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Topic: Virginia Woolf


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  Gale - Free Resources - Women's History - Biographies - Virginia Woolf
While Woolf received no formal education, she was raised in a cultured and literary atmosphere, learning from her father's extensive library and from conversing with his friends, many of whom were prominent writers of the era.
Woolf maintained that the purpose of writing an essay was to give pleasure to the reader, and she endeavored to do this with witty, supple prose, apt literary and cultural references, and a wide range of subjects.
While the majority of Woolf's essays are devoted to literary matters, some of her most highly regarded nonfiction writings are topical and occasional essays treating such subjects as war and peace, feminism, life and death, sex and class issues, her own travels, and observations of the contemporary scene.
www.gale.cengage.com /free_resources/whm/bio/woolf_v.htm   (1131 words)

  
  Virginia Woolf - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Virginia Woolf (née Stephen) (25 January 1882 28 March 1941) was a British author who is considered to be one of the foremost modernist/feminist literary figures of the twentieth century.
Virginia Woolf's peculiarities as a fiction writer have tended to obscure her central strength: Woolf is arguably the major lyrical novelist in the English language.
The intensity of Virginia Woolf's poetic vision elevates the ordinary, sometimes banal settings of most of her novels (with the exception of Orlando and Between the Acts), even as they are often set in an environment of war.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Virginia_Woolf   (2306 words)

  
 Understanding Virginia Woolf's Social Thought
Woolf's work suggests that more is necessary than the mere appreciation of work done, and we thus find that she concerns herself with issues similar to those occupying the minds of feminist economists today.
Woolf explains that she was requested to deliver a lecture on "women and fiction." The two papers resulting from the request were combined, and the institutions renamed "Oxbridge," a transparent contraction of the names Oxford and Cambridge.
Woolf recognized these tasks, and a thorough investigation of the extent to which she contributed to a feminist theory of value is facilitated by a careful reading of the diaries.
www.bridgew.edu /SoAS/jiws/may00/bechtold.htm   (5300 words)

  
 Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf's books were published by Hogarth Press, which she founded with her husband, the critic and writer Leonard Woolf.
Virginia Woolf was born in London, as the daughter of Julia Jackson Duckworth, a member of the Duckworth publishing family, and Sir Leslie Stephen, a literary critic, a friend of Meredith, Henry James, Tennyson, Matthew Arnold, and George Eliot, and the founder of the Dictionary of National Biography.
Leonard Woolf was born in London as the son of a barrister.
www.kirjasto.sci.fi /vwoolf.htm   (2149 words)

  
 GradeSaver: ClassicNote: Biography of Virginia Woolf
Virginia's feelings were likely affected by her relationship to her stepbrother, George Duckworth, who was fourteen when Virginia was born.
Woolf was the stable presence Virginia needed to control her moods and steady her talent.
Virginia was fond of children, however, and spent much time with her brother's and sister's children.) Through the press, she had an early look at Joyce's Ulysses and aided authors such as Forster, Freud, Isherwood, Mansfield, Tolstoy, and Chekov.
www.gradesaver.com /classicnotes/authors/about_virginia_woolf.html   (975 words)

  
 Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf, the daughter of Leslie Stephen and Julia Princep, was born in 1882.
Woolf rejected the traditional framework of narrative, description and rational exposition in prose and made considerable use of the stream of consciousness technique (recording the flow of thoughts and feelings as they pass through the character's mind).
Virginia Woolf is dead, a grey, highly-strung woman of dignity and charm; but she was unstable and often had periods of madness.
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk /Jwoolf.htm   (1942 words)

  
 A Modern Woman - Hermione Lee discovers Virginia Woolf's radicalism. By Sarah Kerr
Woolf was born Virginia Stephen in 1882, the freakishly talented, spectacularly cheekboned youngest daughter of Leslie Stephen, a successful but depressive London intellectual, and Julia Duckworth, a stoic beauty who brought to the marriage children of her own.
Virginia's early years were drenched in book chat, but otherwise not so different from other crowded, stifling Victorian youths: The children had a swarm of spinster aunts, curious animal-inspired nicknames like "Ape" and "Marmot," and not a moment of privacy.
Woolf stood up for her peers, but she also understood if people found her overweeningly concerned with style, or found Eliot obscure, or Joyce obscene, "a pimply undergraduate." She knew that modernism was a work in progress, not a new system to be defended to the death.
www.slate.com /id/2989   (1464 words)

  
 Brooklyn Museum: Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art: The Dinner Party: Place Setting: Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf is a renowned British novelist associated with the modernist movement in literature; her writing is characterized by experiments in language, narrative, and the treatment of time.
Woolf is often considered one of the most innovative writers of the 20th century, best known for fractured narratives and writing in a stream-of-consciousness prose style, in which characters are depicted through their interior monologue; her books were sometimes called psychological novels.
Woolf had worked on The Voyage Out since 1908 and had completed it in 1913, but as the result of another emotional breakdown in the early years of her marriage, publication of the novel was delayed until 1915.
www.brooklynmuseum.org /eascfa/dinner_party/place_settings/virginia_woolf.php   (1168 words)

  
 Is The Hours Afraid of Virginia Woolf? By Meghan O'Rourke
Virginia Woolf was deeply ambitious: "[O]ne of my vile vices is jealousy, of other writers' fame," she wrote in her diary.
Then there's Woolf herself: Because the movie begins with her suicide, then cuts to an earlier period, the Woolf sequences are inflected with a sense of her impending doom—with the inevitable gravity of that stone in her pocket.
With the exception of a strong scene between Woolf and her husband, Leonard, arguing on a train platform, the film fails to show the wit, social engagement, or satiric acuity for which Woolf was known.
www.slate.com /id/2076387   (1318 words)

  
 Caroline Stephen and her niece, Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf and her siblings from a young age had accepted their father's view of their aunt, who was called "Silly Milly" or "Nun" or "The Quaker" and was often a figure of fun in their early lives.
Virginia Woolf never had a desire to be a nun, although she did refer to herself as retreating to a nunnery when she wrote.
Woolf echoes the tradi tional monastic vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience when she recommends to women that "in the practice of your profession you refuse to be separated from poverty, chastity, derision and freedom from unreal loyalties".
www.quaker.org /fqa/types/t21-woolf.html   (2410 words)

  
 To The Lighthouse And Beyond - A Virginia Woolf And Bloomsbury Trail - 24 Hour Museum - official guide to UK museums, ...
Woolf was deeply affected by these deaths and they provided a model for the many sudden deaths in her fiction.
Virginia Woolf later wrote a biography (published by Hogarth Press) of her friend Roger Fry whilst the Courtauld Institute Gallery houses the Roger Fry Bequest as well as many Impressionist and post Impressionist masterpieces that influenced the artists of the Omega Workshops.
Virginia Woolf was cremated and her ashes scattered and buried in the grounds of Monks House, where there is now a commemorative statue.
www.24hourmuseum.org.uk /trlout_gfx_en/TRA15139.html   (2680 words)

  
 Alibris: Virginia Woolf   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Woolf's witty, beautifully written, and deeply revealing correspondence is among the most interesting we have, shedding light not only on Woolf herself but on the Bloomsbury milieu, the publishing world in England, and the society in which she lived and wrote.
Virginia Woolf's short stories are without exception experimental and ground-breaking--exemplary modernist texts that provide an enlightening introduction to her longer fiction and to her narrative style.
Virginia Woolf had an ambivalent attitude toward parties: she was drawn to social events but they often exhausted her and led to fits of depression.
www.alibris.com /search/books/author/Woolf,Virginia   (1162 words)

  
 Virginia Woolf - her life and works
Virginia was educated by private tutors and by extensive reading of literary classics in her father's library.
Virginia Woolf is a readable and well illustrated biography by John Lehmann, who at one point worked as her assistant at the Hogarth Press.
Virginia Woolf, a biography by Hermione Lee is strongly recommended if you would prefer something which assumes you know the general background to her life and the Bloomsbury group.
www.mantex.co.uk /ou/a319/woolf-01.htm   (868 words)

  
 Virginia Woolf - Free Online Library
Virginia Woolf was born in London as the daughter of Julia Jackson Duckworth, a member of the Duckworth publishing family, and Leslie Stephen, a literary critic and friend of Meredith, Henry James, Tennyson, Matthew Arnold, and George Eliot, and the founder of the Dictionary of National Biography.
Woolf argued that a change in the forms of literature was necessary, because most literature had been "made by men out of their own needs for their own uses." In the last chapter it explores the possibility of an androgynous mind.
Characteristic for Woolf's essays are dialogic nature of style and continual questioning of opinion - her reader is often directly addressed, in a conversational tone, and her rejection of an authoritative voice links her essays to the tradition of Montaigne.
woolf.thefreelibrary.com   (1621 words)

  
 Virginia Woolf Collection at Bartleby.com
A successful innovator in the form of the novel, she is considered a significant force in 20th-century fiction.
In 1912 she married Leonard Woolf, a critic and writer on economics, with whom she set up the Hogarth Press in 1917.
As a novelist Woolf’s primary concern was to represent the flow of ordinary experience.
www.bartleby.com /people/Woolf-Vi.html   (163 words)

  
 Virginia Woolf - Books and Biography
Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) was born in London, as the daughter of Julia Jackson Duckworth, a member of the Duckworth publishing family, and Sir Leslie Stephen, a literary critic, a friend of Meredith, Henry James, Tennyson, Matthew Arnold, and George Eliot, and the founder of the Dictionary of National Biography.
Woolf, who was educated at home by her father, grew up at the family home at Hyde Park Gate.
Woolf refers to Coleridge who said that a great mind is androgynous and states that when this fusion takes place the mind is fully fertilized and uses all its faculties.
www.readprint.com /author-91/Virginia-Woolf   (1685 words)

  
 Virginia Woolf
Virginia Woolf was constitutionally depressed, lost her mother at 13, had lived with a depressive, histrionic father (Leslie Stephen) for about 10 years thereafter, and had had suicidal episodes in her earlier life.
Woolf's husband, Leonard, was Jewish, and both Virginia and Leonard were outspoken socialists and intellectuals, and they had decided that if the Germans invaded their town they would kill themselves rather than be taken prisoner and sent to concentration camps.
Virginia Woolf and the Fictions of Psychoanalysis by Elizabeth Abel, Catharine R.
talentdevelop.com /Woolf.html   (2052 words)

  
 Virginia Woolf
When Virginia Woolf is working out in the 1910s and 1920s what kind of novelist she wants to be and what she thinks modern fiction ought to be doing, she always talks about how to get at the essence of personality.
Virginia Woolf and her contemporaries are poised on the edge of the revolution which has turned biography into the iconoclastic, gossipy artform it is now, when the only taboo is censorship.
Virginia Woolf has a passion for "lives of the obscure," and for marginal, unvalued literary forms like memoirs, letters, and journals.54 These lives are, mostly, women's.
partners.nytimes.com /books/first/l/lee-woolf.html   (6533 words)

  
 Virginia Woolf's Orlando: The Book as Critic
Virginia Woolf has created a character liberated from the restraints of time and sex.
The 1946 Penguin doesn't include any of Woolf's photographs; the 1960 includes them, but reduced in size and all clustered together in the center of the novel; not until 1973 are the photographs restored to their 1928 locations (at least for American readers).
Woolf herself tries to direct our reading of the text with visual cues -- the photographs -- in much the same way the publishers do with their various covers.
www.tetterton.net /orlando/orlando95_talk.html   (1314 words)

  
 Virginia Woolf
Woolf was educated at home by her father, Sir Leslie Stephen, and after his death she moved to London where she would become the center of the Bloomsbury group.
Woolf, herself, believed that she was going “mad.” She had her first breakdown at the age of thirteen, and others when she was twenty-two, twenty-eight, and thirty.
Virginia Woolf is known as for her creativity in writing, however she created little or nothing while unwell.
www.depts.drew.edu /wmst/corecourses/wmst111/timeline_bios/VaWoolf.htm   (1946 words)

  
 Heroine Worship: Virginia Woolf, The Voyage In
Woolf would know which end of the cradle to stir." Yet no one was more aware of the price of unworldliness than Virginia Woolf.
The diaries and letters spanning both world wars are filled with bulletins and arguments, terrors of distant armies and next-door bombs and the precariousness of the entire civilization of which she knew herself to be a late, probably too exquisite bloom.
But Woolf's personal example is in the strength and the steady professionalism that kept her constantly at work - the overambitious failures as sweated over as the lyric triumphs.
www2.nytimes.com /specials/magazine4/articles/woolf.html   (588 words)

  
 Heroine Worship: Virginia Woolf, The Voyage In
Woolf would know which end of the cradle to stir." Yet no one was more aware of the price of unworldliness than Virginia Woolf.
The diaries and letters spanning both world wars are filled with bulletins and arguments, terrors of distant armies and next-door bombs and the precariousness of the entire civilization of which she knew herself to be a late, probably too exquisite bloom.
But Woolf's personal example is in the strength and the steady professionalism that kept her constantly at work - the overambitious failures as sweated over as the lyric triumphs.
www.nytimes.com /specials/magazine4/articles/woolf.html   (588 words)

  
 Woolf, Virginia, 1882-1941: free web books, online
Virginia Woolf (January 25, 1882 - March 28, 1941) was a English author and feminist.
In 1912 she married Leonard Woolf, a civil servant and political theorist.
Between the wars, Woolf was a significant figure in London literary society and a member of the Bloomsbury group.
etext.library.adelaide.edu.au /w/woolf/virginia   (187 words)

  
 The Virginia Woolf Society of Great Britain
Adeline Virginia Stephen was born on 25 January 1882 in London.
Her mother, Julia (1846-95), from whom Virginia inherited her looks, was the daughter and niece of the six beautiful Pattle sisters (Julia Margaret Cameron was the seventh: not beautiful but the only one remembered today).
Virginia was allowed uncensored access to her father’s extensive library, and from an early age determined to be a writer.
www.virginiawoolfsociety.co.uk /vw_res.biography.htm   (996 words)

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