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Topic: Ultra Orthodox Judaism


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In the News (Fri 19 Jul 19)

  
  Judaism 101: Movements of Judaism
Judaism was Judaism, and it was basically the same as what we now know as Orthodox Judaism.
It includes the modern Orthodox, who have largely integrated into modern society while maintaining observance of halakhah (Jewish Law), the Chasidim, who live separately and dress distinctively (commonly, but erroneously, referred to in the media as the "ultra-Orthodox"), and the Yeshivish Orthodox, who are neither Chasidic nor modern.
Conservative Judaism generally accepts the binding nature of halakhah, but believes that the Law should change and adapt, absorbing aspects of the predominant culture while remaining true to Judaism's values.
www.jewfaq.org /movement.htm   (2315 words)

  
  Orthodox Judaism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Orthodox Judaism, as it exists today, is considered by historians to have begun developing as a response to the Enlightenment in the late 1700s and early 1800s.
Orthodox Judaism is composed of different groups with intersecting beliefs, practices and theologies, and in their broad patterns, the Orthodox movements are very similar.
According to Orthodox Judaism, Jewish Law today is based on the commandments in the Torah, as viewed through the discussions and debates contained in the classical Rabbinic literature, especially the Mishnah and the Talmud.
www.leessummit.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Orthodox_Judaism   (2185 words)

  
 Orthodox Judaism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Orthodox Judaism is the direct successor of early Rabbinic or Talmudical Judaism (See Talmudical Judaism), holding that the "Oral Torah" particularly as it is contained in the Bavli (or Babylonian Talmud) has divine authority equal to that of the "Written Torah" in the Hebrew Bible.
In the orthodox tradition practice in relation to circumcision, the dietary laws, the sabbath, the calendar, the role of women, marriage, the use of Hebrew in worship, the study of the Talmud and the rabbinate, is of such importance that it to some extent outweighs deviations in theological belief.
Orthodox responses to the Holocaust were to treat it, like other tragic instances of Jewish suffering down the ages, as an impenetrable mystery transcending human understanding as God transcends it, but no reason to change any of the fundamental principles of traditional Jewish faith.
philtar.ucsm.ac.uk /encyclopedia/judaism/orth.html   (980 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Judaism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Despite this, Judaism in all its variations has remained tightly bound to a number of religious principles, the most important of which is the belief in a single, omniscient, transcendent God that created the universe, and continues to be involved in its governance.
Orthodox Judaism is that stream of Judaism which adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonized in the Talmud (The Oral Law) and later codified in the Shulkhan Arukh (Code of Jewish Law).
While Judaism has always affirmed a number of Jewish principles of faith, no creed, dogma, set of orthodox beliefs, or fully-binding "catechism," is recognized, an approach to religious doctrine that dates back at least two thousand years and that makes generalizations about Jewish theology somewhat difficult.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Judaism   (9269 words)

  
 ultra-orthodox judaism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In other cases, Modern Orthodox leaders are considered to have passed the bounds of religious propriety and condemned for this in especially harsh, biblical terms, since those leaders, unlike Reform and Conservative rabbis, are believed to have the requisite learning and should have known better.
As with the nineteenth century Reform Judaism movement in Germany, the result was mutual recriminations, rejection, and harsh verbal attacks.
On the other hand, secular Israelis (Reform Judaism and Conservative Judaism have always had a negligible presence in Israel), began questioning whether a "status quo" based on the conditions of the 1940s and 1950 was still relevant in the 1980s and 1990s.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /Ultra-Orthodox_Judaism   (4470 words)

  
 Learn more about Judaism in the online encyclopedia.   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Orthodox Jews believe that the Torah that we have today is exactly the same as it was when it was received from God by Moses with only minor scribal errors.
The Role of the cantor in Judaism discusses the role of the cantor (hazzan) as an emissary of the congregation.
Judaism developed into several distinct denominations in response to this unprecedented phenomenon: Reform Judaism and Liberal Judaism, many forms of Orthodox Judaism, Conservative Judaism, and a number of smaller groups as well.
www.onlineencyclopedia.org /j/ju/judaism.html   (3232 words)

  
 Haredi Judaism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
One basic belief of the Orthodox community in general is that it is the latest link in a chain of Jewish continuity extending back to the giving of the Torah to Moses at Mount Sinai.
Before then, the distinctions that are now commonly made between Haredi and Modern Orthodox Jews were moot at best, dividing lines between the two camps can now be drawn, though it is important to recognize that there is a large area of gray between the two communities to this day.
There is a mutual dependency between the two communities: the Modern Orthodox generally respect and adhere to the religious rulings of the Haredi leadership, while the Haredi often depend on university trained Modern Orthodox professionals to provide for needs that members of their own community cannot.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ultra-Orthodox_Judaism   (4899 words)

  
 [No title]
Modern Orthodox Jews were moot at best, dividing lines between the two camps can now be drawn, though it is important to recognize that there is a large area of gray between the two communities to this day.
Orthodox Judaism were seen as potentially threatening to the very continuity of the community.
Conservative Judaism have always had a negligible presence in Israel), began questioning whether a "status quo" based on the conditions of the 1940s and 1950 was still relevant in the 1980s and 1990s.
en-cyclopedia.com /wiki/Ultra_Orthodox_Judaism   (4667 words)

  
 Judaism - FreeEncyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Judaism is based on strict unitarian monotheism, the belief in one God.
Orthodox and Conservative Jews hold that the prophecy of Moses is held to be true; he is held to be the chief of all prophets, even of those who came before and after him.
Judaism affirms that people are born with a yetzer ha'tov, a tendency to do good, and with a yetzer ha'ra, a tendency to do bad.
openproxy.ath.cx /ju/Judaism.html   (4828 words)

  
 Articles - Orthodox Judaism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In the twentieth century, a large segment of the Orthodox population (notably as represented by World Agudath Israel movement formally established in 1912) disagreed, and took a stricter approach.
For example, all Sephardic Orthodox Jews base most of their practices on the Shulkhan Arukh, the 16th century legal index written by Rabbi Yosef Karo; All Ashkenazic Orthodox Jews base most of their practices on the Mappah, a commentary to the Shulkhan Arukh written by Rabbi Moses Isserles.
Orthodox Jews will also study the Talmud for its own sake; this is considered to be the greatest mitzvah of all; see Torah study.
www.worldhammock.com /articles/Orthodox_Judaism   (2051 words)

  
 The Ultra-Orthodox Community and Environmental Issues
The regularly witnessed tearing of foliage from trees for the sukka, rather than cutting it from them, leads to their partial destruction; this may well be a transgression of the law against wanton destruction.
When another Orthodox leader, however, mentioned the beauty of the Alps to Rabbi Hayyim Ozer Grodzinsky (1863-1940) -- one of the major pre-war decisors in Vilna -- the latter replied that a Jew with a beard is even more beautiful.
These authors were told by a modern Orthodox academic living in a mixed Jerusalem neighborhood that his wife had berated an ultra-Orthodox family who regularly left their household waste outside the dustbin.
www.jcpa.org /jl/vp415.htm   (4445 words)

  
 Jews against Israel
They're bound by a conviction, once shared by most Orthodox Jews, that Zionism is an affront to God and that peace won't prevail until the state of Israel is dismantled.
Orthodox Jews believed that exile was a punishment from God for their insufficient faith and that only God could end the exile and bring the Jews back to the Holy Land.
At the core of Orthodox anti-Zionism is an acceptance of suffering.
www.israelblog.org /Articles/Jews_against_Israel.html   (2844 words)

  
 Orthodox Judaism Details, Meaning Orthodox Judaism Article and Explanation Guide
Orthodox Judaism is one of the three major Jewish denominations.
Use of the "Orthodox" label seems to have begun at the time of the rise of the Reform movement in Europe and it was the newly "reformed" Reform Jews who chose the description of "orthodox" as suiting those Jews who chose not to join, and even opposed, the new Reform movement.
Strangely, the word "orthodox" itself is derived from the Greek orthos meaning "straight" and doxos meaning "opinion".
www.e-paranoids.com /o/or/orthodox_judaism.html   (2216 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Jews believe that the Tanach (Hebrew Bible, Old Testament) can not be understood literally or alone, but rather needs to be read in conjunction with additional material known as the oral law; this material is contained in the Mishnah and the Talmud.
Orthodox Judaism, especially Ultra-Orthodox Judaism, is a fundamentalist Jewish denomination, as opposed to Reform Judaism and Conservative Judaism which are theologically opposed to fundamentalism.
All Jews, even the Orthodox, do not read the Tanach in a literal fashion, but most Orthodox Jews read the Mishnah and Talmud in what may be termed a fundamentalist way.
www.informationgenius.com /encyclopedia/f/fu/fundamentalism.html   (1880 words)

  
 Haredi Judaism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Haredi Judaism, or Charedi Judaism, also called ultra-Orthodox Judaism, is the most theologically conservative form of Orthodox Judaism.
The interpretation of the Oral Law is considered as the authoritative reading of the Written Law.
On the other hand, less orthodox Israelis (Reform Judaism and Conservative Judaism who have always had a negligible presence in Israel), began questioning whether a "status quo" based on the conditions of the 1940s and 1950 was still relevant in the 1980s and 1990s.
www.bonneylake.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Haredi   (4775 words)

  
 Judaism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Messianic Judaism refers to a group of evangelical Christian religious movements, self-identified as Jewish, that believe that Jesus Christ is part of God and the messiah.
Non-Orthodox denominations of Judaism recognize Orthodox Judaism as a valid and legitimate form of Judaism, despite theological differences.
Most of Orthodox Judaism, however, does not recognize any form of Judaism as authentic except for itself; many Orthodox Jews view non-Orthodox forms of Judaism as non-Jewish.
usapedia.com /j/judaism.html   (3716 words)

  
 Orthodox and Ultra-Orthodox Judaism
Thus for the Orthodox maintaining practices is vital in order to recall their suffering and wandering, the faith of Abraham that remembers Moses, the Exodus, the destruction of the Temples and all subsequent suffering including the Holocaust.
The Orthodox say that as they encounter contemporary society and its technological life, the Torah and Talmud (interpretations of the Rabbis) must be maintained in and through practices.
They do not because the Orthodox maintain that the written and oral law came to a historical person Moses in revelation, and therefore the commandments must be maintained.
www.change.freeuk.com /learning/relthink/orthojudai.html   (1641 words)

  
 Israel - Orthodox Judaism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Within the Orthodox or dati category one can distinguish between the ultra-Orthodox or haredi, and the "modern" or "neo-Orthodox." At the very extreme, the ultra-Orthodox consists of groups such as the Neturei Karta, a small fringe group of antiZionist extremists, who reject Israel and view it as a heretical entity.
This group is also referred to as "Orthodox Zionists." They have been represented historically by a number of political parties or coalitions, and have been the driving force behind many of the extraparliamentary social, political, and Jewish terrorist movements that have characterized Israeli society since the June 1967 War.
Most Orthodox Zionists have been "ultra-hawkish" and irredentist in orientation; Gush Emunim, the Bloc of the Faithful, is the most prominent of these groups.
countrystudies.us /israel/41.htm   (492 words)

  
 Question 2.16: Why shouldn't I say "ultra-Orthodox", "Reformed Judaism", or "Humanist Judaism"?
In practice, the term is usually used as a disparaging synonym for Orthodox or Chassidic.
Many people outside the Orthodox community mistakenly identify those who wear Chassidic garb (long fl coats, earlocks for men, wigs/kerchiefs for women) as "ultra-Orthodox." In fact, the Chassidic groups are no more or less observant than other Orthodox groups who do not dress so distinctively.
The correct term for the Liberal/Progressive Branch of Judaism is "Reform Judaism", not "ReformED Judaism".
www.faqs.org /faqs/judaism/FAQ/02-Who-We-Are/section-17.html   (392 words)

  
 Ultra-Orthodox Judaism - FreeEncyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
As a result, they often have a complicated relationship with other Jewish denominations, which they consider to be unjustifiable deviations of Judaism.
Most secular historians claim, however, that the ultra-Orthodox are a relatively modern group, dating back to the Enlightenment and emancipation of Jews in Western and Central Europe.
On the other hand, secular Israelis (Reform Judaism and Conservative Judaism which have always had a negligible presence in Israel), began questioning whether a "status quo" based on the conditions of the 1940s and 1950 was still relevant in the 1980s and 1990s.
openproxy.ath.cx /ul/Ultra-Orthodox_Judaism.html   (4441 words)

  
 Haredi Judaism   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Haredi Jews, like other Orthodox JudaismOrthodox Jews, consider their belief system and religious practices to extend in an unbroken chain back to Moses and the giving of the Torah on Mount Sinai.
Before then, the distinctions that are now commonly made between Haredi and Modern Orthodox JudaismModern Orthodox/ Jews were moot at best, dividing lines between the two camps can now be drawn, though it is important to recognize that there is a large area of gray between the two communities to this day.
Reform JudaismReform, Conservative JudaismConservative, and even Modern Orthodox Judaism/ were seen as potentially threatening to the very continuity of the community.
www.infothis.com /find/Haredi_Judaism   (5231 words)

  
 HAREDI JUDAISM FACTS AND INFORMATION
Haredi or Charedi Judaism, often also called ultra-Orthodox Judaism, is the most theologically conservative form of Orthodox_Judaism.
While Haredim have typically been more conservative than their Modern_Orthodox counterparts regarding new practices and rulings on new applications of halakhic concepts, Orthodox Judaism views these types of innovations as consistent with traditionally expounded ''halakhic'' concepts.
Any attempt to force history was seen as an open rebellion against Judaism (see Neturei_Karta for a more complete exposition of this ideology).
www.beatlesfacts.com /Haredi_Judaism   (4860 words)

  
 Middle East Times
The centrist, stridently secular Shinui Party opposed that payment and voted against the bill because it was committed to curbing the religious parties' influence and ability to "milk" the public coffers.
Torah Judaism's presence brings in a touch of Judaism so the package might be more palatable.
It would be "difficult" to get the central committee's approval for co-opting Labor and Torah Judaism because they would pull the government leftward "but I did not say it is impossible", he added.
www.metimes.com /articles/normal.php?StoryID=20041202-113054-4585r   (767 words)

  
 Stephen Pollard • Why us? (part two)
Rabbi Akiva, speaking in the name of Judah the Prince (Bava Batra 125b), cites the description of the proportions of the bier for carrying the Tabernacle in Vayikra...
Conservative Judaism: Shit happens to us, and we need to understand this shit through the prism of tradition without losing touch with contemporary reality.
Reform Judaism: Shit happens not only to us, but to everyone, and may be due to Bush's anti-environmental policies.
www.stephenpollard.net /002043.html   (125 words)

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