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Topic: Vocative case


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 Accusative case - LearnThis.Info Enclyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The accusative case of a noun is, generally, the case used to mark the direct object of a verb.
The accusative case exists (or existed once) in all the Indo-European languages (including Latin, Sanskrit, Greek, German, Russian), in the Finno-Ugric languages, and in Semitic languages (such as Arabic).
This is the form in nominative case, used for the subject of a sentence.
encyclopedia.learnthis.info /a/ac/accusative_case.html   (370 words)

  
 Vocative case: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The nominative case is a grammatical case for a noun....
The dative case is a grammatical case for nouns and/or pronouns....
The accusative case of a noun is the grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a verb....
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/v/vo/vocative_case.htm   (1970 words)

  
 ipedia.com: List of linguistic topics Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
dangling modifier - dative case - decipherment - declension - defective verb - descriptive linguistics - dental consonant - derivation - determiner - diacritic - diaeresis - dialect - dictionary - diphthong - discourse - double acute accent - dual grammatical number
ecolect - eggcorn - elative case - endangered language - English pronunciation - entailment - ergative case - error - essive case - Ethnologue - etymology - etymologist - evolutionary linguistics - example-based machine translation - expletive
variety - velar consonant - verb - verb phrase - Verner's law - vocative case - vowel - vowel harmony - vowel stems - VOS - SVO
www.ipedia.com /list_of_linguistic_topics.html   (573 words)

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