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Topic: Vector spatial


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In the News (Wed 1 Oct 14)

  
  Vector article - Vector Latin mathematics element vector space field Vector (spatial) - What-Means.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Vector (spatial): In physics and engineering, vector most often refers specifically to an object that has a special relationship to the spatial coordinates/directions, i.e.
Vector (computing) is the method that malicious code (viruses, etc) uses to propagate itself.
In biology, a vector is a mechanism that transmits genes or organisms.
www.what-means.com /encyclopedia/Vector   (307 words)

  
 Vector (spatial) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A spatial vector is a special case of a tensor and is also analogous to a four-vector in relativity (and is sometimes therefore called a three-vector in reference to the three spatial dimensions, although this term also has another meaning for p-vectors of differential geometry).
Vectors can be contrasted with scalar quantities such as distance, speed, energy, time, temperature, charge, power, work, and mass, which have magnitude, but no direction (they are invariant under coordinate rotations).
The length or magnitude or norm of the vector a is denoted by
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Vector_(spatial)   (2834 words)

  
 Vector - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Vector (spatial): In physics and engineering, vector most often refers specifically to an object that has a special relationship to the spatial coordinates/directions, that is, an element of a tangent bundle.
A biological vector is a mechanism that transmits genes or organisms.
Vector is the capital of the Empire in the videogame Final Fantasy VI.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Vector   (427 words)

  
 Vector (spatial)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
For a generic manifold, velocity is a vector belonging to the tangent space of that manifold at whatever point, and position is a point which need not be a vector.
Vectors are defined in a coordinate-free way all the time, and n-tuples don't define vectors unless they form a linear space in some natural way, which isn't how we usually think of charts on spheres.
such that (i) the resulting vector is mutually orthoganol to the generating vectors, and (ii) the length of the resulting vector is equal to the hypervolume of the parallelpiped formed by those vectors.
www.infothis.com /discuss/Vector_(spatial)   (3468 words)

  
 Vector (spatial) Info - Encyclopedia WikiWhat.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Often informally described as an object with a "magnitude" (size) and "direction", a vector is more formally defined by its relationship to the spatial coordinate system under rotations.
Such a vector is a special case of a tensor and is also analogous to a four-vector in relativity (and is sometimes therefore called a three-vector in reference to the three spatial dimensions, although this term also has another meaning for p-vectors of differential geometry).
Informally, a vector is a quantity, characterized by a number (indicating size or "magnitude") and a direction, that is often represented graphically by an arrow.
www.wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/v/ve/vector__spatial_.html   (1943 words)

  
 SDTS: Spatial Data Transfer Standard - Part 1, Logical Specification
The vector modules are designed for the transfer of vector data as objects; that is, each module record defines a vector object including links to its component parts as well as a possible direct link to its attribute data.
The vector objects of 2.3 have been grouped into corresponding modules according to the similarity in data fields required to represent the object.
The vector-based spatial objects may include both the downward "is composed of" definition in the composite module and the upward "composes" definition in the Point-Node, Line, Arc, Ring, and Polygon modules.
mcmcweb.er.usgs.gov /sdts/SDTS_standard_nov97/part1b26.html   (1817 words)

  
 Vector (spatial)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Often informally described as an object with a "magnitude" and "direction", a vector is more formally defined by itsrelationship to the spatial coordinate system under rotations.Alternatively, it can be defined in a coordinate -free fashion via a tangent space of a three-dimensional manifold in the language of differentialgeometry.
Such a vector is a special case of a tensor and is also analogous to a four-vector in relativity (and is sometimes therefore called a three-vector in reference to the threespatial dimensions, although this term also has another meaning for p-vectors ofdifferential geometry).
Moregenerally, a vector is a tensor of contravariant rank one.
www.therfcc.org /vector-spatial--31861.html   (1772 words)

  
 Introduction to GIS - vector based GIS
Vector data is comprised of lines or arcs, defined by beginning and end points, which meet at nodes.
Vector storage involves the storage of explicit topology, which raises overheads, however it only stores those points which define a feature and all space outside these features is 'non-existent'.
In the vector based model (figure 4), geospatial data is represented in the form of co-ordinates.
www.sli.unimelb.edu.au /gisweb/GISModule/GIST_Vector.htm   (957 words)

  
 A Climate-Based Model Predicts the Spatial Distribution of the Lyme Disease Vector Ixodes scapularis in the United ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Because an accurate understanding of the spatial distribution of both the pathogen and the vector is integral to disease prevention strategies, spatially explicit models founded on basic ecologic principles are invaluable tools in epidemiology and public health.
Spatial autocorrelation in the probability of establishment derived from the initial regression was assessed, therefore, by Moran's I using Crimestat (Levine 2000).
Temporal and spatial dynamics of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) in a rural landscape.
ehp.niehs.nih.gov /members/2003/6052/6052.html   (4676 words)

  
 VECTOR
Given two points A and B, is the vector with its base at A and tip at B. Its magnitude is the distance between A and B and its direction is in the direction from A toward B. Equivalent vectors describe the same relationship between different sets of points.
spatial vectors that are used by a coordinate system (cs) to describe all other spatial vectors in that system using coordinates.
These coordinates may represent a displacement vector, position vector, translation vector etc.The coordinates must be used with an understanding of what they represent and in what reference frame.
personal.uncc.edu /jamiller/terms/VECTOR.htm   (453 words)

  
 [No title]
Vector point symbols created in TNTmips can now be converted to a relational table structure that is used to define a Billboard and Stalk (B&S) symbol layer in your simulation.
Overlay layers created from vectors with 3D coordinates (which can be any of the three overlay types) retain their vertical coordinates and, therefore, do not need to reference a particular terrain layer when shown in your geosim.
If the extent of a vector, CAD, or TIN object is reset when saved because you have made an edit alteration to reduce its extent (for example, you remove a stray outlying point element whose inclusion causes inflated extents in a view), the save action will also cause a redraw using these new extents.
www.microimages.com /relnotes/v68/rel68.doc   (8579 words)

  
 About differences between vector images and rasterized images
Its spatial resolution is determined by the resolution of the acquisition device and the quality of the original data source.
When increasing the spatial resolution by 2 times, the total size of a two-dimensional raster image will increase by 4 times because the number of pixels is doubled in both X and Y dimensions.
Besides the size issue, vector data is easier than raster data to handle on a computer because it has fewer data items and it is more flexible to be adjusted for different scale, for example, a projection system in mapping application.
www.forum4designers.com /message27895.html   (645 words)

  
 The GIS Primer - Fundamental Concepts
subsystem organizes the data, spatial and attribute, in a form which permits it to be quickly retrieved by the user for analysis, and permits rapid and accurate updates to be made to the database.
Vector data is characterized by the use of sequential points or vertices to define a linear segment.
Vector lines are often referred to as arcs and consist of a string of vertices terminated by a node.
www.innovativegis.com /basis/primer/concepts.html   (4920 words)

  
 Network analysis - raster versus vector
In both cases the flow of movement, either from node to node in a network, or from cell to neighbouring cell of a raster, is subject to resistance, determining the direction and speed of flow.
Using vector, it is easier to import the attribute data of a given network in from an external database, which is where the data often would be stored in real life.
The vector data model is feature oriented, as it represents space as a series of discrete entities, which are geographically referenced by Cartesian coordinates.
www.husdal.com /mscgis/network.htm   (2234 words)

  
 Spatial Data Organization
Spatial Data Organization describes the mechanism used to represent spatial information in the data set.
Indirect spatial reference methods usually use a geographic feature, such as a county, state, township or section of the Public Land Survey System, or a road, to uniquely identify a place.
Indirect spatial references are [important] because they are a very common means by which observations of other attribute information are tied to a place.
www.ciesin.org /metadata/documentation/guidelines/spatdat.html   (567 words)

  
 [No title]
An important element of the scheme is the choice of a shift vector that allows the fl hole orbital dynamics to be followed while the spatial coordinates remain regular and that provides a good discretization of the exterior region.
The first part is a vector field that is outward pointing on each horizon with magnitude close to the coordinate speed of light and falling off towards zero at large distances.
Superposed on this is a vector field with sinusoidal angular dependence (locally uniform vector field) at the horizon, which also decreases with distance.
godel.ph.utexas.edu /Members/richard/gc/innerB.html   (1069 words)

  
 CIESIN's Guide to FGDC Compliant Metadata
Spatial Data Organization Information is the mechanism used to represent spatial information in the data set.
Definition: Point and vector object information (Note that this reference to the SDTS is used ONLY to provide a set of terminology for the point and vector objects).
Definition: Point and vector object information (Note that this reference to the VPF is used ONLY to provide a set of terminology for the point and vector objects).
sedac.ciesin.org /metadata/guide/spatdat.html   (666 words)

  
 [No title]
Digital spatial data sets produced by the USGS include information stored in both vector and raster data structures.
The Topological Vector Profile of the SDTS has been approved and available since February 1994 for use in exchange of vector-based spatial data and their attributes.
This will ensure that formats of spatial data products from the USGS are more consistent and users of major GIS systems will be able to import most USGS data with a minimum of translator software.
www.usgs.gov /usgs-manual/500/504-1.html   (759 words)

  
 Parallel GIS Algorithms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The basic structure of a vector format is therefore the polygon, to which attributes are logically attached.
This uses vector data in which two map sheets (or data layers) with different classifications, representing the same (or overlapping) areas, are combined to produce a hybrid map.
The operations use a spatial decomposition of a map sheet into rectangular blocks or strips, the exact decomposition being determined at run-time according to the spatial distribution of the data.
www.geo.ed.ac.uk:81 /home/research/gispal/pap1.html   (467 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
When it comes to give good support to overlay and spatial queries you also have to think at a fast way perform them: spatial indexes are the solutions, and there are some already made libraries that can build R-trees...
In particular, this is a non-topological approach, and it seems that the GRASS community does not wish to alter the approach to vectors this dramatically.
Should be spatial operations part of vector lib (Vect_*()) or shall we open new vector spatial lib (VS_*()) - maybe GPL only (not LGPL).
grass.itc.it /grass57/grass51_vector_discussion.txt   (4486 words)

  
 Go Spatial Limited GIS Data Products   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
vector data products are based on the NIMA VMAP Level 0 vector base map.
This is a rare map and Go Spatial Limited has made this map available in Vector format for the first time.
Overlay the Vector Base Map on this image to impart to your viewers a sense of topographic relief.
www.gospatial.com /html/gis_data.html   (652 words)

  
 CSDGM - 3 : Spatial Data Organization Information
Spatial Data Organization Information -- the mechanism used to represent spatial information in the data set.
3.3.1.1 SDTS Point and Vector Object Type -- name of point and vector spatial objects used to locate zero-, one-, and two-dimensional spatial locations in the data set.
3.3.2.2.1 VPF Point and Vector Object Type -- name of point and vector spatial objects used to locate zero-, one-, and two-dimensional spatial locations in the data set.
www.fgdc.gov /metadata/csdgm/03.html   (625 words)

  
 physics - Vector (spatial)
In physics and engineering, the word vector typically refers to a quantity that has close relationship to the spatial coordinates, informally described as an object with a "magnitude" and a "direction".
To normalize a vector, scale the vector by the inverse of its length.
Technically, the scalar triple product isn't a scalar, it is a pseudoscalar: under a coordinate inversion (x goes to −x), it flips sign.
www.physicsdaily.com /physics/Vector_(spatial)   (1915 words)

  
 Pipelines   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
This layer is a set of vector lines delineating pipeline features (natural gas, oil, water, etc.).
Go Spatial Limited GIS data products provided by Go Spatial Limited shall remain the property of Go Spatial Limited which shall retain all rights commensurate with ownership, including the right to sell, release, license, use or provide the data to others as it deems appropriate in its sole discretion.
The Licensed or unauthorized use of Go Spatial Limited GIS data products will be subject to the full penalties under the law including fines and imprisonment.
www.gospatial.com /metadata/pipe.htm   (297 words)

  
 The Computation of Lyapunov Exponents via Spatial Integration Using Vector Norms - Aston, Dellnitz (ResearchIndex)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
In contrast to the existing techniques this method is based on the spatial integration of the logarithm of the norm of certain vector elds de ned over the invariant set.
R ` ; `  2: Suppose that this system has a chaotic attractor with an ergodic invariant measure  and a corresponding (simple) largest Lyapunov exponent  1.
Aston, P.J. and Dellnitz, M., The computation of Lyapunov exponents via spatial integration: vector norms.
citeseer.ist.psu.edu /425666.html   (518 words)

  
 Vector (spatial) at opensource encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
One can check geometrically that a + b
(a_1-b_1)\mathbf{i} +(a_2-b_2)\mathbf{j} +(a_3-b_3)\mathbf{k} Subtraction of two vectors can be geometrically defined as follows: to subtract b from a, place the ends of a and b at the same point, and then draw an arrow from the tip of b to the tip of a.
"Vector (spatial)" in world wide web people finder »
wiki.tatet.com /Vector_(spatial).html   (1933 words)

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