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Topic: Unix epoch


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  Unix epoch
The Unix time number increases by exactly 86 400 each day, regardless of how long the day is. When a leap second is deleted (which has never occurred, as of 2006), the Unix time number jumps up by 1 at the instant where the leap second was deleted from, which is the end of the day.
As a result, Unix times such as 915 148 799.50, apparently in the second preceding a leap second, are de facto ambiguous, as are (both de facto and de jure) times such as 915 148 800.50.
The earliest versions of Unix time had a 32-bit integer incrementing at a rate of 60 Hz, which was the rate of the system clock on the hardware of the early Unix systems.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/u/un/unix_epoch.html   (3220 words)

  
  Unix time - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Unix time number increases by exactly 86400 each day, regardless of how long the day is. When a leap second is deleted (which has never occurred, as of 2005), the Unix time number jumps up by 1 at the instant where the leap second was deleted from, which is the end of the day.
As a result, Unix times such as 915148799.50, apparently in the second preceding a leap second, are de facto ambiguous, as are (both de facto and de jure) times such as 915148800.50.
At 01:46:40 UTC on September 9, 2001, the Unix billennium (1000000000 seconds in the Unix epoch) was celebrated.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Unix_epoch   (2791 words)

  
 Unix time - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The standard Unix time_t (data type representing a point in time) is a signed integer data type, of 32 bits or more, directly encoding the Unix time number as described in the preceding section.
Because of this limited range, the epoch was redefined more than once, before the rate was changed to 1 Hz (yielding a range in excess of 130 years) and the epoch was set to its present value.
At 1:46:40 UTC on September 9, 2001, the Unix billennium (1000000000 seconds in the Unix epoch) was celebrated.
www.hartselle.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Unix_epoch   (2479 words)

  
 Jargon File 3.0.0 - epoch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Under most UNIX versions the epoch is 00:00:00 GMT, January 1, 1970; under VMS, it's 00:00:00 of November 17, 1858 (base date of the U.S. Naval Observatory's ephemerides); on a Macintosh, it's the midnight beginning January 1 1904.
Weird problems may ensue when the clock wraps around (see wrap around), which is not necessarily a rare event; on systems counting 10 ticks per second, a signed 32-bit count of ticks is good only for 6.8 years.
The 1-tick-per-second clock of UNIX is good only until January 18, 2038, assuming at least some software continues to consider it signed and that word lengths don't increase by then.
www.clueless.com /jargon3.0.0/epoch.html   (132 words)

  
 Unix Epoch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Unix Time Utc Number Leap Epoch Seconds Day Times Definition The Unix epoch is the time 00:00:00 UTC on January 1 January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars.
In computing, the 'Unix epoch' is the representation of points in time as the number of non...
The Unix epoch is the representation of points in time as the number of non-leap seconds since...
colunn.com /4network/45/unix-epoch.html   (440 words)

  
 UNIX TIME FACTS AND INFORMATION
The Unix epoch is the time 00:00:00 UTC on January_1 1970.
The first edition Unix Programmer's Manual dated November_3 1971 defines the Unix time as "the time since 00:00:00, Jan. 1, 1971, measured in sixtieths of a second".
At 01:46:40 UTC on September_9, 2001, the Unix_billennium (1000000000 seconds in the Unix epoch) was celebrated.
www.palfacts.com /Unix_time   (2692 words)

  
 Unix epoch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
In computing, the Unix epoch (also known as Unix Time Stamp) is the representation of points in time as the number of non-leap seconds since 00:00:00 UTC on January 1 1970, introduced by the Unix operating system, standardised in POSIX, and later adopted by the Java programming language and JavaScript.
seconds after the start of the Unix epoch was 01:46:40 UTC on September 9, 2001, a moment known to some as the Unix billennium.
(1,073,741,824) seconds from the start of the Unix epoch, or exactly halfway between the first moment of the year 1970 and 03:14:07 on 19 January 2038, was 13:37:04 UTC on January 10, 2004.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/unix_epoch   (574 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Unix epoch
There is a problem with this definition, in that UTC didn't exist in its current form until 1972; this issue is discussed below.
In the positive direction, whether this range is sufficient to represent all possible times depends on the ultimate fate of the universe, but it can be expected to postpone overflow long enough for such implementation limits to be abolished.
Those who have to implement or interface to the gory details regularly curse the POSIX committee and the inventor of UTC, seeing the whole affair as a sordid mess.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Unix-epoch   (2367 words)

  
 Unix epoch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
In computing, the Unix epoch (also known as Unix TimeStamp) is the representation of points in time as the number of non-leap seconds since 00:00:00 UTC on January 1, 1970, introduced by the Unix operating system, standardised in POSIX, and lateradopted by the Java programming language and JavaScript.
In fact, some claim that the expiration of the Unix epoch timeframe may cause more damagethan was predicted for the Y2K bug.
(1,073,741,824) seconds from the start of the Unix epoch, or exactly halfway between the first momentof the year 1970 and 03:14:07 on 19 January 2038, was 13:37:04 UTC on January10, 2004.
www.therfcc.org /unix-epoch-59930.html   (487 words)

  
 ..:: Dracon™: UNIX Timestamp Conversion Tool ::..
These calculators are designed to calculate and display the UNIX timestamp from entered data for standard universal time in month, day, year, hour, minute and second format, based on GMT or other timezones.
Click on the related buttons and the UNIX timestamp in seconds will be calculated.
UTC days are mostly 86 400 s long, but are occasionally 86 401 s and could be 86 399 s long (though the latter option has never been used as of December 2006) in order to keep the days synchronised with the rotation of the Earth (or Universal Time).
www.dracon.biz /timestamp.php   (911 words)

  
 jargon, node: epoch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Under most Unix versions the epoch is 000000 GMT, January 1, 1970; under VMS, it's 000000 of November 17, 1858 (base date of the U.S. Naval Observatory's ephemerides); on a Macintosh, it's the midnight beginning January 1 1904.
Weird problems may ensue when the clock wraps around (see wrap around), which is not necessarily a rare event; on systems counting 10 ticks per second, a signed 32-bit count of ticks is good only for 6.8 years.
The 1-tick-per-second clock of Unix is good only until January 18, 2038, assuming at least some software continues to consider it signed and that word lengths don't increase by then.
www.jargon.net /jargonfile/e/epoch.html   (135 words)

  
 Time out of XML-X
NOTE that Unix time is only capable of representing dates between Unix epoch, 01 January 1970 and when it runs out of 31 bits and goes negative, 19 January 2038.
Unix is 1970 and win32 is 1601 so 369 is the number of years (1970 - 1601 = 369).
Unix time of course is left back in the stone age.
xml-x.org /time.html   (1626 words)

  
 The 1 Billionth Second of the 1st Epoch
When Unix(tm) time was being created, a line was drawn in the sand from which all time was to be measured from.
Epoch is centred around +0000, GMT, and hence this click over will be at the same point in time for everyone, unlike New Year's eve which follows the sun around the planet.
Furthermore, its time to think about the January 19 2038 rollover of the Epoch, and avoid the hysteria of Y2K.
www.james.rcpt.to /2001/epoch   (209 words)

  
 Wired News: Unix Tick Tocks to a Billion
That instant will be an anniversary for the Unix operating system: It marks one billion seconds since midnight on Jan. 1, 1970, which is the moment Unix computers recognize as zero-time.
The Unix epoch is midnight on January 1, 1970.
"Unix tells time differently, which means that it does not have a year 2000 problem," writes an anonymous fellow in an article published in Wired Philippines (unrelated to Wired News).
www.wired.com /news/technology/0,1282,46651,00.html   (711 words)

  
 Comments on 5202 | Ask MetaFilter
In UNIX systems, the time is internally represented as seconds elapsed since the stroke of midnight, 00:00 GMT, January 1st, 1970.
To the nerds, this is known as the "UNIX epoch." If this counter gets reset to zero or somehow becomes negative, it's 1969 all over again as far as your computer knows.
UNIX was actually implemented in 1969, but it's first "real" use was in 1971.
ask.metafilter.com /mefi/5202   (1005 words)

  
 Unix Epoch Gateway
Unix Time is represented by a 32 bit whole number (an integer) that can be positive or negative (signed).
Unix was originally developed in the 60s and 70s so the "start" of Unix Time was set to January 1st 1970 at midnight GMT (Greenwich Mean Time) - this date/time was assigned the Unix Time value of 0.
This means that Unix Time spans from Unix Time value of -2147483648 or 20:45:52 GMT on December 13th 1901 to Unix Time value of 2147483647 or 3:14:07 GMT on January 19 in 2038.
unixepoch.com   (393 words)

  
 Unix epoch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Unix epoch is the representation of points in time as the number of seconds since 00:00:00 UTC on January 1, 1970, introduced by the Unix operating system, standardised in POSIX, and later adopted by the Java programming language.
One thousand million seconds after that initial instant was 01:46:40 UTC on September 9, 2001, a moment known as the Unix billennium.
seconds after the Epoch, in the year 2038 (sometime shortly after 03:00 on January 19 depending on how many leap seconds there are between 1970 and then).
www.eurofreehost.com /un/Unix_epoch.html   (340 words)

  
 Unix epoch - Definition up Erdmond.Com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
In this format, time_t will run out of positive integers 231-1 seconds (that is 24855 days, 3 hours, 14 minutes and 7 seconds) after the Epoch, in the year 2038, and thus cannot represent times beyond that point.
109 seconds after the start of the Unix epoch was 01:46:40 UTC on September_9, 2001, a moment known to some as the Unix_billennium.
230 (1,073,741,824) seconds from the start of the Unix epoch, or exactly halfway between the first moment of the year 1970 and 03:14:07 on 19 January 2038, was 13:37:04 UTC on January_10, 2004.
www.erdmond.com /Unix_epoch.html   (399 words)

  
 Unix Review > Epoch to UTC Time Conversion   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Unix time, or POSIX time, is a system for describing points in time: it is the number of seconds elapsed since midnight UTC on the morning of January 1, 1970, not counting leap seconds.
In chronology, an epoch is an instant chosen as the origin of a particular time scale.
Epochs are generally chosen to be convenient or significant by a consensus of the time scale's initial users.
www.unixreview.com /documents/s=9521/ur0703a/ur0703a.htm   (668 words)

  
 Unix epoch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
seconds after the start of the epoch was 01:46:40 UTC on September 9 2001 a moment known to some as Unix billennium.
(1 073 741 824) seconds from start of the Unix epoch or exactly between the first moment of the year and 03:14:07 on 19 January 2038 was UTC on January 10 2004.
The time() function is used in the Perl programming language to retrieve the Unix Also the variable $^T will be set the epoch value at the time the began execution.
www.freeglossary.com /Unix_epoch   (603 words)

  
 Project 2038 FAQ
Unix and Unix-like operating systems do not calculate time in the Gregorian calendar, they simply count time in seconds since their arbitrary "birthday", GMT 00:00:00, Thursday, January 1, 1970 C.E. The industry-wide practice is to use a 32-bit variable for this number (32-bit signed time_t).
Databases using 32-bit Unix time may survive through 2038, and care will have to be taken in these cases to avoid rollover issues.
Some Unix vendors have already started to use a 64-bit signed time_t in their operating systems to count the number of seconds since GMT 00:00:00, Thursday, January 1, 1970 C.E. Programs or databases with a fixed field width should probably allocate at least 48 bits to storing time values.
www.deepsky.com /~merovech/2038.html   (2297 words)

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