5 million suffering from immediate starvation, as well as 7.5 million suffering as a result of the country's dire situation - the combination of civil war, drought-related famine, and, to a large extent, the Taliban's oppressive regime and the U.S.-led invasion.
The United States invasion of Afghanistan occurred in October 2001, in the wake of the September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States, marking the beginning of its "War on Terrorism" campaign.
The officially-stated purpose of the invasion was to target al-Qaeda members, and to punish the Taliban government in Afghanistan which had provided support and haven to al-Qaeda.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/2001_U.S._Attack_on_Afghanistan   (6762 words)

  
 History of Afghanistan since 1992 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The US required the assistance of countries around Afghanistan to provide a route for the attack, but criticism increased as various mosques, aid agencies, hospitals, and other civilian buildings were damaged by US bombs.
In 2001, as part of a drive against relics of Afghanistan's pre-Islamic past, the Taliban destroyed two large statues of the Buddha outside of the city of Bamiyan and announced destruction of all pre-Islamic statues in Afghanistan, including the remaining holdings of the Kabul Museum.
Bin Laden and his al Qaeda group were charged with the bombing of the U.S. embassies in Nairobi and Dar Es Salaam in 1998, and in August 1998 the United States launched a cruise missile attack against bin Laden's terrorist camp in Afghanistan.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/History_of_Afghanistan_since_1992   (1445 words)

  
 Afghanistan
Between the fall of the Taliban after the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan and the success of the 2003 Loya jirga Afghanistan was referred to by the as the Transitional Islamic State of Afghanistan.
Opposition against and conflict within the series leftist governments that followed was immense and the government in danger of collapse the Soviet Union intervened on December 24 1979.
In the spring of 2003 it was that 30% of Afghanistan's 7 000 schools been seriously damaged during more than two of Soviet occupation and civil war.
www.freeglossary.com /Afghanistan   (1875 words)

  
 The U.S. War In Afghanistan Continues by Stephen Kaposi
U.S. forces launched major military sweeps in October and December 2003 and March 2004 to stay in control of the Afghan countryside.
U.S. soldiers, Afghan civilians, and those resisting the U.S. occupation are still dying for a neco-con dream of a worldwide empire.
If the U.S. does eventually secure a "stable" ally and possible permanent military bases, it will only be due to the imposition of military force to crush opponents, war crimes, enormous bloodshed, and substantial human rights abuses.
www.thirdworldtraveler.com /Afghanistan/Afghan_USWar_Continues.html   (1412 words)

  
 Terrorism - Afghanistan and U.S. Foreign Policy
With the 1979 invasion of Soviet troops into Afghanistan, the war between anti-communist rebel forces and the Soviet-backed Afghan government was well underway.
U.S. policy toward Afghanistan, Russia and the region during the 1980s helped, at least indirectly, nurture the growth of anti-American and fundamentalist forces now controlling Kabul, and indeed, even some of the terrorists now being sought by the United States for the Sept. 11 attacks against New York and Washington.
Afghanistan thus became a fragmented country of several independent zones, each ruled by different warlords.
www.cdi.org /terrorism/afghanistan-history.cfm   (1412 words)

  
 U.S. invasion of Afghanistan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Before October 7, there were reports that U.S. and British special-forces soldiers were covertly landed in Afghanistan at some time after September 11, presumably for reconnaissance purposes, and that several of these troops were captured by the Taliban.
U.S. ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad stated the next day that Wazir was killed in the attack, but retracted the statement shortly after.
U.S. and allied Afghan militia intelligence sources soon picked up on this buildup in Paktia province and prepared a massive push to counter it.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/2001_U.S._Attack_on_Afghanistan   (1412 words)

  
 Afghanistan
The United States Department of State reported that chemical bombs supplied by the Soviet Union were used against guerrillas in November 1978, even before the Soviet invasion.
United States estimates were that there were about 85,000 Soviet troops in Afghanistan by late 1980 and about 100,000 by the end of 1981.
One school of thought explains the invasion primarily (sometimes solely) in terms of a short term preoccupation with rescuing a friendly and dependent socialist regime from external attack and internal disintegration.
www.globalsecurity.org /military/world/afghanistan/cs-invasion.htm   (7471 words)

  
 Invasion of Afghanistan
United Kingdom -v- Albania 15th December 1949 was an International Court of Justice case concerning the laying of mines in Albanian territorial waters to prevent the right of innocent passage.
The Leahy Law applies to the Islamic State of Afghanistan and its military arm, the United Front, because the ISA remains the internationally recognized government of Afghanistan.
From the territory of Afghanistan, the Al-Qaeda organization continues to train and support agents of terror who attack innocent people throughout the world and target United States nationals and interests in the United States and abroad.
www.eurolegal.org /terrorism/terror108.htm   (13070 words)

  
 The Soviet invasion of Afghanistan
Afghanistan cost Soviet Union 13.833 dead, 469.685 wounded or sick (of which 10.751 were invalids), 118 airplanes, 333 helicopters, 147 tanks, 1.314 other armored fighting vehicles, 433 artillery pieces, 1.138 radios and command vehicles, 510 engineer armored vehicles and 11.369 trucks.
Soviet forces faced relatively strong resistance and are helped by forces of the DRA (Democratic Republic of Afghanistan-pro-Soviet government).
Soviet weapons were designed for use in different type of terrain and under different doctrine.
www.historic-battles.com /Articles/soviet_invasion_of_afghanistan.htm   (13070 words)

  
 Talk:U.S. invasion of Afghanistan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Invasion is also not entirely correct since the Taliban didn't even control all of Afghanistan when the war broke out (you might say "Liberation" is not correct for similar and related reasons).
Afghanistan War 2001 does seem the better option - it isn't as simple as comparing it to other 'invasions', since the US led coalition does not even really control most areas of Afgh.
Invasion is POV in that it connects the US-led operation with other invasions where the term "invasion" is commonly used, such as Germany invading Poland, Japan invading Manchuria, USSR invading Afghanistan, etc. The US-led operation differs in that it was a joint operation between the Northern Alliance and the US-led coalition.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Talk:U.S._invasion_of_Afghanistan   (13070 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Donald Rumsfeld
During the U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan, Rumsfeld frequently appeared on nationally televised broadcasts to deliver press conferences and updates on the war.
After the U.S.-led invasion and occupation of Iraq, Rumsfeld said he saw no need to send more U.S. troops to Iraq, despite some criticism that the reconstruction and occupation of Iraq were not going smoothly.
From the outset of his tenure as secretary and head of the Pentagon, political observers described Rumsfeld as one of the more hawkish members of the Bush administration, someone inclined to push for decisive military action, first in Afghanistan and later in Iraq.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_681500367/Rumsfeld_Donald.html   (13070 words)

  
 US planned war in Afghanistan long before September 11
One effect of September 11 was to create the conditions for the United States to intervene on its own, without any direct participation by the military forces of the Soviet successor states, and thus claim an undisputed American right to dictate the shape of a settlement in Afghanistan.
It is quite possible that a decision was made at the highest levels of the American state to allow such an attack to proceed, perhaps without imagining the actual scale of the damage, in order to provide the necessary spark for war in Afghanistan.
US Special Forces began joint operations with Kazakhstan in 1997 and with Uzbekistan a year later, training for intervention especially in the mountainous southern region that includes Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and northern Afghanistan.
www.wsws.org /articles/2001/nov2001/afgh-n20.shtml   (13070 words)

  
 American Mortgage & Financial Portal > Mortgage Calculators > Brokerage Firms > Compare Mortgage Loans
Minor party and independent candidates are very occasionally elected, usually to local or state office, but the United States political system has historically supported catch all parties rather than coalition governments.
Buoyed by victories in World War I and World War II and the end of the Cold War in 1991, the U.S. remains the world's most powerful nation-state.
Two of the major traumatic experiences in the nation's history were the American Civil War ( 1861 - 65) and the Great Depression of the 1930s.
united-states.asinah.net /american-encyclopedia/wikipedia/p/po/politic...   (13070 words)

  
 U.S. invasion of Afghanistan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Before October 7, there were reports that U.S. and British special-forces soldiers were covertly landed in Afghanistan at some time after September 11, presumably for reconnaissance purposes, and that several of these troops were captured by the Taliban.
U.S. ambassador Zalmay Khalilzad stated the next day that Wazir was killed in the attack, but retracted the statement shortly after.
U.S. and allied Afghan militia intelligence sources soon picked up on this buildup in Paktia province and prepared a massive push to counter it.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/2001_U.S._Attack_on_Afghanistan   (13070 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Propaganda Article
Text: "They're about to fall!" Names: Haqqani, Bin Laden, Mutawakkil]]In the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan, psychological operations tactics (PsyOps) were employed to demoralize the Taliban and to win the sympathies of the Afghan population.
Leaflets were also dropped throughout Afghanistan, offering rewards for Osama bin Laden and other individuals, portraying Americans as friends of Afghanistan and emphasizing various negative aspects of the Taliban.
Another shows a picture of Mohammed Omar in a set of crosshairs with the words “We are watching”, presumably to convince individuals and groups that resistance to the American forces was futile.
www.ipedia.com /propaganda.html   (3343 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Tommy Franks
Franks was regarded as a “soldier’s soldier.” During the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan, the media often criticized him for being unavailable for questions, but his defenders said he simply sought to avoid the limelight.
Tommy Franks, born in 1945, retired United States Army four-star general who led the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq and the 2001 U.S. invasion of Afghanistan that ousted the Taliban regime and its al-Qaeda allies.
As the head of the Central Command, he led Operation Enduring Freedom, the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan that followed the September 11 terrorist attacks against the United States.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_701610469/Tommy_Franks.html   (565 words)

  
 U.S. in Afghanistan Means Harsher Oppression for Women -- RW ONLINE
Shortly after the U.S. invasion of Afghanistan, U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell self- righteously declared, "The rights of the women of Afghanistan are not negotiable." Life in Afghanistan for women today shows that this was just a lie to justify the crime the U.S. was about to commit.
After the invasion of Afghanistan and the fall of the Taliban, women across the country thought they would get at least some limited freedom.
It was inevitable that the U.S. and its allies would betray and make a mockery of their fine talk about women's liberation because their aim in invading Afghanistan in the first place was to further their own imperialistic interests, to control the region in the service of their global strategic objectives.
rwor.org /a/1219/wtwafg2.htm   (1657 words)

  
 U.S. invasion of Afghanistan - dKosopedia
When the Taliban leader in Afghanistan did not produce bin Laden promptly enough to meet administration demands, George W. Bush authorized covert military action on September 30, 2001.
U.S. troops remain; however, full elections have not yet been held, and the central Afghan's ability to preside over Afghan warlords is uncertain.
Osama bin Laden, who reportedly resided in Afghanistan, was fingered as the responsible party.
www.dkosopedia.com /index.php/U.S._invasion_of_Afghanistan   (165 words)

  
 Yorkshire CND - Anti-U.S. Militants Showing up All Over - 23/6/02
A full-scale military invasion of Afghanistan would prove futile; the correct response was intelligence and police work, not brute force.
Afghanistan, billed only last fall as a triumph for America and President Bush, is now looking less and less like a victory and more each day like the beginning of a long, bloody struggle that could and should have been avoided.
The torch of anti-Americanism is being taken up by the "jihadi" movement - Muslim veterans of the war against the Soviets in Afghanistan during the 1980s - and by a younger generation of militants.
www.cndyorks.gn.apc.org /news/articles/antiusshowing.htm   (860 words)

  
 The U.S. Invasion of Afghanistan, by Richard S. Ehrlich
Presumably, U.S. air assaults would be limited by a need not to obliterate the airbase, and may depend on advance ground troops who could enter by stealth to sabotage key defenses with time-bombs, assassinations and other special forces' teamwork to soften Shindand before the invasion.
During the Soviet occupation, however, much of the desert alongside all of Afghanistan's highways were described as heavily peppered with land mines, which would hamper overland movement by U.S. forces once they are on the ground.
Moscow used Shindand as a strategic base during the Soviet Union's 1980-1989 occupation and war in Afghanistan.
www.orlingrabbe.com /afghan_invasion.htm   (1166 words)

  
 Afghanistan War
In 1979 another coup, which brought Hafizullah Amin to power, provoked an invasion (Dec., 1979) by Soviet forces and the installation of Babrak Karmal as president.
The Soviet invasion, which sparked Afghan resistance, intially involved an estimated 30,000 troops, a force that ultimately grew to 100,000.
Afghanistan War, 1978–92, conflict between anti-Communist Muslim Afghan guerrillas (mujahidin) and Afghan government and Soviet forces.
www.infoplease.com /ce6/history/A0802662.html   (557 words)

  
 RW ONLINE:The U.S. Invasion of Afghanistan: Massacres, Puppets, Warlords and Marines
The plan of the U.S. and the UN was to create a "transitional government" that could rule Kabul (if not the larger country) while it gathered legitimacy from "an emergency Loya Jirga"--a handpicked assembly of feudal chieftains that would be held in the spring.
U.S. rulers are focused on killing those who they have charged with the events of September 11--as an example to the world.
The U.S. portrays a UN army for Kabul as a "neutral" force--while everyone expects such a force would be based on the fascist Turkish military, those genocidal stranglers of self-determination in Kurdistan.
rwor.org /a/v23/1130-39/1130/afghanistan_war.htm   (1775 words)

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