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Topic: Virgin birth


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In the News (Sun 27 May 18)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-20)
The Virgin Birth is a key doctrine of the Christian faith, and is also held to be true by most Muslims.
The doctrine asserts that Jesus Christ was conceived in the womb of his mother, the Virgin Mary, without the participation of a human father.
Another reason that Christians consider the virgin birth to be significant is that it shows Jesus' divine and human natures at once united, paving the way for all of humanity to be united with God.
wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/v/vi/virgin_birth.html   (260 words)

  
 Paddy Cakes: The Virgin Birth of Jesus
For this "prophecy" of the virgin birth of the Child Jesus, the marginal reference is to the Old Testament, Isaiah vii, 14, as the inspired "source" of the assertion made by Matthew.
The Hebrew word for a woman actually a virgin is bethulah; and throughout the Hebrew Bible the two words almah and bethulah are used with a fair degree of discrimination of sense, as shown by the instances which I think it pertinent to cite, for a clear understanding of this important point.
As this of the "prophecy" of the alleged "virgin birth of Jesus Christ" is the keystone of the whole scheme of Christianity, it is of the highest importance to clearly understand, from the context, what Isaiah is recorded as so oracularly delivering himself about.
www.harrington-sites.com /virgin.html   (1964 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Virgin Birth of Christ
The mystery of the virginal conception is furthermore taught by the third Gospel and confirmed by the first.
Harnack [39] is of the opinion that the virgin birth originated from Isaias 7:14; Lobstein [40] adds the "poetic traditions surrounding the cradle of Isaac, Samson, and Samuel" as another source of the belief in the virgin birth.
Those who derive the virgin birth from Isaias 7:14, must maintain that an accidental misinterpretation of the Prophet by the Evangelist replaced historic truth among the early Christians in spite of the better knowledge and the testimony of the disciples and kindred of Jesus.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/15448a.htm   (3246 words)

  
 Virgin Birth Revisited
The woman may indeed be a virgin at the moment the prophecy is uttered.
Obviously Isaiah was aware of the significance of betulah and chose not to employ the word because it was not meant for Ahaz, and this is exactly were the misconception of the critics reside.
Christians want to support the testimony of the Gospel writers by using Isaiah 7:14 as an evidence of the virginity of Mary - that somehow the OT demonstrates that the Christ was foretold to be born of a virgin.
www.frontline-apologetics.com /virgin_birth_revisited.htm   (5106 words)

  
 Virgin birth: a defense
The virgin birth was not seen in a christological perspective when Matthew and Luke reported it; hence, there is no reason for it to appear in Paul's letters or elsewhere in the NT.
The virgin birth tradition is obviously early - Matthew and Luke, because of the differences in the way they report it, are evidently drawing on a pre-gospel tradition.
The Virgin Birth in the Theology of the Ancient Church.
www.tektonics.org /uz/virginbirth.html   (3812 words)

  
 Isn't the virgin birth of Jesus Christ mythological and scientifically impossible? - ChristianAnswers.Net
Isn't the virgin birth of Jesus Christ mythological and scientifically impossible?
Larry King, the CNN talk show host, was once asked who he would most want to interview if he could choose anyone from all of history.
Some critics cite the fact that the Apostle Paul is silent on the subject of the Virgin Birth, and the fact that Mary's virginity is never mentioned in the Gospel According to John, as evidence that Jesus was never born of a virgin.
www.christiananswers.net /q-aiia/virginbirth.html   (520 words)

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