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Topic: Votadini


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In the News (Thu 20 Jun 19)

  
  Cunedda - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
One traditional interpretation identifies Padarn as a Roman (or Romano-British) official of reasonably high rank who had been placed in command of Votadini troops stationed in the Clackmannanshire region of Scotland in the 380s or earlier by the Emperor Magnus Maximus.
Given that the archaeological record demonstrates Irish settlement on the Lleyn peninsula however and possible raids as far west as Wroxeter by the late 4th century, it is difficult to conceive of either Roman or allied British forces having presented an effective defence in Wales.
According to this version of events, Vortigern would have instructed Cunedda and his Votadini subjects to move to Wales in response to the aforementioned Irish incursions no later than the year 442, when Vortigern's former Saxon allies rebelled against his rule.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Cunedda   (617 words)

  
 Votadini - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Numerous hillforts and settlements support the image of quarrelsome tribes and petty kingdoms recorded by the Romans, though evidence that at times occupants neglected the defences might suggest that symbolic power was sometimes as significant as warfare.
In the 1st century the Romans recorded the Votadini as a British tribe.
After the Roman withdrawal in the early 5th century, the lands of the Votadini became part of the Kingdom of the North, which broke up in the later part of the 5th century.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Votadini   (596 words)

  
 NationMaster.com - Encyclopedia: Votadini   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Gododdin (pronounced god-o-th-in), or Guotodin (Votadini in Latin), refers to both the people and to the region of a Dark Ages Brythonic kingdom south of the Firth of Forth, extending from the Stirling area to the Northumberland kingdom of Brynaich, and including what are now the Lothian...
During the Roman occupation, the Votadini were allies of the Empire, a relationship which may have been formally recognized by Magnus Maximus in 383.
In the 1st century the Romans recorded the Votadini as a British tribe in the area, and about 600 the poem Y Gododdin using the Brythonic form of that name describes warriors feasting in Eidin's great hall.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Votadini   (2670 words)

  
 England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
North Votadini, Northumbria, Oxford, Pengwern, Rheged, Richmond, Sark, Somerset, South Rheged, South Votadini, Surrey, Sussex, the Trinovantes, the Votadini, Warwick, Wessex, Westminster, York (Archbishops) and York (Dukes).
A Votadini sub-kingdom, the precursor to the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Bernicia.
A post-Roman petty Kingdom in north-central Britain, one of the divisions of the Votadini.
www.hostkingdom.net /engl.html   (4134 words)

  
 about votadini   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
The Votadini were a Celtic tribe inhabiting the Borders region and the Scottish lowlands in the Roman period.
Metal smiths and horsemen, the Votadini were a capable military force and received silver from the Romans, presumably as wages for protecting the frontier from the Picts.
The Votadini gave the Welsh the symbol of the dragon.
www.votadinimcc.co.uk /pages/about.htm   (463 words)

  
 Gododdin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Gododdin (pronounced [go'doĆ°in]) were a Brythonic people of north-eastern Britain in the sub-Roman period, best known as the subject of the 7th century Welsh series of poems known as Y Gododdin, attributed to Aneirin.
It is not known exactly how far the kingdom of the Gododdin extended, possibly from the Stirling area to the Northumberland kingdom of 'Bryneich', and including what are now the Lothian and Borders regions of eastern Scotland.
By about 470 most of the Votadini's lands became the kingdom of Gododdin, while the southern part of their territory between the Tweed and the Tyne seems to have become a separate kingdom called Bryneich.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Gododdin   (513 words)

  
 NationMaster.com - Encyclopedia: Gododdin   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Gododdin (pronounced god-o-th-in), or Guotodin (Votadini in Latin), refers to both the people and to the region of a Dark Ages Brythonic kingdom south of the Firth of Forth, extending from the Stirling area to the Northumberland kingdom of 'Brynaich', and including what are now the Lothian and Borders regions of eastern Scotland.
In the 6th century Brynaich was invaded by the Angles and become known as Bernicia.
Gododdin is the Welsh word for the Votadini tribe inhabiting the banks of the Firth of Forth.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Gododdin   (1804 words)

  
 Gododdin   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Gododdin was the kingdom of the Votadini, a British tribe.
The poem Y Gododdin by the bard Aneirin, written in Brythonic (a medieval Celt ic language closely akin to Welsh) tells the tale of the last days of Gododdin in its fatal struggle with Bernicia near the end of the 7th century (c.
Prior to the battle of Catraeth in the late 7th century, the Votadini (known later as 'Gododdin') may have inhabited the region now known as Lothian and a substantial area to the south-east of that for as long as 1,000 years before the arrival of the Romans.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Gododdin.html   (897 words)

  
 Votadini - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
The Votadini were people in the eastern half of the ancient British kingdom of the North which included the modern South of Scotland and North of England.
The name is a Latin version of the Brythonic form of the name, Goutodin or Gododdin, which refers to both the people and to the region.
After his death the North began to divide, and by about 470 most Votadini lands became the separate kingdom of Gododdin, while the southern Votadini territory between the River Tweed and the River Tyne formed its own separate kingdom called Brynaich.
www.encyclopedia-online.info /Votadini   (630 words)

  
 Dunbar Castle   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Dunbar Castle and the surrounding area is on the Celtic tribal land of the Votadini, a term coined by the Romans, who inhabited the area until around 600AD.
In this early tribal period, the Votadini held a small fort protected by a ditch and earth wall.
In their version, the fortress and original castle were referred to as Dunbar in translation of the local Votadini gaelic as 'Dun' - a castle/tower on 'bar' a height/top/extremity.
www.2ndlookdesign.com /dunbarcastle/firstpage.html   (469 words)

  
 Votadini: Facts and details from Encyclopedia Topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
The Votadini were people in the eastern half of the ancient British Briton quick summary:
Gododdin, or in its earlier version guotodin, and even earlier votadini, refers to both the people and to the region of a dark ages british kingdom south of...
Hadrians wall (in latin: valens hadriani) was a stone and turf fortification, built by the romans across the width of great britain to prevent...
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/v/vo/votadini.htm   (2319 words)

  
 King Arthur's Black Descendants
The female lines were connected to the Votadini Tribe of Northern Wales, as were the males.
From the north they were under threat from the Picts, from the west, the Irish, and from the east, the Angles.
According to Lewis family historians, the Votadini joined forces with King Arthur, agreeing to fight against Ireland and the invaders from the north.
hnn.us /articles/6343.html   (1288 words)

  
 Untitled
One son, Garbaniawn (or Germanianus) ruled the southern Votadini, the territory known to the British as Bryneich, which became Bernicia under the Angles.
Nothing more is known about either of them, but it is likely that their main fort was at Bamburgh, and that most of their lives would have been in fighting the Picts and the increasing onslaught of the Angles and Saxons who began th harry the eastern coasts during Garbaniawn's reign.
Morcant Bulc, seems to have ruled the Votadini, south of Edinburgh in the early part of the sixth century.
www.users.uswest.net /~butchmatt/CoelHenNotes.html   (1345 words)

  
 INSIGHT Magazine - The Cruiskeen
Of these, five are within the territory of the West Brigantes; three from the Votadini; four roughly in the area of the tribes west of the Votadini, i.e.
The focus on the west Brigantes is not so much a clear clustering pattern in the distribution map as it is an effect of the size of the tribes' territory.
Two areas are well known for the manufacture of various bronze decorative trade objects: the Votadini with their main workshop at Traprain Law and the Brigantes with their workshop at Settle.
homepage.eircom.net /~archaeology/two/lambay.htm   (1816 words)

  
 Lewis Name History - Page 2 of 2
This was the region of the Votadini tribe, a tribe from the migrations of Celts from the Caucasus area in Asia, crossing Europe and finally settling the British Isles.
After the Roman invasion of Britain, including everything south of Hadrian's wall, of which the Votadini tribe was one of the most northern tribes to fall under the Romans, our ancestors were given Latin names as well as their Celtic names.
As the region was largely uninhabited by the Welsh, Vortigern saw this as a golden opportunity to provide a buffer zone between southern Wales, an unpopulated and largely wilderness area of the north, and populate it with a formidable ally, namely the Votadini.
www.senclewises.com /history2.html   (1938 words)

  
 Caledonia - Province of the Roman Empire
Having already pacified the Votadini tribe, his sweep across the central lowlands was bloody and decisive.
On the east coast were the Votadini, whose people lived as far north as the River Forth.
The Votadini had their capital on a hill in East Lothian called Traprain Law.
www.unrv.com /provinces/caledonia.php   (2701 words)

  
 Kingdoms of British Celts - Goutodin
The later name of Lothian has its base in Goutodin (or later, Gododdin), which itself is a late British version of Votadini, the tribe which settled that area (Gododdin =Goutodin =Votidini).
The border of Goutodin extended less far south than the Votadini lands, probably terminating at Berwick, a scene of later conflict with the Bernician Angles.
This region, between Hadrian's and the Antonine Walls, was under direct Roman military rule between AD 138-162, and after that was organised as a buffer state, reaping many of the rewards of alliance with Rome, but not under its rule.
www.kessler-web.co.uk /History/KingListsBritain/BritainGoutodin.htm   (577 words)

  
 BBC - History - Tribes of Britain   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
The Votadini were a very large tribe or people that lived in the south east of Scotland.
It is not clear where the boundary between the Votadini and the other large tribe, the Brigantes, was, although it probably frequently shifted as a result of wars and as smaller tribes and communities changed allegiances.
The Votadini, like the Brigantes, were a group made up of smaller tribes, unfortunately the names of these smaller tribes and communities remain unknown.
www.bbc.co.uk /history/ancient/prehistory/iron_02.shtml   (4586 words)

  
 12 - From Caesar to Claudius
In the area we now call southern Scotland were a number of tribes which included the Votadini, the Novantae, the Selgovae and the Damnonii.
The Votadini lived in the eastern coastal regions and between the Tyne and the Clyde, the Novantae in the area of Galloway and Dumfriesshire, the south- west, while the Selgovae occupied the area between them.
In the northern and western isles it has been calculated that there were some 500 local chieftains ruling small areas from their individual brochs and representing the situation that existed in the early Iron Age further south.
www.btinternet.com /~ron.wilcox/onlinetexts/onlinetexts-chap12.htm   (2494 words)

  
 Gododdin   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Gododdin was the kingdom of the Votadini, a Brythonic tribe, occupying what is now the Lothian region of eastern Scotland.
The poem Y Gododdin by the bard Aneirin, written in Brythonic (a medieval Celtic language closely akin to Welsh)tells the tale of the last days of Gododdin in its fatal struggle with Bernicia,near the end of the 7th century (c.
Prior to the battle ofCatraeth in the late 7th century, the Votadini (known later as 'Gododdin') may have inhabited the region now known as Lothian and a substantial area to the south-east of that for as long as 1,000 yearsbefore the arrival of the Romans.
www.therfcc.org /gododdin-13380.html   (213 words)

  
 British Archaeology magazine, February 2001   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Between 600 BC and the Roman incursions at the end of the 1st century ad, clearly datable artefacts are harder to identify, but it seems probable that at least some of the visible ramparts belong to this period.
Furthermore, the absence of Roman marching camps and military installations in the agricultural heartlands of East Lothian suggests that authority continued to be asserted from Traprain itself.
It would seem, therefore, that the Votadini had allied themselves with Rome and may even have been, at certain times, a buffer state on the edge of the Empire.
www.britarch.ac.uk /ba/ba57/feat1.html   (1506 words)

  
 St Ebba and Coldingham Priory Website
During the period of the Romans, the area of the country north of Yorkshire was never settled by them.
The Romans used the native people in S.E. Scotland (the Votadini) as a buffer against the fierce tribes from further north.
The main settlement of the Votadini was on Dunpender (Traprain Law), a whale-backed hill between Haddington and East Linton.
www.stebba-coldinghampriory.org.uk /web/stebbabefore.htm   (194 words)

  
 [No title]
Where the boundary between the Votadini and the other large tribe, the Brigantes, who lived in northern England lay is not clear.
The Votadini, like the Brigantes, were a group made up of smaller tribes.
Archaeologically, the territory of the Votadini was very different to that of either the Venicones or the Novantae.
www.gallica.co.uk /celts/tribes.htm   (4524 words)

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