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Topic: Urnfield


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In the News (Sat 20 Jul 19)

  
  Theuws, F.: Land and Ancestors   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
The studies include among others: Urnfield symbolism, ancestors and the land in the Lower Rhine Region (Roymans/Kortlang); Urnfield and settlement traces from the Iron Age at Mierlo-Hout (Tol); The archaeology and history of the curia of the abbey of St. Truiden at Hulsel (Theuws); Gift exchange, eternity and landed property.
Urnfield symbolism, ancestors and the land in the Lower Rhine Region, Nico Roymans/Fokko Kortlang
Urnfield and settlement traces from teh Iron Age at Mierlo-Hut, Adri Tol
www.press.uchicago.edu /cgi-bin/hfs.cgi/00/15546.ctl   (315 words)

  
 Celts - France.com
The Urnfield people were the largest population grouping in late Bronze Age Europe and were preeminent from c.
The period of the Urnfield people saw a dramatic increase in population probably due to innovations in technology and agricultural practices.
The spread of iron-working led to the development of the Hallstatt culture (c.
www.france.com /docs/86.html   (671 words)

  
  Glossary
The term Urnfield cultures is used in a special sense for a group of related European Bronze Age cultures in which the above rite was practised.
The idea of urnfield burial is an ancient one in central Europe where cremation cemeteries of the later 3rd millennium B.C. are known in the Kisapostag culture of Hungary and the Cârna culture in Romania.
Over most of the region north of the Alps, urnfield cultures came to an end with the start of the Hallstatt Iron Age in 7th century, while the Mediterranean Islands were incorporated into the Classical world of the Greeks and Etruscans.
archweb.cimec.ro /Arheologie/arch/terms.htm   (2389 words)

  
  Urnfield - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Urnfield culture is found from western Hungary to eastern France, from the Alps almost to the coast of the North Sea.
Towards the end of the Urnfield period, some bodies were burnt in situ and then covered by a barrow, reminiscent of the burial of Patroclus as described by Homer, the burial of Beowulf (with the additional ship burial element).
The numerous hoards of the Urnfield culture and the existence of fortified settlements (hill forts) were taken as evidence for widespread warfare and upheaval by some scholars.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Urnfield   (3042 words)

  
 Urnfield -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
The Urnfield culture is found from western Hungary to eastern France, from the (A large mountain system in south-central Europe; scenic beauty and winter sports make them a popular tourist attraction) Alps almost to the coast of the North Sea.
The leaf-shaped Urnfield (A cutting or thrusting weapon with a long blade) sword could be used for slashing, in contrast to the stabbing-swords of the preceding tumulus culture.
In the lower-Rhine urnfields, leavened (Food made from dough of flour or meal and usually raised with yeast or baking powder and then baked) bread was often placed on the pyre and burnt fragments have thus been preserved.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/u/ur/urnfield.htm   (3960 words)

  
 URNFIELD FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
As the change between the middle bronze_age and the urnfield culture was gradual, this is a matter of definition.
The Urnfield culture grew from the preceding tumulus_culture.
The numerous hoards of the Urnfield culture and the existence of fortified settlements (hill_forts) were taken as evidence for widespread warfare and upheaval by some scholars.
www.witwib.com /?s=Urnfield   (2921 words)

  
 urnfield   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
The Urnfield culture was a central European culture dated between roughly 1300 BC and 750 BC.
As Late Urnfield hoards often contain the same range of objects as earlier graves, some scholars interpret hoarding as a way to supply personal equipment for the thereafter.
Certainly the urnfield culture is found in some of the areas where people lived who were later to be called "Kelt" or "Galatoi" by classical authors.
www.yourencyclopedia.net /Urnfield.html   (2953 words)

  
 Read about Urnfield at WorldVillage Encyclopedia. Research Urnfield and learn about Urnfield here!   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
Towards the end of the Urnfield period, some bodies were burnt in situ and then covered by a barrow.
In Alz, the chariot had been placed on the pyre, pieces of bone are attached to the partially melted metal of the axles.
Côtes du Nord, complete swords were found together with numerous antlers of red deer that may have had a religious significance as well.
encyclopedia.worldvillage.com /s/b/Urnfield   (2818 words)

  
 Origin of the Celts   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
As the name suggests, the people of the Urnfield culture cremated their dead and placed the remains in urns which were buried in flat cemeteries without any covering mound.
The period of the Urnfield culture, like that of the Tumulus culture, was one of expansion, particularly during the first millennium B.C.E. It is during the period of the Urnfield culture that the Bronze Age was at its peek in Central Europe.
Whereas the Urnfield people may justifiably be considered to have been proto-Celtic, their descendants in Central Europe, the people of the Hallstatt culture, were certainly fully Celtic.
www.celticcorner.com /origins.html   (721 words)

  
 Urnfield culture --  Britannica Concise Encyclopedia - The online encyclopedia you can trust!   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
In most areas the genuine Urnfield tradition of flat graves was continued; occasionally, however, the urns were covered by round barrows.
The uniformity of the Urnfield culture and the persistence of certain pottery and metal forms seemingly had great influence on the later culture of the Early Iron Age.
The Urnfield culture first appeared in east-central Europe and northern Italy; from the 12th century BC onward, however, the use of urn cemeteries, or urnfields, gradually spread to Ukraine, Sicily, Scandinavia, and across France to the Iberian...
www.britannica.com /ebc/article-9074485   (1026 words)

  
 Lusatian culture - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The purple area is the Lusatian culture, the central blue area is the Knoviz culture, the red area is the central urnfield culture, and the orange area is the northern urnfield culture.
The brown area is the Danubian culture, the blue area is the Terramare culture and the green area is the West European Bronze Age.
It is contemporaneous with the Urnfield culture that is found from eastern France via southern Germany and Austria to Hungary and the Nordic Bronze Age in northwestern Germany and Scandinavia.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Lusatian_culture   (745 words)

  
 Celt: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com - All about Celt
The Urnfield[?] people were the largest population grouping in late Bronze Age Europe and were preeminent from c.
The period of the Urnfield people saw a dramatic increase in population probably due to innovations in technology and agricultural practices.
The spread of iron-working led to the development of the Hallstatt culture[?] (c.
www.encyclopedian.com /ce/Celts.html   (724 words)

  
 Celt - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
Some scholars think that the Urnfield culture represents an origin for the Celts as a distinct cultural branch of the Indo-European family.
The spread of iron-working led to the development of the Hallstatt culture directly from the Urnfield (c.
The subject of the replacement of the Hallstatt culture by the La Tène culture, the final stage of the Iron Age, and its gradual transformation into the explicitly Celtic culture of early historical times, is complex.
open-encyclopedia.com /Celtic   (2637 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
The Urnfield Culture was adopted by the original habitants of these territories and melded with Veneti into one ethnic community that formed the beginning of the Slovenian nation.
It concerns the continuation of the Urnfield Culture burials, but with a difference, where, in Este Culture the Veneti developed their script and left for their descendants the legacy of invaluable monuments with many inscriptions, mainly in Italy, where the center of the Este Culture was, but in addition also in Slovenia.
It is generally agreed that the spreading of the Urnfield Culture started within the Lusatian Culture, although there is a certain fear on the part of historians (this is of no importance to archaeologists) to name the bearers of this culture, because they know of the background presence of the Sloveneti.
www.geocities.com /ausslokon/prevodrazstavanaptuju.htm   (5912 words)

  
 RealMagick Article: Origins of the Celts by Michael Wangbickler
As the name suggests, the people of the Urnfield culture cremated their dead and placed the remains in urns which were buried in flat cemeteries without any covering mound.
The period of the Urnfield culture, like that of the Tumulus culture, was one of expansion, particularly during the first millennium B.C.E. It is during the period of the Urnfield culture that the Bronze Age was at its peek in Central Europe.
Whereas the Urnfield people may justifiably be considered to have been proto-Celtic, their descendants in Central Europe, the people of the Hallstatt culture, were certainly fully Celtic.
realmagick.com /articles/32/1032.html   (1028 words)

  
 1-Urnfield culture-Phaethon-Fimbulwinter
Urnfields are not provable within the Nordic Circle.
Urnfield culture followed the Tumulus culture and was succeeded by the
Interestingly, the dates for Urnfield are the same as those for Mycenae.
www.braasch-megalith.de /1-Urnfield_culture-Phaethon-Fimbulwinter.html   (1079 words)

  
 e-Keltoi: Volume 6, The Celts in the Iberian Peninsula - Francisco Burillo Mozota, Celtiberians: Problems and Debates
On the other hand, the Urnfield Culture, an agricultural society that buried their people in urns, could be identified by their grooved pottery.
The traditional Urnfield Culture theory is still in use today, although new suggestions - such as incursions from the Atlantic (Alberro 2002, 2003, 2004), or the concept of relations with Iberian peoples during the creation of the Celtiberian culture - have emerged as well.
The presence of the Urnfield Culture in the Celtiberian territory.
www.uwm.edu /Dept/celtic/ekeltoi/volumes/vol6/6_8/burillo_6_8.html   (17726 words)

  
 Archaeology Wordsmith
Such funerary urns were buried in a cemetery of urns (urnfields) and the practice dates from c 1300 BC to c 750 BC.
A small pot with holes in it is often found interred with the urn, which may have been the ritual fire igniter or an incense burner.
The urnfield cultures succeeded the Tumulus culture in central Europe and developed into the Hallstatt iron Age culture.
www.reference-wordsmith.com /cgi-bin/lookup.cgi?category=&where=headword&terms=field   (940 words)

  
 Urnenfelder-Kultur - Urnfield culture (German to English translation glossary) archaeology,Archaeology,Science   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
From this period onwards the line of continuity which leads directly to the historic Celts may be traced from the archaeological evidence.
This is identified by the successive Únêtice, Tumulus and Urnfield cultures of the Central European Bronze Age.
Lars Finsen: The Urnfield culture, using urn fields.
www.proz.com /kudoz/239105   (629 words)

  
 Uniqueness in the heart of Europe - Venetic culture
The Europe was defined by the settlement of a people called Veneti and the spread of the so-called Urnfield culture.
The Urnfield culture was named for its common and distinguishing feature - the funeral urn and the burial fields.
It introduced into the European arena cremation and the use of urns as the means of internment of the dead.
www.thezaurus.com /sloveniana/venetic_culture.htm   (701 words)

  
 Urnfield People
"With the emergence of the Urnfield culture of Central Europe, there appear a people whom some scholars regard as being 'proto-Celtic', in that they may have spoken an early form of Celtic.
As the name suggests, the people of the Urnfield culture cremated their dead and placed the remains in urns which were buried in flat cemeteries without any covering mound.
The period of the Urnfield culture, like that of the Tumulus culture, was one of expansion, particularly during the first millennium B.C.E. It is during the period of the Urnfield culture that the Bronze Age was at its peek in Central Europe.
www.british-towns.net /britain/history/time_line/tl_0160.htm   (186 words)

  
 myArmoury.com - Albion Urnfield sword
I purchased an early version of Albion's Urnfield sword a couple of years ago and I am curious about what kind of bronze it is made of and how it compares to the cutting potential of the original period swords when new.
As received it was unsharpened with a fairly thick edge that I sharpened to a "Paper" cutting edge with no great difficulty.
However, it might be interesting to determine what the cost of a more exact duplicate using original alloy and work hardened would cost as a custom option.
www.myarmoury.com /talk/viewtopic.php?t=1284   (2247 words)

  
 Detailed view: [AMDK 12] The Urnfield and Hallstatt Period settlement "Canal I" and the early Hallstatt cemetery "Am ...
The Urnfield and Hallstatt Period settlement "Canal I" and the early Hallstatt cemetery "Am Urnenfeld" at Kelheim.
On the site "Kanal I" an Urnfield and Early Hallstatt settlement was found that had started simultaneously with the famous large cemetery in Ha A2, flourished in Ha B and ended in Ha D1.
On the site "Am Urnenfeld" an Urnfield settlement and 36 Early Hallstatt burials were found, which most likely formed part of the large cemetery.
www.vml.de /e/detail.php?ISBN=3-924734-74-7   (280 words)

  
 a37cel
Out of these cultural disruptions appeared the Urnfield people of Europe, regarded by modern scholars as "proto-Keltic." The Urnfield name derives from the custom of cremation and burial of the body ashes in urns in cemeteries.
Further support for a derivation from southern Russia is provided by the adoption by early Keltic chieftains of wagon burial, a practice whose origins may be traced in the steppes during the second millennium BC.
Descendants of late Urnfield chieftains appear to have been receptive to the example of the newcomers, for among later Urnfield burials there is evidence of richly furnished cremation burials, indicative of high status
www.world-destiny.org /a37cel.htm   (4916 words)

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