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Topic: Vesta (mythology)


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  Vesta (mythology) - MSN Encarta
Vesta (mythology), in Roman mythology, the goddess of the hearth, worshipped in a domestic context as a household deity.
The most important public shrine to Vesta was her round temple in the Forum at Rome, where her fire was said to have been brought from Troy by Aeneas, the legendary founder of Rome.
The shrine was symbolic of the safety of the city and was attended continually by six vestal virgins, priestesses who kept the fire burning and who served for terms of 30 years according to severe rules.
uk.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761561700/Vesta_(mythology).html   (115 words)

  
  Vesta (mythology) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Vesta was the virgin goddess of the hearth, home, and family in Roman mythology, analogous to Hestia in Greek mythology.
Vesta was celebrated at the Vestalia, June 7 to June 15.
Vesta particularly important to women of household as hearth was where food was prepared and next to it the meal eaten with offerings being thrown in to it seeking omens (the future) form the way it burned.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Vesta_(mythology)   (664 words)

  
 Vesta (mythology)
Vesta was the virgin goddess of home and hearth in Roman mythology, analogous to Hestia in Greek mythology.
Vesta was celebrated at the Vestalia[?], June 7 to 15.
On the first day, the penus Vestae, (the sancta sanctorum[?] of her temple) was opened, for the only time during the year, for women to make sacrifices in.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ve/Vestales.html   (367 words)

  
 Vesta (mythology) Summary
The importance of Vesta is evident in the liturgy.
In the house Vesta was particularly important as the goddess of the hearth and of fire.
Vesta was particularly important to women of the household as the hearth was the place where food was prepared and next to it the meal with eaten with offerings being thrown into the fire to seek omens (the future) from the way it burned.
www.bookrags.com /Vesta_(mythology)   (2277 words)

  
 Roman mythology - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Thus the archaic Roman "mythology", at least concerning the gods, was made up not of narratives, but rather of interlocking and complex interrelations between and among gods and humans.
The original religion of the early Romans was modified by the addition of numerous and conflicting beliefs in later times, and by the assimilation of a vast amount of Greek mythology.
Thus, Janus and Vesta guarded the door and hearth, the Lares protected the field and house, Pales the pasture, Saturn the sowing, Ceres the growth of the grain, Pomona the fruit, and Consus and Ops the harvest.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Roman_mythology   (1414 words)

  
 NationMaster.com - Encyclopedia: Roman mythology
Persephone, the Maiden: the late Archaic Kore of Antenor from the Acropolis, Athens In Greek mythology, Persephone (Greek Περσεφόνη, Classical Greek Persephónē, Modern Greek Persefóni) was the queen of the Underworld, the Kore or young maiden, and the daughter of Demeter.
Vulcan, in Roman mythology, is the son of Jupiter and Juno, and husband of Maia and Venus.
In Greek mythology, Ismene was the youngest child of Oedipus and Jocasta, and the sister of Antigone, Eteocles and Polynices.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Roman-mythology   (4201 words)

  
 Vesta
Vesta is the goddess of the hearth, equated with the Greek Hestia.
Vesta's temple was situated on the Forum Romanum and was built in the third century BCE.
Vesta is portrayed as a stern woman, wearing a long dress and with her head covered.
www.pantheon.org /articles/v/vesta.html   (249 words)

  
 Vesta- Goddess of the Hearth   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
In Greek mythology, Hestia was the daughter of Cronos and Rhea, the sister of Zeus, Hades, Poseidon, Hera, and Demeter.
Vesta symbolizes the hearth, the flame, the altar and its sacred flame, and the the preservation of whatever is considered to be sacred.
In ancient times Vesta was worshipped both in the city center as the flaming altar, and in every home as the central hearth whose embers were literally passed on down through the generations from mother to daughter when the daughter married and established her own hearth.
www.astrological-insights.com /Vesta.html   (4833 words)

  
 Welcome to the Planets Version
Centaur -- In Greek mythology, a being with the head, arms, and torso of a man, and the body and legs of a horse.
Titan -- In Greek mythology, Titans were the firstborn children of Uranus (the sky) and Gaea (the Earth).
In Greek mythology, god of the sky, mate of the goddess of the Earth, and father of the Titans.
pds.jpl.nasa.gov /planets/special/glossary.htm   (2887 words)

  
 Roman Mythology
ROMAN MYTHOLOGY, various beliefs, rituals, and other observances concerning the supernatural held or practiced by the ancient Romans from the legendary period until Christianity finally completely supplanted the native religions of the Roman Empire at the start of the Middle Ages.
Thus, Janus and Vesta guarded the door and hearth, the Lares protected the field and house, Pales the pasture, Saturn the sowing, Ceres the growth of the grain, Pomon a the fruit, and Consus and Ops the harvest.
Vesta, however, was worshipped both as the guardian of the domestic hearth and also as the personification of the ceremonial flame.
www.geocities.com /Athens/Delphi/8991/roman.html   (4901 words)

  
 Vesta@astrologicallyspeaking.com
The astrological symbol for Vesta looks like a stylized flame in a hearth, perhaps reminding us of the eternal flame in Rome, which was kept burning permanently as a symbol of the belief that Rome was eternal.
In the Who's Who in Classical Mythology [iv] - the statement reads that she was the goddess of home and hearth and could have had Apollo or Poseidon as her husband but refused marriage and further that she has no mythology.
My Vesta is in the 9th house in Virgo, and I always find myself sharing philosophical concepts that have the potential to allow others to broaden their horizons armed with a different perspective.
www.astrologicallyspeaking.com /vesta.htm   (1628 words)

  
 Vesta: Mythology - astrology.com
She was the Keeper of the Hearth and tended the sacred fire on Mt. Olympus.
Hestia, her Greek name, literally translates to mean "fire." She is revered as fire is: warming, soothing, enlightening, and essential to the soul, but less crucial to the needs of the flesh.
Vesta was the Goddess of the Vestal Virgins, a group of women trusted for their truth-telling who wielded immense power in society.
goddess.astrology.com /vesta/mythology.html   (149 words)

  
 Solar Fire Astrology Software - Asteroid Goddesses   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Thus Vesta, insofar as she is sexual, represents a rarefied form of sex that transcends the procreative function and aims to achieve spiritual union rather than physical children.
To the ancient Greeks, Vesta was known as Hestia, a name derived from the word for hearth, and it appears that she had to do with the domestication of fire for human use in the home and in sacrificial offerings.
With Vesta in Taurus conjunct the Sun in Gemini in the Second House, she was a self-identified woman who defied sexual taboos and communicated inner meaning through her celebration of the body and her dedication to the dance.
www.astrologysoftwareshop.com /charting/sf/rpt/RptAstGoddess.htm   (16711 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Roman Mythology ROMAN MYTHOLOGY, various beliefs, rituals, and other observances concerning the supernatural held or practiced by the ancient Romans from the legendary period until Christianity finally completely supplanted the native religions of the Roman Empire at the start of the Middle Ages.
Amulius Amulius, in Roman mythology was a descendant of the Trojan hero Aeneas.
Vesta Vesta was the Roman equivalent of the Greek goddess Hesta, who was the goddess of the hearth.
www.homepagez.com /latinproject/info.html   (10851 words)

  
 Asteroids
In Roman mythology, Ceres was known as the goddess of agriculture, the harvest, and abundance of the land.
Vesta is the brightest of the asteroids and at time can even be seen with the naked eye.
In Roman mythology, Vesta was the goddess of the hearth and its fire.
www.astrology3d.com /educenter/asteroids.html   (1059 words)

  
 The Lunar Planner
Vesta is the asteroid of focus, dedication and commitment; of physical, emotional, and mental clarity; and of self-respect.
Vesta was discovered on 29 March 1807 by the German physician Heinrich Wilhelm Matthaus Olbers (1758-1840), He named the asteroid for the Roman goddess of virtue at the suggestion of Carl Friedrich Gauss.
n mythical language, Vesta, revered goddess of the Vestal Virgins, is daughter of Rhea and Saturn, the eldest sister of Jupiter, and is keeper of the sacred fire on Mt. Olympus--meaning keeper of the eternal flame (truth) of the soul.
www.lunarplanner.com /asteroids.html   (6361 words)

  
 ASTEROIDS
VESTA is the Goddess of the hearth and represents the ability to ‘keep the home fires burning.’ In ancient Greece she had a temple of worship, as did all of the major Gods and Goddesses.
The temple of VESTA was attended by Vestal Virgins who essentially provided the light at the end of the tunnel for soldiers away at battle or on long journeys.
She represents the ability to hold onto a dream, focus ones attention on a long-term goal and to ‘carry a torch.’ The Olympic torchbearer is a modern vestige of her domain, as is the sentiment represented by the Statue of Liberty.
www.cville.com /members/AURASTROLOGY/ASTEROIDS.htm   (1069 words)

  
 Asteroid Goddesses
Pluto is Semisquare Vesta The orb is 0
Vesta is Trine Ascendant The orb is 2
Vesta, the last-discovered of the four, represents the final stage of life when a woman's focus commonly turns away from child-bearing and child-rearing, and she turns toward cultivating herself as a separate individual, apart from her family relationships.
www.astrolightsoftware.com /Samples/astgod.htm   (19737 words)

  
 Vesta Case   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Most vesta cases were made of inexpensive materials but some were made in precious metals or enamelled.
4 Vesta (''ves'-ta'') is the third-largest asteroid in the Main belt, between 530 and 468 km in diameter.
Vesta was discovered by the German astronomer Heinrich Wilhelm Olbers on March 29, 1807.
www.wwwtln.com /finance/191/vesta-case.html   (1297 words)

  
 Vesta articles on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Vesta VESTA [Vesta], in astronomy, fourth asteroid to be discovered.
He was pontifex maximus (from 243) and was said to have been blinded (241) in rescuing the Palladium from the burning temple of Vesta.
Hestia HESTIA [Hestia], in Greek religion and mythology, goddess of the hearth; daughter of Kronos and Rhea.
www.encyclopedia.com /articles/13440.html   (460 words)

  
 Roman Mythology   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Roman Mythology is a broad topic concerning the various beliefs and rituals about the supernatural beings.
Ovid called her the "goddess of a thousand works." Her Greek mythology counterpart was Athena, and Minerva too sprung fully grown, and fully armored, from the head of Jupiter.
Households kept a fire burning on the hearth for Vesta (Above the hearth stood a statue of Lares, guard of the fields, and Penates protector of the house).
www.homepagez.com /latinproject/mythology/oldindex.html   (4427 words)

  
 Vesta (mythology) - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Vesta (mythology) - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Vesta (astronomy), asteroid orbiting the Sun between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter at a mean distance of 2.36 astronomical units (353 million...
Vesta was one of the most revered and trusted of all Goddesses.
uk.encarta.msn.com /Vesta_(mythology).html   (195 words)

  
 Vesta - TheBestLinks.com - Asteroid, Roman mythology, Hestia, 4 Vesta, ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Vesta - TheBestLinks.com - Asteroid, Roman mythology, Hestia, 4 Vesta,...
Vesta, Asteroid, Roman mythology, Hestia, 4 Vesta, Vesta (mythology), Disambig...
The goddess Vesta in Roman mythology equivalent to Greek Hestia
www.thebestlinks.com /Vesta.html   (119 words)

  
 Vesta (Olympian Goddess)
Vesta once was a member of the ruling council of Olympian gods which was comprised of Zeus, Hera, Neptune, Demeter, and Vesta, together with Zeus's children Apollo, Ares, Artemis, Athena, Hephaestus, Hermes, and Venus.
Her worship under the name of Vesta (as she was named Hestia at birth and was so worshipped in Greece) carried over to the ancient Romans after the survivors of the fallen city of Troy travelled to the lands of Italy.
Vesta was not mentioned by name in Thor I#301, but the Official Handbook of the Marvel Universe #8 identified her as being one of the Olympians seen.
www.marvunapp.com /Appendix/vestahes.htm   (725 words)

  
 Vesta   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Vesta was the goddess of the hearth; her etymology equivalent was the Greek goddess Hestia.
Each goddess had similar cults, though Vesta seemed to have been more honored with the Roman pantheon than her counterpart within the Greek one.
Vesta's shrine stood near the Regia, or Palace of King.
www.themystica.com /mythical-folk/articles/vesta.html   (373 words)

  
 A complete guide to Italy and the italian culture :: Tricolore.Net - Bringing Italians Together
VESTA [ves'ta], the counterpart to the Greek Hestia, was the goddess of the hearth, the center of family life and of the state's life as a community.
The Trojan Palladium was kept in the temple of Vesta; it was said to have been given by Diomedes to the embassy of Aeneas that had sought his help.
Roman poets inherited the mythology of the Underworld from Homer and other Greek poets and from the philosophers (most notably Plato); they also used the beliefs of the mystery religions, both Greek and oriental.
www.tricolore.net /cgi-bin/display_article.html?s=27&a=87   (2650 words)

  
 Vesta (mythology): Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Vesta was introduced in Rome (Capital and largest city of Italy; on the Tiber; seat of the Roman Catholic Church; formerly the capital of the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire)
Vestal Virgin ((Roman mythology) one of the virgin priestesses consecrated to the Roman goddess Vesta and to maintaining the sacred fire in her temple)
Amulius (In roman mythology, amulius was the brother of numitor and son of procas....)
www.absoluteastronomy.com /ref/vesta_mythology   (2169 words)

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