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Topic: Virgo cluster


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M86

  
  Virgo - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Because of the presence of a galaxy cluster (consequently called the Virgo cluster) within its borders 5° to 10° west of ε Vir (Vindemiatrix), this constellation is especially rich in galaxies.
Astraea was known as the goddess of justice, and was identified as this constellation due to the presence of the scales of justice Libra nearby, and supposedly ruled the world at one point with her wise ways until mankind became so callous that she returned to skies in disgust.
The symbol for Virgo is the virgin or maiden.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Virgo   (686 words)

  
 Virgo cluster - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The cluster subtends a maximum arc of approximately 8 degrees centered in the constellation Virgo.
It is currently believed that the spirals of the cluster are distributed in a cigar-shaped prolate filament, approximately 4 times as long as wide, stretching along the line of sight from the Milky Way and connecting on its back end to the W cloud [2].
The large mass of the cluster is indicated by the high peculiar velocities of many of its galaxies, sometimes as high as 1,600 km/s with respect to the cluster's center.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Virgo_cluster   (442 words)

  
 Virgo Cluster
The Virgo Cluster completely dominates our small corner of the universe, and our entire Local Group of galaxies is being gravitationally drawn toward this huge concentration of matter (an effect known as the Virgo infall).
Recent observations have shown that the Cluster's principal axis is aligned with an immense filament that is part of the large-scale structure of the universe.
Abell 1367 itself forms one node of a well-known supercluster with the Coma Cluster, raising the intriguing possibility that the Virgo, Abell 1367, and Coma clusters may all be members of a colossal filamentary network.
www.daviddarling.info /encyclopedia/V/Virgo_Cluster.html   (280 words)

  
 Virgo cluster -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Virgo cluster is a (Click link for more info and facts about cluster of galaxies) cluster of galaxies, approximately 15 to 22 (Click link for more info and facts about Mpc) Mpc distant, comprising approximately 1300 (and possibly up to 2000) member galaxies.
The cluster subtends a maximum arc of approximately 8 degrees centered in the constellation (A large zodiacal constellation on the equator; between Leo and Libra) Virgo.
The cluster is an aggregrate of at least three separate (Click link for more info and facts about subclump) subclumps centered on the galaxies (Click link for more info and facts about M87) M87, (Click link for more info and facts about M86) M86, and (Click link for more info and facts about M49) M49.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/V/Vi/Virgo_cluster.htm   (383 words)

  
 Clusters of Galaxies   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The adjacent image shows the Virgo Cluster of galaxies, which is a nearby rich, irregular cluster that we shall discuss more in the next section.
In clusters the typical mass to light ratio is ~ 400 in units of solar masses divided by solar luminosities.
This cluster, which is 650 million light years distant, is rich in gas and dust and spiral galaxies with robust star formation, but relatively poor in elliptical galaxies.
csep10.phys.utk.edu /astr162/lect/gclusters/clusters.html   (254 words)

  
 Virgo Cluster   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The image shows the central portion of the Virgo Cluster of Galaxies, and is centered on the giant elliptical galaxy M87 which is considered to be the dominant galaxy of the whole giant cluster, situated close to its physical center.
The Virgo cluster is close enough that some of its galaxies, which happen to move fast through the cluster in our direction, exhibit the highest blue-shifts (instead of cosmological redshifts) measured for any galaxies, i.e.
Successfully navigating the Virgo cluster is the biggest challenge in the Messier Catalogue, and is affectionately known as "Heartbreak Ridge" to marathoners.
www.astro-tom.com /messier/messier_files/virgo_cluster.htm   (1755 words)

  
 Isolated Star-Forming Cloud Discovered in Intracluster Space (ESO Press Release 02/03)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Clusters of galaxies are believed to have formed because of the strong gravitational pull from dark and luminous matter.
The Virgo cluster is considered to be a relatively young cluster, because studies of the distribution of its member galaxies and X-ray investigations of hot cluster gas have revealed small "subclusters of galaxies" around the major galaxies Messier 87, Messier 86 and Messier 49.
This is considerably faster than the mean velocity of the Virgo cluster (about 1200 km/sec) but similar to that of NGC 4388 (2520 km/sec), indicating that it is probably falling through the Virgo cluster core together with NGC 4388, but it cannot have moved far during the comparatively short lifetime of its massive stars.
www.eso.org /outreach/press-rel/pr-2003/pr-02-03.html   (3173 words)

  
 Chandra :: Field Guide to X-ray Sources :: Virgo Cluster
Unlike the Coma Cluster, the Virgo cluster of galaxies is an "irregular" rich cluster.
Most of the Virgo Cluster's elliptical galaxies are near its center, while the majority of spiral galaxies are toward the outside.
The Virgo Cluster is so close to us that some galaxies in it have blue-shifts, meaning that they are moving towards us faster than the cluster is moving away.
chandra.harvard.edu /xray_sources/virgo   (404 words)

  
 Structure of the Virgo Cluster.
Regular clusters have been presumed to be more evolved and relaxed, and thus offer more promise for their understanding than an irregular cluster, such as Virgo, which at closer look, falls apart into several clouds of distinct structural and kinematical properties (deVaucouleurs/'s 1962, 1973).
However, there remains the fact that the mean velocity of cluster B is marginally smaller than that of the cluster A, which may be taken that the latter cluster is falling from behind, towards cluster A (note...Quite unexpectedly, neither primary galaxy [M87/M49] lies at the center of its cluster, not even in the luminosity-weighted distribution.
That they both belong to the same cluster is proven by their nearly equal velocity means, and by the fact that many spirals and irregulars-although scattered over the whole cluster area-show signs of interaction with the intergalactic medium of the cluster.
www.supernovae.net /struct.htm   (1795 words)

  
 Universe Today - The Virgo Galaxy Cluster is Still Being Formed
Clusters of galaxies are believed to have formed over a long period of time by the assembly of smaller entities, through the strong gravitational pull from dark and luminous matter.
The Virgo cluster is considered to be a relatively young cluster because previous studies have revealed small "sub-clusters of galaxies" around the major galaxies Messier 87, Messier 86 and Messier 49.
The first discoveries of intracluster stars in the Virgo cluster were made serendipitously by Italian astronomer, Magda Arnaboldi (Torino Observatory, Italy) and her colleagues, in 1996.
www.universetoday.com /am/publish/virgo_galaxy_cluster_still_forming.html?22102004   (1888 words)

  
 The Virgo Cluster of Galaxies
The Virgo Cluster with its some 2000 member galaxies dominates our intergalactic neighborhood, as it represents the physical center of our Local Supercluster (also called Virgo or Coma-Virgo Supercluster), and influences all the galaxies and galaxy groups by the gravitational attraction of its enormous mass.
Our image shows the central portion of the Virgo Cluster of Galaxies, and is centered on the giant elliptical galaxy M87 which is considered to be the dominant galaxy of the whole giant cluster, situated close to its physical center.
Semi-recent HST observations (from the 1990s) of Cepheids in M100, as well as estimates from the globular cluster luminosity in M87, together with the work of Nial R. Tanvir and, again, HST observations, on the M96 group, extrapolated to this cluster, indicate that the Virgo cluster is at a distance of some 60 million light-years.
www.seds.org /messier/more/virgo.html   (1116 words)

  
 The Virgo and Coma Rich Clusters   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Virgo Cluster of galaxies lies at a distance of about 16 Mpc, near the intersection of the constellations Virgo and Coma Berenices.
Although spirals are more numerous (65% of the 205 brightest galaxies in the Virgo Cluster are spirals), the 4 brightest galaxies are giant ellipticals, with M87 being the largest and brightest of these.
The nearest regular rich cluster lies approximately 15 degrees north of the Virgo Cluster in the constellation Coma Berenices.
csep10.phys.utk.edu /astr162/lect/gclusters/virgo-coma.html   (289 words)

  
 Virgo cluster - FreeEncyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Virgo cluster is the nearest rich galaxy cluster.
Its large mass is also shown by the high peculiar velocities[?] of many of its galaxies, sometimes as high as 1,600 km/s (with respect to the cluster's center).
The giant M87 galaxy is believed to be the dominating member of this cluster.
openproxy.ath.cx /vi/Virgo_cluster.html   (103 words)

  
 APOD: 2001 January 26 - Galaxies Of The Virgo Cluster   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Explanation: Well over a thousand galaxies are known members of the Virgo Cluster, the closest large cluster of galaxies to our own local group.
In fact, a close examination of the image will reveal that many of the "stars" are actually surrounded by a telltale fuzz, indicating that they are Virgo Cluster galaxies.
Virgo Cluster galaxies are measured to be about 48 million light-years away.
antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov /apod/ap010126.html   (184 words)

  
 Virgo Supercluster - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It contains about 100 groups and clusters of galaxies and is dominated by the Virgo cluster near its center.
The Local Group is located near the edge and is drawn towards the Virgo cluster.
As its luminosity is far too small for this number of stars, it is thought that a large part of its mass is dark matter.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Virgo_Supercluster   (195 words)

  
 The Virgo Mainline   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
This region is the center of the great Virgo cluster of galaxies, which at a distance of roughly 40 million light years is the nearest rich aggregation of galaxies in the sky.
The combined "cluster of clusters" is dubbed the local supercluster and probably includes our own local group of galaxies on the outskirts.
For amateur observers the task of attacking the Virgo cluster is daunting.
www.angelfire.com /id/jsredshift/virgo.htm   (951 words)

  
 Virgo
Virgo is unique in that it is the only constellation containing all the Bayer stars with no additional superscript letters or numbers: just the Greek alphabet from alpha to omega.
This is one of the largest galaxies associated with the Virgo Cluster, and may have a mass of fifty billion Suns.
M87 is the centre of the Virgo Cluster, and is one of the most luminous galaxies known.
www.dibonsmith.com /vir_con.htm   (1145 words)

  
 Virgo cluster   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Virgo cluster is a galaxy clustercluster of galaxies, approximately 15 to 22 megaparsecMpc distant, comprising approximately 1300 (and possibly up to 2000) member galaxies.
It is As of 2004currently believed that the spirals of the cluster are distributed in a cigar-shaped prolate spheroidprolate filament, approximately 4 times as long as wide, stretching along the line of sight from the Milky Way and connecting on its back end to the W cloud/ [http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu./cgi-bin/nph-ex_refcode?refcode=1993ApJ...412L..13F].
The large mass of the cluster is indicated by the high peculiar velocitypeculiar velocities of many of its galaxies, sometimes as high as 1,600 km/seconds/ with respect to the cluster's center.
www.infothis.com /find/Virgo_cluster   (407 words)

  
 Universe Today - Virgo Cluster Sucks in Distant Galaxy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Located in the Virgo galaxy cluster, this enormous elliptical galaxy is moving at about 3 million miles per hour through diffuse hot gas that pervades the cluster.
The infall of the galaxy into the cluster is an example of the process by which galaxy groups and galaxy clusters form over the course of billions of years.
This expansion is carrying the Virgo cluster away from us at a speed of about 2 million miles per hour, but M86 is falling into the Virgo cluster from the far side of the cluster, giving it a net velocity of about one million miles per hour toward Earth.
www.universetoday.com /am/publish/printer_virgo_cluster_distant_galaxy.html   (285 words)

  
 The Virgo Cluster of Galaxies in the Making (ESO Press Release 24/04)
At a distance of approximately 50 million light-years, the Virgo Cluster is the nearest galaxy cluster.
An image of the core of the cluster obtained with the Wide Field Imager camera at the ESO La Silla Observatory was published last year as PR Photo 04a/03.
The international team of astronomers [2] went on further to make a detailed study of the motions of the planetary nebulae in the Virgo cluster in order to determine its dynamical structure and compare it with numerical simulations.
www.eso.org /outreach/press-rel/pr-2004/pr-24-04.html   (2102 words)

  
 2MASS XSC Explanatory Supplement
The Virgo mosaics are full of faint point sources that are undoubtedly galaxies (based on their "soft" surface brightness and "red" colors).
The "Heart of Virgo" region consists of the central three square degrees of the cluster, bordered by M87 in the south, and the Markarian Chain of galaxies to the north (including M84, M86).
Virgo lies within the supergalactic plane of nearby galaxy clusters (see for example the XSC allsky image).
spider.ipac.caltech.edu /staff/jarrett/2mass/XSC/jarrett_virgo.html   (945 words)

  
 The ACS Virgo Cluster Survey: Publications   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Virgo Cluster is the dominant mass concentration in the Local Supercluster and the largest collection of elliptical and lenticular galaxies in the nearby universe.
The scientific goals of this survey include an exploration of the three-dimensional structure of the Virgo Cluster and a critical examination of the usefulness of the globular cluster luminosity function as a distance indicator.
Distances derived from these measurements are needed to explore the three-dimensional structure of the Virgo Cluster, study the intrinsic parameters of globular clusters associated with the program galaxies, and compare with the galaxy distances derived from globular cluster luminosity functions.
www.physics.rutgers.edu /~pcote/acs/publications.html   (3056 words)

  
 Peoria Astronomical Society - Learning Topics-Virgo (The Virgin)
Virgo the Goddess probably originated when the Sun was in Virgo during the spring equinox, the time of the Egyptian harvest.
While Virgo is in the underworld, winter reigns, when she returns with him in the spring, the season renew.
M-59 is a member of the Virgo cluster of galaxies, and one of the larger elliptical galaxies there, although it is considerably less luminous and massive than the greatest ellipticals in this cluster.
www.astronomical.org /portal/modules/wfsection/article.php?articleid=86   (531 words)

  
 The Virgo Cluster   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Virgo Cluster is the one of the nearest large clusters of galaxies.
Their catalogue of cluster members, the Virgo Cluster Catalog, was published in 1985 (Astronomical Journal, 90, 1681-1758).
Another survey of the central region of the cluster by Impey, Bothun and Malin (Astrophysical Journal, 330, 634) identified many large low surface brightness galaxies which have such low contrast against the sky that they were not included in the Virgo Cluster Catalog.
www.star.bris.ac.uk /jbj/virgo.html   (203 words)

  
 Heron Island Proceedings: Tonry: Section 2
The Virgo cluster is apparent as a concentration at SGX = -4 Mpc, SGY = 15 Mpc, but the sampling is sparse enough and the distances are uncertain enough to be sure of the detailed structure.
The Virgo W cloud is seen as four points at -8, +26, very substantially behind the main cluster.
Thus, the Virgo infall is obvious in the overall flow pattern, and doesn't depend on the precise velocity of the Virgo core at all.
msowww.anu.edu.au /~heron/Tonry/tonry_p2.html   (979 words)

  
 Completing HI observations of galaxies in the Virgo Cluster   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Virgo cluster HI mass as derived for this optically selected galaxy sample is in agreement with the HIMF derived for the Virgo cluster from the blind HIJASS HI survey and inconsistent with the Field HIMF.
This indicates that, both in this rich cluster and in the general field, neutral hydrogen is primarily associated with late-type galaxies, with marginal contributions from early-type galaxies and isolated HI clouds.
The inconsistency between the cluster and the field HIMF derives primarily from the difference in the optical luminosity function of late-type galaxies in the two environments, combined with the HI deficiency that is known to occur to galaxies in rich clusters.
www.gb.nrao.edu /~koneil/paps/gavazzi.html   (198 words)

  
 Intracluster Stars and the Structure of the Virgo Galaxy Cluster
The distribution of planetaries suggests that the cluster is significantly extended along the line of sight, and that galaxies apparently within its projected core cannot be regarded as being at the same distance.
Measuring the distance to the nearby Virgo cluster of galaxies has long been considered by many to be a critical step along the path to measuring the Hubble constant.
If Virgo is compact and "relaxed," then most of the galaxies in its core can be assumed to be at the same distance, while if it were highly-structured and poorly organized, it's problematic to relate distance measures to various galaxies within the cluster to each other.
www.noao.edu /noao/noaonews/dec98/node2.html   (814 words)

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