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Topic: Vasili III of Russia


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In the News (Sat 21 Oct 17)

  
  Vasili III of Russia Biography
Grand Prince Vasili III Ivanovitch of Vladimir (Васили III Иванович; March 25, 1479 - December 3, 1533) was a tsar of Russia (1505 - 1533).
Vasili III continued the policies of his father Ivan III and spent most of his reign consolidating Ivan's gains.
Vasili ended the surviving autonomous institutions of his new provinces and was also a great builder constructing a number of churches throughout Russia.
www.biographybase.com /biography/Vasili_III_of_Russia.html   (88 words)

  
 Vasili III of Russia - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Vasili III Ivanovich (Russian: Василий III Иванович, also Basil) (March 251479–December 31533) was the Grand Prince of Moscow from 1505 to 1533.
Vasili annexed the last surviving autonomous provinces: Pskov in 1510, appanage of Volokolamsk in 1513, principalities of Ryazan in 1521 and Novgorod-Seversky in 1522.
During the reign of Vasili III, the gentry's landownership increased; authorities were actively trying to limit immunities and privileges of boyars and nobility.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Vasili_III_of_Russia   (435 words)

  
 Alexander III of Russia Summary
Alexander III (1845-1894) was emperor of Russia from 1881 to 1894.
Alexander III is known as the "czar peacemaker" because under his rule the empire remained at peace except for minor, although costly, military expeditions in central Asia.
In his opinion Russia was to be saved from anarchical disorders and revolutionary agitation, not by the parliamentary institutions and so-called liberalism of western Europe, but by the three principles which the elder generation of the Slavophils systematically recommended—nationality, Eastern Orthodoxy and autocracy.
www.bookrags.com /Alexander_III_of_Russia   (2265 words)

  
  CalendarHome.com - - Calendar Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Vasili III Ivanovich (Russian: Василий III Иванович, also Basil) (March 25, 1479 – December 3, 1533, Moscow) was the Grand Prince of Moscow from 1505 to 1533.
Vasili annexed the last surviving autonomous provinces: Pskov in 1510, appanage of Volokolamsk in 1513, principalities of Ryazan in 1521 and Novgorod-Seversky in 1522.
During the reign of Vasili III, the gentry's landownership increased; authorities were actively trying to limit immunities and privileges of boyars and nobility.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /cgi-bin/encyclopedia.pl?p=Vasili_III   (496 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Russia
Russia, that of the Baltic, and the Province of
Russia, the number of men is greater than that of the women; in 3 the numbers are equal, and in 34 the number of women is in excess of that of the men; in 12 governments the proportion is 100 men to 110 women.
Russia, exclusive of the Kingdom of Poland, 1,067,019,596 acres of cultivated land, besides 17,609,124 acres in the Kalmuck steppes, and 19,133,296 in the steppes of the Kirghiz.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/13231c.htm   (14893 words)

  
 Tsar: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com
Tsar (Russian царь, from Latin Caesar, cognate with German Kaiser; also spelt Czar in English) was the title used for the rulers of Russia from 1546 to 1917.
It was adopted by Ivan IV as symbolic of a change in the nature of the Russian monarchy.
The Patriarchs, heads of the Russian Orthodox Church, acted as leaders of Russia at times, as during the Polish occupation and interregnum of 1610 - 1613.
www.encyclopedian.com /ts/Tsar.html   (552 words)

  
 Vasili III of Russia at AllExperts
Vasili III Ivanovich (Russian: Ð'асилий III Иванович, also Basil) (March 251479 – December 31533) was the Grand Prince of Moscow from 1505 to 1533.
Although in 1519 he was obliged to buy off the khan of the Crimea, Moxammad Giray, under the very walls of Moscow, towards the end of his reign he established Russian influence on the Volga.
Vasili's greatest problem was the lack of heir.
en.allexperts.com /e/v/va/vasili_iii_of_russia.htm   (517 words)

  
 Tsar - Wikipedia
Tsar (Russian царь, from Latin Caesar, cognate with German Kaiser; also spelt Czar in English) was the title used for the rulers of Russia from 1546 to 1917.
It was adopted by Ivan IV as symbolic of a change in the nature of the Russian monarchy.
The Patriarchs, heads of the Russian Orthodox Church, acted as leaders of Russia at times, as during the Polish occupation and interregnum of 1610 - 1613.
wikipedia.findthelinks.com /ts/Tsar.html   (515 words)

  
 Russia1425to1462.htm   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Vasily II Vasilievich Tyomny "The Blind" was Great Prince of Moscow during 1425-1462 CE.
He was the second son of Vasily I, prince of Moscow.
They were Yury Vasilievich the Elder 1437 - 1441; Ivan III Vasilievich 1440 - 1505; Yury Vasilievich the Younger 1441 -1472; Andrey Vasilievich Bolshoy ("The Elder") 1446 - 1483; Semyon Vasilievich 1447 - 1449; Boris Vasilievich 1449 -1494; Andrey Vasilievich Menshoy ("The Younger") 1452 - 1481; Anna Vasilievna 1451 - 1501.
www.worldcoincatalog.com /C5/Russia/1425to1462VasiliII/Russia1425to1462.htm   (100 words)

  
 Ivan III of Russia information - Search.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Ivan III Vasilevich (Иван III Васильевич) (January 22, 1440 – October 27, 1505), also known as Ivan the Great, was a grand duke of Muscovy who first adopted a more pretentious title of the "grand duke of all the Russias".
It was in the reign of Ivan III that Muscovy rejected the Tatar yoke.
It was in the reign of Ivan III that the new Russian Sudebnik, or law code, was compiled by the scribe Vladimir Gusev.
c10-ss-1-lb.cnet.com /reference/Ivan_III_of_Russia?redir=1   (1374 words)

  
 3m Littmann Cardiology Iii Stethoscope   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Clovis III - Clovis III was the king of Austrasia from 675 to 676.
Frederick III of Sicily - Frederick III (or II) (1272 – 1337), King of Sicily, was the third son of King Peter III of Aragon and Sicily, and of Constance, daughter of Manfred.
Vasili III of Russia - Vasili III Ivanovich (Russian: Василий III Иванович, also Basil) (March 251479 – December 31533) was the Grand Prince of Moscow from 1505 to 1533.
st93.maclab-usa.com /3mlittmanncardiologyiiistethoscope.html   (853 words)

  
 EARLY COINAGE OF MOSCOW
The ancient coins of Russia were struck on behalf of the princes of Kiev, the political and economic capital from the tenth to twelfth centuries.
The decline of Kiev was cemented by the Mongol invasion of the thirteenth century as the city was sacked in 1240.
In 1417 Vasili I's eldest son Ivan died and the Grand Princely title was to pass to the infant Vasili II.
www.chicagocoinclub.org /projects/PiN/ecm.html   (4149 words)

  
 Australian Information from Wikipedia
Currently in Russia, Cossacks are seen as either ethnic descendants or by their active military service and often both.
Due to the unsuccessful policy of Ivan Mazepa who allied himself with Charles XII of Sweden against Russia in Great Northern War the state came to decline and the Cossacks' autonomy was abolished.
Their settlement at the border with Russia was approved by the Ottoman Empire after the Cossacks officially vowed to serve the Sultan.
www.thinkingaustralia.com /thinking_australia/wikipedia/default.php?title=Cossack   (5209 words)

  
 Ivan III of Russia Summary
The marriage was sponsored by the Vatican in hope of bringing Russia under the sway of the Pope and of establishing a broad front against the Turks, a goal that failed.
It was in the reign of Ivan III that Muscovy rejected the Tatar yoke.
It was in the reign of Ivan III that the new Russian Sudebnik, or law code, was compiled by the scribe Vladimir Gusev.
www.bookrags.com /Ivan_III_of_Russia   (1870 words)

  
 Medieval Russia
The son of Vasili II, Ivan III, was a cautious man who "always took two bites at a cherry," preferred to let his troops go into battle without him (uncommon in the age of chivalry), and was afraid of the dark.
The next tsar, Vasili III (1505-33), was too colorless to be mentioned in most history books, but he completed the work of reunification that his father had started, annexing Pskov (1510) and Ryazan (1521), and taking Smolensk from Lithuania (1514).
Russia had technically been an empire since Ivan IV conquered the Moslems on the Volga, but to westerners the Russian Empire was still called Muscovy, a Medieval state more Oriental than Occidental.
xenohistorian.faithweb.com /russia/ru01.html   (11703 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Ivan III of Russia
Ivan III Vasilevich (January 22, 1440 - October 27, 1505) also known as Ivan the Great ruled from 1462 - 1505.
Ivan's greatest conquests were the annexation rival Tver[?] and the conquest of Novogorod[?] with its important fur trade and massive northern territorial holdings.
Ivan is even more famous, however, for finally freeing Russia from the Tatars.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/iv/Ivan_III_of_Russia?title=Khan_Akmad   (252 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Ivan III of Russia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Ivan III Vasilevich (January 22, 1440 - October 27, 1505) also known as Ivan the Great ruled from 1462 - 1505.
Ivan's greatest conquests were the annexation rival Tver[?] and the conquest of Novogorod[?] with its important fur trade and massive northern territorial holdings.
Ivan is even more famous, however, for finally freeing Russia from the Tatars.
encyclopedia.kids.net.au /page/iv/Ivan_III_of_Russia   (252 words)

  
 List of Russian Rulers Encyclopedia Article @ 209.68.55.253 ()   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
At different times, a ruler in Kievan Rus'/Muscovy/Imperial Russia bore the title of Kniaz (translated as Duke or Prince), Velikiy Kniaz (translated as Grand Duke, Grand Prince or Great Prince), Tsar, Emperor.
The Patriarchs, heads of the Russian Orthodox Church, also sometimes acted as the leaders of Russia — as, for example, during the Polish occupation and interregnum of 1610—1613 (see List of Metropolitans and Patriarchs of Moscow).
Sophia Alekseyevna (1682-1689) (was a regent of Russia in the time of joint ruler Peter I with Ivan V) Ivan V (1682 - 1696) (joint ruler with Peter I) Peter I (Peter the Great) (1682 - 1721) (joint ruler with Ivan V until 1696)
209.68.55.253 /encyclopedia/List_of_Russian_rulers   (816 words)

  
 Russian Arts - Russian Visa Service
The written word in early Russia was not treated to such decoration; it was regarded merely as a means of transmitting information and teaching.
Vasily Tre­diakovskyjoined him in establishing versifi­cation guidelines; and Alexander Sumarokov pitched in to systematise literary genres.
Peter's reforms at one and the same time opened Russia to the West and prompted fresh perspective on the native cultural idioms of Russia itself Entering the 19th century, artists were self-consciously aware - for the first time since early Christ­ian art and architecture - of those traits that defined Russian culture.
www.visaexpress.net /russia/arts.htm   (4423 words)

  
 A Brief History of Russia
In 1237 Khan Batu, the grandson of Genghis Khan invaded Russia.
The French ruler, Napoleon III was keen to fight a successful war as he believed it would increase his support in France and used the situation to engineer a war.
However Napoleon III persuaded the British to help him to try and capture the Russian fort of Sevastopol arguing that it was a threat to the security of the whole region.
www.localhistories.org /russia.html   (4789 words)

  
 Tsar : Tzar
Tsar (Russian царь, from Latin Caesar, cognate with German Kaiser; also spelt Czar in English) was the title used for the rulers of Russia from 1546 to 1917.
It was adopted by IV of Russia">Ivan IV as symbolic of a change in the nature of the Russian monarchy.
The Patriarchs, heads of the Russian Orthodox Church, acted as leaders of Russia at times, as during the Polish occupation and interregnum of 1610 - 1613.
www.findword.org /tz/tzar.html   (722 words)

  
 Vasili III of Russia information - Search.com
Vasili III Ivanovich, an engraving by a contemporary European artist.
Vasili III Ivanovich (Russian: Василий III Иванович, also Basil) (March 251479 – December 31533) was the Grand Prince of Moscow from 1505 to 1533.
Vasili also took advantage of the difficult position of Sigismund of Poland to capture Smolensk, the great eastern fortress of Lithuania (1512), chiefly through the aid of the rebel Lithuanian, Prince Mikhail Hlinski, who provided him with artillery and engineers.
www.search.com /reference/Vasili_III_of_Russia   (486 words)

  
 Russia Blog: The Stalin of the 16th Century
Ivan IV (the Russian word, grozny, is better translated as “fearsome” or “dangerous” rather than “terrible”) was born to Vasili III, the Grand Prince of Muscovy, at a time when Russia was just starting to emerge from its precarious position between European Christendom and the Islamic world.
Even combined, these "Russias" were less powerful than the vast Muslim Khanates of the Don and Volga regions to the south and the Catholic Kingdoms of Poland and Livonia (Lithuania) to the West.
Like most of Eurasia at that time, Russia was still recovering from being ravaged by the Mongol hordes and their fierce descendants the Tartars, who had converted to Islam.
www.russiablog.org /2006/12/the_stalin_of_the_16th_century.php   (1138 words)

  
 Excerpts from GURPS Russia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Vasili III, Ivan the Great's son, continued gathering the last of the resistant towns of the west (and fighting repeated skirmishes with Poland) and developing diplomatic ties with the leaders of distant lands, including the sultan of Turkey, Suleiman the Magnificent, and Babar (a descendant of Tamerlane), founder of the Mogul Empire in India.
Russia was in the hands of Ivan's mother, Helen, during his minority, and she ran it with the assistance of several men, including a young lover, Prince Telepnev-Obolensky.
The bickering of the noble class had torn Russia into fragments, and it was left to the common people and their love of Mother Russia to gather the pieces together.
www.sjgames.com /gurps/books/russia/excerpts.html   (7799 words)

  
 Prints Old & Rare - Russia page
The agreement forced Russia to cede large areas to the Central Powers and recognized the independence of Poland, the Baltic states, Georgia, and Ukraine.
It is titled, "Russia in Europe" and shows the different divisions within the Western part of Russia each in a different pastel color.
The full title of the map reads, " SOUTH-WEST RUSSIA Showing the extent of the Kingdom of Poland previous to its partition in 1772." The scale in the bottom left corner is done in: geographical and Italian miles, Russian versts, Polish miles, Austrian post miles, Austrain statute miles, Prussian miles and English statue miles.
www.printsoldandrare.com /russia   (5041 words)

  
 Moments in History #26 The Origins of Russia Part III
During the time that Russia was under the control of the Golden Horde, (1223 to 1480) the Byzantine Empire declined in power and influence.
Under Vasili II (1425-1462) a civil war between Vasili and his rivals for the throne of Muscovy was fought and won by Vasili.
Russia remained a disunited country until the reign of Ivan III (‘Ivan the Great’) of Muscovy (1462 to 1505) who ascended the throne on Vasili’s death in 1462.
www.users.bigpond.com /billmastermind/moments26.htm   (992 words)

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