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Topic: Voiceless alveolar affricate


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In the News (Tue 11 Dec 18)

  
 Voiceless alveolar lateral affricate - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The voiceless alveolar lateral affricate is a common sound in the languages of western North America.
The voiceless alveolar lateral affricate is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages.
Its place of articulation is alveolar, which means it is articulated with either the tip or the blade of the tongue against the alveolar ridge, termed respectively apical and laminal.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Voiceless_alveolar_lateral_affricate   (297 words)

  
 Ga - UPSID Language Profile
segaff(n, [palatalized, voiceless, dental_alveolar, sibilant, affricate], [bulgarian, yurak]).
segaff(n, [voiceless, palato_alveolar, sibilant, ejective, affricate], [e_armenian, zulu, tigre, amharic, dizi, haida, tlingit, navaho, chipewyan, tolowa, hupa, wintu, chontal, k7ekchi, mazahua, nootka, quileute, squamish, puget_sound, yana, shasta, zuni, acoma, dakota, yuchi, wappo, itonama, quechua, jaqaru, gununa_kena, georgian, lak, xu]).
segaff(n, [palatalized, voiceless, aspirated, palato_alveolar, sibilant, affricate], [kashmiri]).
www.langmaker.com /db/ups_ga.htm   (2431 words)

  
 Lungtu Consonants
Note that all the stops, affricates and fricatives are voiceless, though alphabets such as "d" or "dz" are used.
www.ling.hawaii.edu /~uhdoc/lungtutwo/conso.htm   (38 words)

  
 Bulgarian language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
During the palatalization of most hard consonants (the bilabial, labiodental and alveolar ones), the middle part of the tongue is lifted towards the palatum resulting in the formation of a second articulatory centre whereby the specific palatal "clang" of the soft consonants is achieved.
The articulation of alveolars Template:IPA, Template:IPA and Template:IPA, however, usually does not follow that rule, the palatal clang is achieved by moving the place of articulation further back towards the palatum so that Template:IPA, Template:IPA and Template:IPA are actually alveopalatal (postalvelolar) consonants.
The only consonant without a counterpart is the voiceless velar fricative [x].
www.worldslastchance.com /encyclopedia/index.php/Bulgarian_language   (3035 words)

  
 Oriental Name Construction for Authors of Fantasy
This is an aspirated voiceless alveolar plosive, as in 'TORE'
This is a voiceless blade-alveolar fricative, as in 'SHY'.
SA, SHI, SU, SE, SO 'S' is usually a voiceless alveolar fricative, as in 'SAFE', except when it precedes an 'I', in which case it becomes a voiceless alveo-palatal fricative as in 'SHEET'.
modzer0.cs.uaf.edu /~logan/names.html   (2553 words)

  
 Affricate consonant - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Affricates may also be contrasted by palatalization, as in the Erzya language, where voiceless alveolar, postalveolar and palatal affricates are contrasted.
Also less common are alveolar affricates where the fricative is lateral, such as the [tɬ] sound found in Nahuatl and Totonac.
Many Athabaskan languages (such as Chipewyan and Navajo) have series of coronal affricates which may be unaspirated, aspirated, or ejective in addition to being interdental/dental, alveolar, postalveolar, or lateral, i.e.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Affricate_consonant   (2553 words)

  
 biology - Lateral consonant
Rarer lateral consonants include the sound of Welsh ll, which is the voiceless alveolar lateral fricative [&;], and the retroflex laterals as can be found in most Hindustani languages.
One, found before vowels as in lady or fly, is called clear l, pronounced as the alveolar lateral approximant [l] with a "neutral" position of the body of the tongue.
The other variant, so-called dark l found before consonants word-finally as in bold or tell, is pronounced as the velarized alveolar lateral approximant [&;] with the tongue assuming a spoon-like shape and its back part raised, which gives the sound an [w]-like resonance.
www.biologydaily.com /biology/Lateral_consonant   (308 words)

  
 The Daltaí Boards: What does a glide resembling § , or t'§ sound like in Irish?
The "sh" part, that is. "Tch" is a voiceless palato-alveolar affricate.
The affricate t´§ is that represented by "tch" in "watch," or the fairly similar but somewhat differently articulated Irish sound as described by Éamonn Mhac an Fhailigh.
The "alveolar ridge" or "alveolar process" is, therefore, dem bones inside o' de gums.
www.daltai.com /discus/messages/13510/13372.html?1107173866   (432 words)

  
 International Phonetic Alphabet @ HockeyLiving.com
The six most common affricates are optionally represented by ligatures, though this is no longer official IPA usage, due to the great number of ligatures that would be required to represent all affricates this way.
Affricates and doubly articulated stops are represented by two symbols joined by a tie bar, either above or below the symbols.
For example, all the retroflex consonants have the same symbol as the equivalent alveolar consonant, with the addition of a rightward pointing hook at the bottom.
www.hockeyliving.com /info/International_Phonetic_Alphabet   (4670 words)

  
 Sounds
) is a voiceless alveolar affricate which sounds like the underlined sound in the English word 'chair', for example:
) is a voiceless alveolar fricative which sounds like the underlined sound in the English words 'sun' or 'stand', for example:
Affricates are a combination of a stop plus a fricative: the full closure is made as if for a stop, but then opened a little which creates the audible friction.
www.potawatomilang.org /Reference/Grammar/Phonology/sounds.html   (4017 words)

  
 Phonology
Notable for their absence from the suggested Lang25 phonology are the common English phonemes /θ/ and /ð/ (/dh/ and /th/) the voiced and voiceless dental fricatives- as in "the" and "thin".
Similarly the IPA values should be regarded as indicative rather than definitive: for instance, anyone should be at liberty to pronounce a voiced alveolar "r" sound as /ɾ/ - a tap or flap, as /r/ - a trill, or as /ɹ/ - an approximant, so long as the word being uttered is recognisable.
This might tend to be rejected as unprecedented, but the "letter shape" is surely appropriate, and the voiceless uvular plosive [q] is right next to the voiced velar plosive [g] in any case.
www.appledene.karoo.net /phonology.html   (893 words)

  
 Chipewyan - UPSID Language Profile
segaff(n, [voiceless, palato_alveolar, sibilant, ejective, affricate], [e_armenian, zulu, tigre, amharic, dizi, haida, tlingit, navaho, chipewyan, tolowa, hupa, wintu, chontal, k7ekchi, mazahua, nootka, quileute, squamish, puget_sound, yana, shasta, zuni, acoma, dakota, yuchi, wappo, itonama, quechua, jaqaru, gununa_kena, georgian, lak, xu]).
segaff(n, [voiceless, aspirated, dental_alveolar, sibilant, affricate], [kashmiri, e_armenian, mongolian, lakkia, adzera, mandarin, hakka, changchow, amoy, fuchow, kan, yao, chipewyan, mazahua, zuni, wiyot, yuchi, lak, burushaski]).
segaff(n, [voiceless, dental_alveolar, lateral, ejective, affricate], [ik, haida, tlingit, chipewyan, nootka, squamish]).
www.langmaker.com /db/ups_chipewyan.htm   (893 words)

  
 :.Indian Encyclopedia.:
Also less common are alveolar affricates where the fricative is lateral, such as the [tɬ] sound found in Nahuatl and Totonac.
Many Athabaskan languages (such as Chipewyan and Navajo) have series of coronal affricates which may be unaspirated, aspirated, or ejective in addition to being interdental/dental, alveolar, postalveolar, or lateral, i.e.
Affricate consonants begin like stops (most often an alveovelar, such as [t] or [d]) and that doesn't have a release of its own, but opens directly into a fricative such as [s] or [z] (or, in one language, into a trill).
www.indianencyclopedia.com /index.php?title=Affricate   (893 words)

  
 Kolagian Orthography
For example, few Kolagian languages use the phonetic sound represented as [c], a voiceless palatal stop, but many languages have a voiceless post-alveolar affricate, [ʧ].
A voiceless alveolar click, for example, is {k!t}.
The entire retroflex column is built by capitalizing or underlining the symbols from the alveolar column.
www.io.com /~hmiller/lang/rko4.html   (787 words)

  
 Voiceless postalveolar affricate - FrathWiki
The voiceless postalveolar affricate is a quite common sound cross-linguistically.
Unless otherwise stated, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons License.
wiki.frath.net /Voiceless_postalveolar_affricate   (71 words)

  
 biology - Polish language
In consonant clusters all consonants are either voiced or voiceless.
Polish consonant system is more complicated and its characteristic features are series of affricate and palatal consonants.
Within this consonant system one can distinguish three series of fricatives and affricates:
www.biologydaily.com /biology/Polish_language   (2081 words)

  
 Tirèlhat script and pronunciation
(ch) A voiceless post-alveolar affricate, [ʧ], as in "chipmunk".
(c) A voiceless alveolar affricate, [ʦ], as in "pizza".
(lh) A voiceless alveolar lateral fricative, [&;], as in Welsh "lliw".
www.io.com /~hmiller/lang/Tirelhat/script.html   (781 words)

  
 Lateral
Lateral voiceless alveolar fricative The lateral voiceless alveolar fricative is a type of consonantal sound, used in so...
Lateral alveolar approximant The lateral alveolar approximant is a type of consonantal sound, used in some velarized lat...
Lateral alveolar flap The lateral alveolar flap is a type of consonantal sound, used in some X-SAMPA symbol is l\\.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /topics/lateral.html   (781 words)

  
 Learn more about SAMPA chart in the online encyclopedia.
'Note': It is (specially in Spanish and Italian) common use to represent the alveolar trill with [rr] and the alveolar flap with [r].
Note that you will need a font that supports the Unicode IPA Extensions to see the IPA characters.
www.onlineencyclopedia.org /s/sa/sampa_chart.html   (579 words)

  
 Church Slavonic Pronunciation - Help Me Learn Church Slavonic
voiceless dental affricate; articulated with the tongue very low; hard consonant: the following vowel must be a back vowel regardless of how it is written
voiceless bilabial affricate (compound of and sounds); used for borrowings from Greek
voiceless velar affricate (compound of and sounds); used for borrowings from Greek
justin.zamora.com /slavonic/alphabet/pronunciation.html   (499 words)

  
 LINGVA XRONARI
fricative, d = voiced alveolar plosive, f = voiceless labiodental fricative, g = voiced velar plosive, gh = voiced uvular plosive, h = voiced glottal fricative,
vowel, ui = short or long close front rounded vowel, b = voiced bilabial plosive, c = voiceless grooved alveopalatal affricate, ch = voiceless uvular
voiced alveolar trill, rh = voiced velar fricative,
www.christusrex.org /www1/pater/JPN-l-xronari.html   (107 words)

  
 Introduction to Linguistics
Note: There are two sounds here, the voiceless alveolar stop [t] and the voiceless alveolar affricate, which I represent as [ts].
Note: I am using [c] here to represent the voiceless palatal fricative.
/R/ becomes voiceless ([R*]) at the ends of words;
people.ucsc.edu /~aissen/midterm.html   (789 words)

  
 SLAVËNI
The letter ‚h‘ is voiceless before any voiceless consonant and in final position.
When precedes a voiced consonant or between vowels it should be pronounced as voiced Czech "h" in "hrad",
www.sweb.cz /ls78/slaveni1.htm   (50 words)

  
 Native Languages of North America
Among the sounds of Zoque are [c], a voiceless alveolar affricate and [3], a voiced alveolar affricate.
This data is from Zoque, a language spoken in southern Mexico that belongs to the Mixe-Zoque group of languages.
Observe the data, and answer the questions that follow.
www.ic.arizona.edu /ic/ling210/210homework1.html   (143 words)

  
 General phonetics - Wikimedia Commons
Affricates and double articulations can be represented by two symbols joined by a tie bar if necessary, or represented by a ligature in the case of the six commonest affricates:
commons.wikimedia.org /wiki/General_phonetics   (143 words)

  
 List of phonetics topics
\n* acoustic phonetics \n* affricate \n* airstream mechanism \n* allophone \n* alveolar approximant \n* alveolar consonant \n* alveolar ejective fricative \n* alveolar ejective \n* alveolar flap \n* alveolar nasal \n* alveolar ridge \n* alveolar trill \n* alveolo-palatal consonant \n*apical consonant\n* approximant consonant \n* articulatory phonetics \n* aspiration \n*auditory phonetics
encyclopedia.codeboy.net /wikipedia/l/li/list_of_phonetics_topics.html   (143 words)

  
 Definition of Lateral consonant
Rarer lateral consonants include the sound of Welsh ll, which is a voiceless lateral fricative, and the retroflex laterals as can be found in most Hindustani languages.
English has the alveolar lateral [l], which in many accents has two allophones.
Laterals are "L"-like consonants pronounced with an occlusion made somewhere along the axis of the tongue, while air from the lungs escapes at one side or both sides of the tongue.
www.wordiq.com /definition/Lateral_consonant   (143 words)

  
 International Phonetic Alphabet for English - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A distinction is made in English between affricates and a sequence of a stop and fricative, because a syllable boundary never separates those affricates, but it might separate stop/fricative sequences.
The voiceless stops [p], [t], and [k] are aspirated when they occur at the beginning of stressed or word-initial syllables.
It is frequently written [r] in broad transcription of English, since the alveolar trill (the sound for which [r] is normally reserved) does not occur in most dialects of English.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/International_Phonetic_Alphabet_for_English   (143 words)

  
 A Mekegi Dargi text with interlinear glosses
Transcription: C' ejective consonant; ch = voiceless alveolar affricate; sh = voiceless alveolar fricative; zh = voiced alveolar fricative; gh = voiced velar fricative; G = voiced uvular stop; H = voiceless pharyngeal stop; ¿= voiced pharyngeal stop;?
The text was recorded in November 2001 at the Max Planck Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, Leipzig, using a minidisc recorder.
The following signs are used: - inflectional morpheme boundery, = derivational morpheme boundery, + compositional morpheme boundery, <> infix; a dot (.) is used for more clarity in some petrified morphemes; a colon (:) is used in the glosses to indicate a.
email.eva.mpg.de /~vandenbe/Mekegi.html   (1106 words)

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