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Topic: Vulgar Latin


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In the News (Wed 20 Mar 19)

  
  Latin
Latin was first brought to the Italian peninsula in the 9th or 8th century BC by migrants from the north, who settled in the Latium region, specifically around the River Tiber, where the Roman civilization first developed.
Latin was influenced by the Celtic dialects and the non-Indo-European Etruscan language in northern Italy, and by Greek in southern Italy.
Latin was once taught in many of the schools in Britain with academic leanings—perhaps 25% of the total.[1] However, the requirement for it was gradually abandoned in the professions such as law and medicine, and then, from around the late 1960s, for admission to university.
www.latinlatest.co.uk   (1737 words)

  
  Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin is a blanket term covering the vernacular dialects of the Latin language spoken in the vast provinces of the Roman Empire starting from the second and 3rd century CE, until its direct merging with the early romance idioms.
Vulgar Latin developed differently in the various provinces of the Roman Empire, thus gradually giving rise to modern French, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, etc. Although the official language was Latin, Vulgar Latin was what was popularly spoken until the popular language finally turned to "proper" localised forms.
Vulgar Latin is then a collective name for a group of derived dialects with local - not necessarily common - characteristics, that don't make a "language", at least in a classical sense.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/vu/Vulgar_Latin.html   (464 words)

  
 Latin at AllExperts
Latin is a member of the family of Italic languages, and its alphabet, the Latin alphabet, is based on the Old Italic alphabet, which is in turn derived from the Greek alphabet.
Latin was first brought to the Italian peninsula in the 9th or 8th century BC by migrants from the north, who settled in the Latium region, specifically around the River Tiber, where the Roman civilization first developed.
Latin translations of modern literature such as Paddington Bear, Winnie the Pooh, Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, Le Petit Prince, Max und Moritz, Walter the Farting Dog, and The Cat in the Hat are intended to bolster interest in the language.
en.allexperts.com /e/l/la/latin.htm   (2099 words)

  
  Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Vulgar Latin (in Latin, sermo vulgaris, "common speech") is a blanket term covering the vernacular dialects and sociolects of the Latin language until those dialects, diverging still further, evolved into the early Romance languages — a distinction usually made around the ninth century.
The Latin brought by Roman soldiers to Gaul, Iberia or Dacia was not identical to the Latin of Cicero, and differed from it in vocabulary, syntax, and grammar.
Latin pirus ("pear tree"), a feminine noun with a masculine-looking ending, became masculine in Italian (il) pero and Romanian păr(ul); in French and Spanish it was replaced by the masculine derivations (le) poirier, (el) peral; and in Portuguese and Catalan by the feminine derivations (a) pereira, (la) perera.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Late_Latin   (6195 words)

  
 Latin language. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Latin was first encountered in ancient times as the language of Latium, the region of central Italy in which Rome is located (see Italic languages).
It is especially from Vulgar Latin, carried by the soldiers and colonists of Rome throughout the Roman Empire, that the modern Romance languages are descended.
Latin survives as the official tongue of Vatican City and as the official language of communication of the Roman Catholic Church.
www.bartleby.com /65/la/Latinlan.html   (576 words)

  
 Latin
Latin is a member of the Italic subfamily of the Indo-European language family that includes other Romance languages.
Latin developed in west-central Italy in an area along the River Tiber known as Latium which became the birthplace of the Roman civilization.
However, Ecclesiastical Latin, also known as Church Latin, remains the official language of Vatican City, and is used in documents of the Roman Catholic Church and in its Latin liturgies.
www.nvtc.gov /lotw/months/january/Latin.html   (1648 words)

  
 LATIN : Encyclopedia Entry
Latin is a member of the family of Italic languages, and its alphabet, the Latin alphabet, is based on the Old Italic alphabet, which is in turn derived from the Greek alphabet.
Latin was first brought to the Italian peninsula in the 9th or 8th century BC by migrants from the north, who settled in the Latium region, specifically around the River Tiber, where the Roman civilization first developed.
Latin was influenced by the Celtic dialects and the non-Indo-European Etruscan language of northern Italy, as well as by the Greek of southern Italy.
bibleocean.com /OmniDefinition/Latin   (2424 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Vulgar Latin Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Vulgar Latin is a blanket term covering the vernacular dialects of the Latin language spoken in the vast provinces of the Roman Empire starting from the second and third century AD, until its direct m...
Vulgar Latin (also Late Latin) is a blanket term covering the vernacular dialects of the Latin language spoken in the vast provinces of the Roman Empire starting from the second and third century AD, until its direct merging with the early romance idioms in the ninth century.
Fourth, "vulgar Latin" is sometimes used to describe the grammatical innovations found in a number of late Latin texts, such as the fourth century Peregrinatio Aetheriae, a nun's account of a journey to Palestine and Mt. Sinai; or the works of St Gregory of Tours.
fav.ipedia.com /vulgar_latin.html   (3780 words)

  
 DNK Amazon Store :: Vulgar Latin
Although Vulgar Latin is not well documented, evidence can be deduced from details of the spelling, grammar, and vocabulary that occur in texts of the later Roman Empire, late antiquity, and the early Middle Ages.
For Herman, Vulgar Latin is the set of innovations and trends which turn up in the Latin-speaking populations little or not at all influenced by school education and literary models.
"Vulgar Latin" (a name that the author doesn't really like, even if he uses it for reasons of its being the best-known name for it) was the normal speech of the Latin speaking world, and as a result, the language that developed into modern French, Spanish, Italian, and the other Romance languages.
www.entertainmentcareers.net /book/ProductDetails.aspx?asin=0271020016   (860 words)

  
 Verbix -- Romance languages: Vulgar Latin   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Vulgar Latin is the spoken form of non-Classical Latin from which originated the Romance group of languages.
Vulgar Latin was primarily the speech of the middle classes in Rome and the Roman provinces; it is derived from Classical Latin but varied across Roman-occupied areas according to the extent of education of the population, communication with Rome, and the original languages of the local populations.
As the Roman Empire disintegrated and the Christian Church became the chief unifying force in southern and western Europe, communication and education declined and regional variation in pronunciation and grammar increased until gradually, after about 600, local forms of Vulgar Latin were no longer mutually intelligible and were thereafter to be considered separate Romance languages.
www.verbix.com /languages/vulgarlatin.shtml   (236 words)

  
 Latin language, alphabet and pronunciation
Latin was the language of the area known as Latium (modern Lazio), and Rome was one of the towns of Latium.
Latin was used throughout the empire as the language of law, administration and increasingly as the language of everyday life.
Modern Latin was used by the Roman Catholic Church until the mid 20th century and is still used to some extent, particularly in the Vatican City, where it is one of the official languages.
www.omniglot.com /writing/latin2.htm   (777 words)

  
 Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin is an early evolution of Latin that appeared in Italy from the 8th to 13th centuries.
Vulgar Latin is more of an umbrella term for the various Latin dialects spoken in the provinces of the former Roman Empire.
Originally Latin distinguished long and short vowels; when this distinction was dropped, along with other phonemic changes, the classic five noun cases and declension system failed to be stable, causing an increased reliance on prepositions and word order, more similar to English.
www.c2.com /cgi/wiki?VulgarLatin   (552 words)

  
 Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin is an early evolution of Latin that appeared in Italy from the 8th to 13th centuries.
Vulgar Latin is more of an umbrella term for the various Latin dialects spoken in the provinces of the former Roman Empire.
Originally Latin distinguished long and short vowels; when this distinction was dropped, along with other phonemic changes, the classic five noun cases and declension system failed to be stable, causing an increased reliance on prepositions and word order, more similar to English.
c2.com /cgi/wiki?VulgarLatin   (552 words)

  
 The Romance Languages - Latin
Another common feature of Vulgar Latin Pronunciation was the absolute loss of final -m and -t, important to all of the daughter languages.
The Latin noun is categorically known as having a masculine, feminine, or neuter gender.
At a glance, the Latin first declension, whose nominative ends in -a and accusative in -am, may lead to the conclusion that the nominative case is a more plausible origin, further evidence proves quite to the contrary.
www.geocities.com /email_theguy/rvulgar.htm   (1391 words)

  
 Vulgar Latin information - Search.com
Vulgar Latin, as in this political engraving at Pompeii, was the language of the ordinary people of the Roman Empire, distinct from the Classical Latin of literature.
Vulgar Latin (in Latin, sermo vulgaris) is a blanket term covering the vernacular dialects of the Latin language spoken mostly in the western provinces of the Roman Empire until those dialects, diverging still further, evolved into the early Romance languages — a distinction usually assigned to about the ninth century.
Since written documentation of Vulgar Latin forms is scarce; these works are valuable to philologists mainly because of the occasional presence of variations or errors in spelling that provide some evidence of spoken usage during the period in which they were written.
www.search.com /reference/Vulgar_Latin   (5322 words)

  
 Vulgar Latin   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Western Romance (or Vulgar Latin) was a variety of the Proto-Romance language, spoken in Northern Italy, Gaul, the Iberian peninsula and Northern Africa.
As the Roman Empire disintegrated and the Christian Church became the chief unifying force in southern and western Europe, communication and education declined and regional variation in pronunciation and grammar increased until gradually, after about 600, local forms of Western Romance were no longer mutually intelligible and were thereafter to be considered separate Romance languages.
As the ancestor of the modern Western Romance languages, Vulgar Latin is also sometimes called Proto-Romance, although Proto-Romance most often refers to hypothetical reconstructions of the language ancestral to the modern Romance languages rather than to the Vulgar Latin that is known from documents.
www.orbilat.com /Languages/Latin_Vulgar/Vulgar_Latin.html   (483 words)

  
 Cultural Notes: Colloquial and Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin is not called that because it is full of dirty words (pity), but because it was used by the vulgus, or people.
The Latin that people learned in school in the Middle Ages and Renaissance was actually Vulgar Latin which had become the fancy, high-status language.
Vulgar Latin, you will be glad to know, was characterized by simple, rational word order, a disregard of unnecessary distinctions, and a desire for greater regularity in word forms.
www.southwestern.edu /~carlg/Latin_Web/culture8.html   (373 words)

  
 Latin - FrathWiki   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Latin was influenced by the Celtic dialects and the non-Indo-European
Vulgar Latin, which significantly differed from Classical Latin in grammar, vocabulary, and eventually pronunciation.
Latin Vulgate The Latin and English of the Old and New Testaments in parallel, along with the Complete Sayings of Jesus in parallel Latin and English.
wiki.frath.net /Latin   (1898 words)

  
 Romance languages
All Romance languages descend from Vulgar Latin, the language of soldiers, settlers, and slaves of the Roman Empire, which was substantially different from the Classical Latin of the Roman literati.
The Latin future tense was replaced by new synthetic future and conditional tenses, based on infinitive + present or imperfect tense of HABERE ("to have"), fused to form new inflections.
Vulgar Latin developed different methods of signifying assent: hoc ille ("that (is) it") and hoc ("that"), which became the langues d'oïl and langue d'oc (or Occitan language), respectively.
www.languageexchanges.com /romance_languages.html   (5848 words)

  
 spanish language history & dialects in spain -- castilian andalusian
The history of the Spanish language and the origin of the dialects of Spain begin with the linguistic evolution of Vulgar Latin.
When the classical Latin of the educated Roman classes mixed with the pre-Roman languages of the Iberians, Celts, and Carthaginians, a language called Vulgar Latin appeared.
Arabic and a related dialect called Mozarabic came to be widely spoken in Islamic Spain except in a few remote Christian kingdoms in the North such as Asturias, where Vulgar Latin survived.
www.alsintl.com /languages/spanish.htm   (841 words)

  
 József Herman: Vulgar Latin
Hardback: $55.00 SH Paperback: $22.00 SH Vulgar Latin refers to those features of Latin language that were not recommended by the classical grammarians but existed nonetheless.
Although Vulgar Latin is not well documented, evidence can be deduced from details of the spelling, grammar, and vocabulary that occur in texts of the later Roman Empire, late antiquity, and the early Middle Ages.
The English translation by Roger Wright accurately portrays Vulgar Latin as a complicated field of study, where little is known with absolute certainty, but a great deal can be worked out with considerable probability through careful critical analysis of the data.
www.psupress.org /books/titles/0-271-02000-8.html   (277 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Vulgar Latin: Books: Jozsef Herman,Roger Wright   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-30)
Vulgar Latin refers to those features of Latin language that were not recommended by the classical grammarians but existed nonetheless.
For Herman, Vulgar Latin is the set of innovations and trends which turn up in the Latin-speaking populations little or not at all influenced by school education and literary models.
"Vulgar Latin" (a name that the author doesn't really like, even if he uses it for reasons of its being the best-known name for it) was the normal speech of the Latin speaking world, and as a result, the language that developed into modern French, Spanish, Italian, and the other Romance languages.
www.amazon.com /Vulgar-Latin-Jozsef-Herman/dp/0271020016   (1616 words)

  
 Romanic Developments from Latin
The Latin which we have in our Classical texts is a formal, literary dialect, used by authors from the Augustan period on, and codified by the Roman school-system in its teaching under the Empire.
Vulgar Latin had split into early forms of the various Romanic tongues, as is evidenced by the Strassburg Oaths, swearing allegiance to Charlemagne, in what is recognizable as clearly distinct proto-languages.
A knowledge of Latin is indispensable for such work on the graduate level, coupled with knowledge of two or more of the Latin-based tongues.
community.middlebury.edu /~harris/LatinBackground/RomanicDev.html   (385 words)

  
 vulgar - Definitions from Dictionary.com
Vulgar is an example of pejoration, the process by which a word develops negative meanings over time.
What is common may be seen as debased, and in the 17th century we begin to find instances of vulgar that make explicit what had been implicit.
Vulgar then came to mean "deficient in taste, delicacy, or refinement." From such uses vulgar has continued to go downhill, and at present "crudely indecent" is among the commonest senses of the word.
dictionary.reference.com /browse/vulgar   (526 words)

  
 Seton's Message Boards :: View topic - Vulgar Latin
St. Jerome translated the Bible into vulgar Latin (hence we call his translation the Vulgate), and this is probably the single greatest source for our knowledge of how most people spoke Latin in antiquity (or at least late antiquity).
It is not a separate language by any means, but it uses fairly simple grammatical constructions and a fairly limited vocabulary, and many of the grammatical constructions used in vulgar Latin would have been considered stylistically atrocious by the literati.
The traditional progression is: made-up Latin the first year, Caesar the second year, Cicero in the third year, and Vergil in the fourth.
www.setonhome.org /phpbb2/viewtopic.php?t=4248&start=0&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=   (361 words)

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