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Topic: Uzbekistan


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  Uzbekistan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Uzbekistan, officially the Republic of Uzbekistan (Uzbek: O‘zbekiston Respublikasi or O‘zbekiston Jumhuriyati), is a doubly landlocked country in Central Asia.
Uzbekistan is a dry, double-landlocked country of which 10% consists of intensely cultivated, irrigated river valleys.
Uzbekistan had been one of the poorest republics of the Soviet Union; much of its population was engaged in cotton farming in small rural collective farms (kolkhozy).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Uzbekistan   (4026 words)

  
 A Fact Sheet: Uzbekistan and ADB - ADB.org
Uzbekistan, with its 26.3 million people, is the most populous of the Central Asian republics and one of two double-landlocked countries in the world.
However, Uzbekistan is one of the poorer former republics of the Soviet Union.
Uzbekistan is the 15th largest shareholder among regional members and the 22nd largest overall.
www.adb.org /Documents/Fact_Sheets/UZB.asp   (1558 words)

  
 uzbekistan map and map of uzbekistan information page
Uzbekistan gained its independence in 1991, and after a decade of difficult recovery, now focuses on its extensive mineral and petroleum reserves, and the agricultural potential of the Fergana Valley.
In the far west, Uzbekistan is dominated by vast lowlands, the Amu Darya River valley, the Ustyurt Plateau and the southern half of the Aral Sea.
Attractions Uzbekistan, at one time, was the center of powerful ancient empires and international trade, The cities of Bukhoro, Khiva, Samarqand and the capital city of Tashkent, all once located on the ancient Silk Road, still contain well preserved relics of their Muslim and Oriental history, including stunning mosques and squares.
www.worldatlas.com /webimage/countrys/asia/uz.htm   (910 words)

  
 Uzbekistan   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Uzbekistan was the first central Asia republic to declare its sovereignty and to adopt post-Communist symbols.
Oddly, although Uzbekistan is a predominantly Muslim country, and the crescent is a symbol of Islam, the symbolism for the crescent moon is described as being representative of the rebirth of the nation, rather than its religion.
For Uzbekistan, [cos98] show one of his "suggested" roundels of "classic" blue white green with a crescent charging the inner blue disc.
flagspot.net /flags/uz.html   (683 words)

  
 Uzbekistan (07/05)
Uzbekistan had been one of the poorest republics of the Soviet Union; much of its population was engaged in cotton farming in small rural communities.
Uzbekistan is the world's seventh-largest producer, mining about 80 tons per annum, and holds the fourth-largest reserves in the world.
Uzbekistan is a strong supporter of U.S. military actions in Afghanistan and Iraq and of the global war against terror.
www.state.gov /r/pa/ei/bgn/2924.htm   (5330 words)

  
 The EU's relations with Uzbekistan - Overview
Basic human rights are also not applied in Uzbekistan, with reports abounding on alarming incidents in the country’s prisons (torture of detainees, deaths in custody) and on the increasing number of detentions of pious Muslims and their families who practice their religion outside of state control.
Uzbekistan’s bilateral relations with the Kyrgyz Republic have, however, worsened still further since May 2005 as a result of the latter’s refusal to return some 453 refugees who fled across the border after the Andijan uprising, and who Uzbekistan claim were amongst the architects of the rebellion.
Uzbekistan’s economy showed a marked increase in growth rate in 2004, with official figures suggesting that GDP grew by 7.7% during the year, compared with an annual average of just 4.3% over the previous 5 years.
ec.europa.eu /comm/external_relations/uzbekistan/intro/index.htm   (3062 words)

  
 Uzbekistan and Cities - Uzbekistan Information, Pictures, History, and Maps
Uzbekistan cities including Samarkand, Bukhara, Khiva, Shakhrisabz and Tashkent live on in the imagination of the West as symbols of oriental beauty and mystery.
One of the oldest cities of Uzbekistan and in the world is Samarkand, established during the middle of the first century BC under the name Marakanda and later known as Afrosiab.
The settlement of Bukhara in Uzbekistan dates back to the 8th century when it was for 200 years the center of an expanding Islamic kingdom and prospered as a trade and intellectual center for Central Asia.
www.advantour.com /uzbekistan   (682 words)

  
 About Uzbekistan :: Business & Travel. Uzbekistan information. Uzbekistan history. Uzbekistan pictures. Map of ...
The Republic of Uzbekistan is situated in the central part of Central Asia between two rivers: Amudarya and Syrdarya.
Uzbekistan borders Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan, Tadjikistan, and Afghanistan in the South.
Uzbekistan is a member of the executive council of WTO.
www.orexca.com /uzbekistan.shtml   (1674 words)

  
 Uzbekistan: Torture Death in Prison (Human Rights Watch Press release, New York, June 3, 2003)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Otamaza Gafarov was due to be released in September from Chirchik prison in northern Uzbekistan.
The memorandum certifies that Uzbekistan made overall progress in meeting its human rights and democracy commitments under the “Declaration on the Strategic Partnership and Cooperation Framework” that the two countries signed in March 2002.
The March 2002 declaration committed Uzbekistan to ensuring a “strong and open civil society,” “respect for human rights and freedoms,” a “genuine multi-party system,” “free and fair elections,” “political pluralism, diversity of opinions and the freedom to express them,” “the independence of the media” and “independence of the courts.”
www.hrw.org /press/2003/06/uzbek060303.htm   (829 words)

  
 Uzbekistan — Infoplease.com
Uzbekistan is situated in central Asia between the Amu Darya and Syr Darya Rivers, the Aral Sea, and the slopes of the Tien Shan Mountains.
The Uzbekistan land was once part of the ancient Persian Empire and was later conquered by Alexander the Great in the 4th century B.C. During the 8th century, the nomadic Turkic tribes living there were converted to Islam by invading Arab forces who dominated the area.
In 2001, Uzbekistan provided the U.S. and UK with a base to fight against Taliban and al-Qaeda forces in neighboring Afghanistan and became the United States' main regional partner in the war on terror.
www.infoplease.com /ipa/A0108128.html   (1127 words)

  
 The Memory Hole > Senior US Officials Cozy up to Dictator Who Boils People Alive
Uzbekistan President Islam Karimov visited the US in March 2002, where he was warmly greeted by President Bush and Rumsfeld.
Muzaffar Avazov and Mr Khusniddin Alimov, allegedly as a result of torture, and recalled the obligations of Uzbekistan in accordance with the UN Convention against Torture, to which it is a party.
Van Boven is wrapping up a two-week visit to Uzbekistan during which he talked with dozens of people who said they had been tortured by the police or the secret services.
www.thememoryhole.org /pol/us-and-uz.htm   (822 words)

  
 Preamble
State power in the Republic of Uzbekistan shall be exercised in the interests of the people and solely by the bodies empowered therefore by the Constitution of the Republic of Uzbekistan and the laws passed on its basis.
Citizenship in the Republic of Uzbekistan shall be equal for all regardless of the grounds of its acquisition.
One of the Vice-Chairmen of the Oliy Majlis, a deputy of the Oliy Majlis of the Republic of Uzbekistan, shall represent Karakalpakstan.
www.cmseducation.org /wconsts/uzbekistan.html   (7109 words)

  
 About Uzbekistan
The new country appeared on world map and its priorities were to establish a free democratic society and to develop a market economy.
The embassies of Uzbekistan operate in 25 countries of the world and its consulates 10 countries.
Uzbekistan is developing its co-operation with well-known international organizations such as the EU, OSCE, NATO and is strengthening mutually beneficial bilateral relations with many countries of Europe, America, Asia, Africa, and the countries of the CIS.
www.uzbekistan.org /uzbekistan   (270 words)

  
 Uzbekistan
Uzbekistan no longer allows the Peace Corps to operate and has ended the U.S. military presence in the country.
Supporters of terrorist groups such as the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, Al-Qaida, the Islamic Jihad Union, and the Eastern Turkistan Islamic Movement are active in the region.
Americans traveling to or remaining in Uzbekistan are strongly urged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department's travel registration website, https://travelregistration.state.gov, and to obtain updated information on travel and security within Uzbekistan.
travel.state.gov /travel/cis_pa_tw/tw/tw_2533.html   (822 words)

  
 BBC NEWS | World | Asia-Pacific | Country profiles | Country profile: Uzbekistan
Uzbekistan is the most populous Central Asian country and has the largest armed forces.
Uzbekistan is one of the world's biggest producers of cotton and is rich in natural resources, including oil, gas and gold.
Mr Karimov was born in 1938 in the central Uzbek town of Samarkand and is an economist by profession.
news.bbc.co.uk /1/hi/world/asia-pacific/country_profiles/1238242.stm   (1060 words)

  
 Politics of Uzbekistan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Politics of Uzbekistan takes place in a framework of a presidential republic, whereby the President of Uzbekistan is both head of state and head of government.
Following the failure of the coup against the government of Mikhail Gorbachev in Moscow in August 1991, Uzbekistan's Supreme Soviet declared the independence of the republic, henceforth to be known as the Republic of Uzbekistan.
Birlik, the original opposition party formed by intellectuals in 1989, was banned for allegedly subversive activities, establishing the Karimov regime's dominant rationalization for increased authoritarianism: Islamic fundamentalism threatened to overthrow the secular state and establish an Islamic regime similar to that in Iran.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Politics_of_Uzbekistan   (2169 words)

  
 UNDP in Uzbekistan / Home Page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Uzbekistan is a doubly landlocked country in Central Asia.
During the years of independence, while creating a new nation, Uzbekistan had to re-invent itself economically, having lost the traditional trade links of the Soviet states and the subsidies from Moscow.
However, Uzbekistan succeeded in maintaining the main indicators at acceptable rates, as compared to most CIS countries.
www.undp.uz   (227 words)

  
 Uzbekistan News.Net
Stunning architecture, particularly in the cities of Bukhara, Samarkand and Khiva; interesting desert and mountain scenery; and a society in transition in a faraway part of the world are the main attractions of Uzbekistan.
Uzbekistan News.Net is part of an international network of news sites, dedicated to the major regions, countries and cities of the world.
Links to Uzbekistan sports sites, and a regional map are also features of our site, and we regularly provide polls of general interest.
www.uzbekistannews.net   (1041 words)

  
 USAID Europe and Eurasia: Uzbekistan Country Page
Uzbekistan is the most populous country in Central Asia and is situated in the geographic heart of the region, bordered by the four other Central Asian republics and Afghanistan.
Uzbekistan suddenly found itself on the frontline of the War on Terrorism and increased strategic importance to the stability of Central Asia.
Uzbekistan aspires to regional leadership and continues to be key in maintaining security in Central Asia.
www.usaid.gov /locations/europe_eurasia/car/uzpage.html   (593 words)

  
 Ethnologue report for Uzbekistan
Uzbekistan, Bukhara Province; middle and lower Zerafshan Valley in Samarkand Province, and a few in Katta-Kurgan town.
Removed from southern shore of Crimean Peninsula to Uzbekistan in 1944.
Uzbekistan and throughout Asian republics of the former USSR.
www.ethnologue.com /show_country.asp?name=Uzbekistan   (254 words)

  
 Intercountry Adoption Uzbekistan
Adopting in Uzbekistan is very difficult, and the Embassy is aware of only one adoption agency that has been able to process two adoptions since 2003.
Adoption is a sensitive issue in Uzbekistan, and some Uzbek officials are not in favor of foreign adoptions.
Individuals wishing to adopt in Uzbekistan, therefore, may face unexpected opposition, even when a case has been fully processed and the adoption is ready to be formalized.
travel.state.gov /family/adoption/country/country_347.html   (1792 words)

  
 Registan.net » Uzbekistan
First it was the US showing up in Uzbekistan making noises indicating a renewal of ties may be on the horizon.
Uzbekistan seems to trail not only Kazakhstan —; which is now Central Asia’s wealthiest country —; but others as well.
One of the reasons there is such a lack of understanding of Central Asia and countries like Uzbekistan may well spring from the shoddy reporting on the region from the mainstream media.
www.registan.net /?cat=1   (979 words)

  
 U.S. Discusses Policies Toward Uzbekistan After Andijan Violence - US Department of State
Asked whether there is any consideration given to suspending investment in Uzbekistan, Logsdon said the United States is looking hard at its “assistance programs and cooperation in all areas of the bilateral relationship” but is not encouraging U.S. companies to stop investing in Uzbekistan.
Following the 2004 decision not to certify Uzbekistan, the United States cut assistance to the Uzbek central government but was still able to provide support for nongovernmental programs that benefited the people of Uzbekistan.
On the decision by the Peace Corps to withdraw from Uzbekistan after that government failed to renew the visas of the 52 volunteers and country director, Logsdon said the United States was “disappointed that the government of Uzbekistan took this step.
usinfo.state.gov /eur/Archive/2005/Jun/08-501312.html   (3118 words)

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