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Topic: Waldensians


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In the News (Thu 18 Apr 19)

  
  Waldensians - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
As early as the twelfth century, the Waldensians were granted refuge in Piedmont by the Count of Savoy.
A crusade against Waldensians in the Dauphiné region of France was declared in 1487, but Papal representatives continued to devastate towns and villages into the mid 16th century as the Waldensians became absorbed into the wider Protestant Reformation.
By the 1920s the Waldensian churches and missions merged into the Presbyterian Church due to the cultural assimilation of the second and third generations.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Waldensians   (2139 words)

  
 Waldensians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Waldensians were followers of Peter Waldo (or Valdes or Vaudes); they called themselves the Poor men of Lyon, the Poor of Lombardy, or the Poor.
A final crusade against the Waldensians was declared in 1487, but Papal representatives continued to devastate towns and villages into the mid 16th century as the Waldensians became absorbed into the wider Protestant Reformation.
The Italian Waldensian church joined the Methodists to form the Chiesa evangelica valdese (Waldensian Church), which is a member of the World Council of Churches.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Waldensians.html   (759 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Waldensians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Events Third Council of the Lateran condemned Waldensians and Cathars as heretics, institutes a reformation of clerical life, and creates the first ghettos for Jews Afonso I is recognized as the true King of Portugal by Portugal the protection of the Catholic Church against the Castillian monarchy Philip II is...
William Farel William Farel (Guillaume Farel, 1489-1565) was a French evangelist, and a founder of the Reformed Church in the cantons of Neuchâtel, Berne and Geneva, and the Canton of Vaud Switzerland.
Waldensians were a religious group that lived in the Piedmont valleys of modern day Italy until most of them were expelled at the end of the 1600s.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Waldensians   (5415 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Waldensian   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Later Protestant groups such as Baptists and Anabaptists sometimes point to the Waldensians as an example of earlier Christians who held beliefs similar to their own, including the belief in Believers Baptism and opposition to pedobaptism.
By the 1920s the Waldensian churches and missions merged into the Presbyterian Church (USA) due the cultural assimilation of the second and third generations.
The first Waldensian settlers from Italy arrived in South America in 1856 and today the Waldensian Church of the Rio de La Plata has approximately 40 congregations and 15,000 members shared between Uruguay and Argentina.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Waldensian   (1401 words)

  
 Waldensian Church briefly
While the movement was completely eradicated in southern France, the Waldensians of the valleys were able to secure a treaty from the Pedmontese government in 1690 and there followed a period of relative peace and security.
Waldensian history is related to one of the most lively and most fruitful periods of European history - the XII century.
The Waldensian movement, in fact, emerged from the immense wave of religious restlessness which accompanied the communal civilization at its rise.
www.giveshare.org /churchhistory/waldenses/notesonwaldensianchurch.html   (1388 words)

  
 The Waldensians | The Anabaptist Network
Waldensians survived by retreating into quietism or into the mountains, where they formed communities that were too remote to bother the authorities.
By the start of the fifteenth century, Waldensians in France and Italy seemed to be in terminal decline, a beleaguered minority of Alpine peasants in remote valleys and small communities scattered throughout other parts of France.
In the fifteenth century, German-speaking Waldensians were also an underground movement, surviving through a combination of outward conformity and quiet but tenacious transmission of beliefs within families to subsequent generations.
www.anabaptistnetwork.com /waldensians   (1988 words)

  
 Chiesa evangelica valdese - Why Waldensians?
Due to a number of favourable circumstances the Waldensians were able to obtain the recognition of their faith in a precise area of the Cottian Alps.
For the whole of the 18th century the Waldensians were confined to their territory in the Waldensian Valleys, more or less as the Jews were to their ghetto, objects of a discriminating leglislation which treated them as second class citizens.
The Waldensians actively committed themselves to defend these principles, from the Risorgimento (the movement for national unity after 1848) to the Resistence, convinced of their importance for the political and social renewal of the country.
www.chiesavaldese.org /english/pages/history/valdo.html   (890 words)

  
 Waldensians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Waldensians were followers of Peter Waldo (or Valdes or Vaudes); they called the Poor men of Lyon the Poor of Lombardy or the Poor.
A final crusade against the Waldensians was in 1487 but Papal representatives continued to devastate and villages into the mid 16th century as the Waldensians became absorbed into wider Protestant Reformation.
Later Protestant groups such as Baptists and Anabaptists sometimes point to the Waldensians as example of earlier Christians who held beliefs to their own including the belief in Believers Baptism and opposition to pedobaptism.
www.freeglossary.com /Waldensians   (761 words)

  
 The Age of Chivalry - Waldensians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Waldensians believed in a pure form of Christianity but they were denied authorisation to preach in the vernacular to the masses and their continued defiance of Catholic bans led to their excommunication and final persecution by the Inquisition.
Finally in the 1180s Pope Lucius III excommunicated the Waldensians because of their continued defiance and as a result many were persecuted by the Inquisition in the 1200s.
The Waldensians continued to be victims of the Inquisition right into the 15th century and some converted back to Catholicism.
www.taoc.co.uk /content/view/83/44   (487 words)

  
 The Waldensians - Poor Men of Lyons
At a conference held at Cianforan in the Piedmont Alps in 1532, the Waldensian barbes, or "uncles" as their ministers were now called, agreed to join the budding Swiss Protestant movement.
The Waldensians were more influenced by the Reformation than acting as an influence upon it; however, they are remarkable in that they held a primitive form of Protestantism centuries before the movement actually began.
In a world darkened by the corruption and indulgence of the Catholic church, Peter Waldo and his followers briefly shone as a testimony to the sincerity, simplicity, and commitment to the Word of God which characterized the early church, and challenged many a complacent churchman to reexamine his life and his faith.
www.ordotempli.org /the_waldensians_-_poor_men_of_lyons.htm   (1637 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Waldenses
The present Waldensian Church may be regarded as a Protestant sect of the Calvinistic type.
The most conspicuous centre of Waldensian activity in France during the later middle ages was Dauphiné; and the western slope of the Cottian Alps.
Not only were its teachings universally adopted, but numerous Waldensian communities were merged in the Protestant churches, the Italian congregations alone retaining an independent existence and the original name.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/15527b.htm   (2842 words)

  
 Waldensians
With the words of this sonnet the blind poet John Milton commemorated the terrible massacre of the Waldensians by the Romish Church.
The Waldensians saw the error of this and insisted that the Lord had added the sacraments to the preaching and that therefore, God saved His people by the preaching of the Word.
On the other side of the coin, one man suspected of Waldensian error proved at his trial that he was not and could not be a Waldensian, but had to be a good Catholic, because he lied, swore and drank.
www.prca.org /books/portraits/walden.htm   (1556 words)

  
 CALVINISM: 11
This massacre of Waldensians by Roman Catholics in the Piedmont region of Italy is one of the most horrendous events in Church History.
Its second article expresses the Waldensians' belief in the Calvinist doctrine of Unconditional Election: "All those that have been, and shall be saved, have been elected of God, before the Foundation of the World" (p.40).
Its twenty-third article expresses the Waldensians' belief in the Calvinist doctrine of the Preservation and Perseverance of the Saints: "That those, who are already in the possession of eternal life by their faith and good works, ought to be considered as Saints, and as glorified persons...." (p.66).
www.angelfire.com /tx3/allofgrace/baptisthistory.htm   (1990 words)

  
 Chiesa evangelica valdese - Guided visit
A Waldensian movement was born, known as "the poor ones", from Lyons in France and Lombardy in Italy, which spread out across Europe while gathering popular support.
In spite of the many episodes of persecution, the Waldensians resisted fiercely, trusting in the help of the Lord, and were able to achieve recognition of their existence in a well-defined area of the Cozie Alps, today known as the "Waldensian Valleys".
Throughout the 18th Century the Waldensians were shunned and subject to discriminatory legislation which made them second-class citizens confined to their own area much like the Jews in their ghettos.
www.chiesavaldese.org /english/pages/places/page2.html   (419 words)

  
 Waldensian
The Waldensians were followers of Peter Waldo (or Valdesor Vaudes); they called themselves the Poor men of Lyon, the Poor of Lombardy, or the Poor.
The Waldensians did not.However, both the Waldensians and Albigensians were folk movements that involved public preaching.
A final crusade against the Waldensians was declared in 1487, but Papal representativescontinued to devastate towns and villages into the mid 16th century as theWaldensians became absorbed into the wider ProtestantReformation.
www.therfcc.org /waldensian-121595.html   (692 words)

  
 The Square Table
A small fraction of the 25,000 Waldensians came to N.C. in 1893, 29 in May and another 178 in November, founding the town of Valdese (Italian for "Waldensian").
In 1974, the Waldensian Museum was opened as part of the Waldensian Presbyterian Church on the corner of Rodoret Street and St. Germain Avenue.
The Waldensian Festival (commemorating the 1689 return to their homeland) is held the second Saturday in August.
www.thesquaretable.com /Summer2004/valdese.htm   (1176 words)

  
 Hunting Heretics
The Waldensians were orthodox in their beliefs, but they were outside of the organizational structure of the Roman Catholic Church.
The humility and voluntary poverty of the Waldensians were a striking contrast to the pride and luxury of the hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church.
The magnitude of their persecution is shown by the fact that in one year, in Italy alone, nine thousand Waldensians were killed and another twelve thousand were put into prison, where most of them died.
www.catholicconcerns.com /Heretics.html   (2969 words)

  
 Waldensian Church briefly   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Waldensian Church, today a member of both the Ecumenical Council of Geneva and the World Alliance of Reform Churches, traces its origins to the Waldensian movement founded by Peter Valdo (Pietro Valdo) of Lyon (1140-1217).
The Protestant Reformation, which the Waldensians joined without hesitation, made possible a period of reorganization within the movement culminating in the Synod of Chanforan (1532) during which a Confession of Faith of a Protestant stamp was adopted, along with a church structure in line with those of the Reformed Churches of the time.
Emenuele Filiberto of Piedmont, unable to destroy the communities in the Waldensians valleys because of the tenacious resistence of their inhabitants, was forced to accept the "Treaty of Cavour" which guaranteed freedom of religion within the valleys but blocked any possibility of expansion outside those valleys.
www.arpnet.it /valdese/church.htm   (685 words)

  
 Lecture 3: The Medieval World View (2)
The movement, known as the "Poor Men of Lyons" or simply, the Waldensians, had as its main activity the reading of the Bible in the vernacular and a life in strict imitation of Christ.
The Waldensians were opposed to relics and the cult of Saints.
For the Waldensians, a vernacular Bible, vernacular prayer and songs, a communal life, schools of their own and well-organized missionary work and propaganda brought about a rapid spread of their ideas in Italy, southern France and Spain.
www.historyguide.org /intellect/lecture3a.html   (4104 words)

  
 The Waldensian Movement From Waldo to the Reformation VI   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Waldensian Movement From Waldo to the Reformation VI By Dennis McCallum
A young Waldensian whose gifts and resolve marked him for service in the community would be apprenticed to an experienced barba for a period of several years.
The Waldensian Church still exists today in several locations.79 Unfortunately, the fusion with the Reformed Church has not resulted in the rapid ferment of outreach that once characterized the movement.
www.xenos.org /essays/waldo7.htm   (965 words)

  
 waldensians1   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
'Waldensianism was the most geographically widespread and the longest lived of all medieval popular heresies; most likely it was also the largest in terms of aggregate numbers of believers'.
The Waldensian movement began in western Europe during the late 12th century when Peter Valdez (also spelled Waldes), a merchant and wandering preacher, had an epiphany and resolved to dedicate himself to the aposlte life-style; that of poverty and preaching.
Soon after being deemed heretics, the Waldensians became heretical in their beliefs, primarily over the church's association with wealth, divinity, and power; they rejected the authority of priests, as divine communicators with God, while chosing to base their own on individual merit.
www2.kenyon.edu /projects/margin/walt1.htm   (656 words)

  
 The Waldensians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
They held to the priesthood of all believers, denied the Catholic view of apostolic succession, rejected any form of violence military or legal, and refused to take oaths.Despite their excommunication, however, they did not denounce the Catholic Church as a whole, but objected primarily to the compromise of the church with the world.
At present the Waldensian denomination, though small and little known, still exists.35,000 of the 3,400,000 Protestants in Italy are Waldensians.A recent union with the Italian Methodist Church, creating the Evangelical Waldensian Church, has strengthened its ranks.
A Waldensian population is still found in Uruguay and Argentina.However, the movement has largely been absorbed into other denominations, and a strong ecumenical trend within the modern Waldensian church appears to guarantee their eventual disappearance.
rja.mirrordance.net /docs/waldensians.html   (999 words)

  
 The Waldensian Church of Northern Italy
The earliest date of a persecuting edict having been launched against the Waldensians in their own valleys was 1198, when the Emperor Otho IV., in his visit to Rome to be crowned by the Pope, issued a decree empowering the Bishop of Turin to suppress and excommunicate them.
In the course of the Middle Ages the Waldensians had been martyred in all the countries whither they went; but in their native valleys the Kings of France and the Dukes of Savoy had seldom authorized persecution.
Two Waldensians, Campo and Desiderio, were dispatched for this purpose, and they thus addressed the Legate—"Do not condemn us without hearing us; we are Christians and faithful subjects; we are prepared to prove in public or in private that our doctrines are conformable to the Word of God.
www.baptistpillar.com /bd0458.htm   (1321 words)

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