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Topic: Utopian socialism


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In the News (Sat 20 Apr 19)

  
 utopian socialism
Utopian socialism, properly so-called, is the name given to socialist aspiration in the era prior to the development of...
Utopian Socialism is the first current of modern Socialist thought.
This, and the identification of socialism with the working class, would be a central theme of the 1830s and 40s, moving Utopian Socialism away from its initial...
www.jointctr.org /?Category=utopian%20socialism   (204 words)

  
 Utopian socialism at opensource encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Utopian Socialists believed that their ideal societies could be established in the immediate future and strove towards that.
The term "Utopian Socialists" comes from Karl Marx who thought that they lacked historical understanding and felt that they would try to reform Capitalism instead of abolish it.
The term is slightly misleading as the "Utopian Socialists" were never a cohesive group and all followed a different vision of the future.
www.wiki.tatet.com /Utopian_socialism.html   (272 words)

  
 Utopian Socialism Archive   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Links to the writings and biographies of Utopians and Marxist commentaries on them, and material on 20th century utopian movements and the use of utopian and dystopian visions in literature and political polemics.
Justice and social stability were ensured because everyone was assigned to a station in life appropriate to their interests and virtues.
The Terror which was the outcome of such a utopian project has been taken by many thinkers (Hegel, for example, in The Phenomenology of Spirit) as a warning against all forms of utopianism.
www.marxists.org /subject/utopian   (1853 words)

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