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Topic: Western Schism


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In the News (Thu 20 Jun 19)

  
  the great schism
The primary causes of the the Great Schism were disputes over papal authority—the Pope claimed he held authority over the four Eastern patriarchs, while the patriarchs claimed that the Pope was merely a first among equals—and over the insertion of the filioque clause into the Nicene Creed.
The dominant language of the West was Latin, whilst that of the East became Greek.
The Great Schism was not the first schism between East and West; there had, in fact, been over two centuries of schism during the first millenium of the Church.
www.crusades-history.com /The-Great-Schism.aspx   (1213 words)

  
  Western Schism
This schism of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries differs in all points from the Eastern Schism.
The Western Schism was only a temporary misunderstanding, even though it compelled the Church for forty years to seek its true head; it was fed by politics and passions, and was terminated by the assembling of the councils of Pisa and Constance.
Schism and heresy as sins and vices, he adds in 1412, can only result from stubborn opposition either to the unity of the Church, or to an article of faith.
www.catholicity.com /encyclopedia/w/western_schism.html   (3201 words)

  
 Western Schism - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Western Schism or Papal Schism was a split within the Catholic Church in 1378.
The schism in the Western church resulted from the untimely return of the Papacy from Avignon to Rome by Pope Gregory XI in 1378, ending the Avignon Papacy.
The Great Schism of the Western Church occupied the energies of Jean Gerson, one of the great theologians of the age.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Great_Western_Schism   (487 words)

  
 Schism, Great - HighBeam Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Theologians of the Univ. of Paris, led by Pierre d' Ailly and John Gerson, were anxious to end the schism, and they developed the theory that popes are subject to general councils.
Martin V was elected, and the schism was at an end.
The main effects of the schism were to delay needed reforms in the church and to give rise to the conciliar theory, which was revived at the Council of Basel (see Basel, Council of).
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-schism-g1.html   (587 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Western Schism
This schism of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries differs in all points from the Eastern Schism.
Western Schism was only a temporary misunderstanding, even though it compelled the Church for forty years to seek its true head; it was fed by politics and
Western Schism, it is no less true, no less real that the apostolicity exists objectively in the true pope.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/13539a.htm   (2971 words)

  
 Circle of Prayer - Schism & Division
Schism is the formal separation from the unity of the Church.
Schism (separation from the Church) differs from Heresy (denial of a truth of faith).
The western schism was a temporary conflict within the Church during the 14th and 15th centuries rather than a true schism and is also also known as The Great Schism.
www.circleofprayer.com /schism.html   (1816 words)

  
 CalendarHome.com - - Calendar Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Many western Christians were troubled by what they saw as false doctrines and malpractices within the Church, particularly involving the teaching and sale of indulgences.
There would finally be a schism in the reform movement due to Luther's belief in consubstantiation—the real (as opposed to symbolic) presence of Christ at the Eucharist.
His original intention was not schism, but with the Reichstag of Augsburg (1530) and its rejection of the Lutheran "Augsburg Confession," a separate Lutheran church finally emerged.
encyclopedia.calendarhome.com /cgi-bin/encyclopedia.pl?p=Reformation   (4566 words)

  
 The Question of Assistance at the Mass of a Priest Who Professes Communion With John Paul II as Pope
Hence the sin of schism is, properly speaking, a special sin, for the reason that the schismatic intends to sever himself from that unity which is the effect of charity: because charity unites not only one person to another with the bond of spiritual love, but also the whole Church in unity of spirit.
Schism is the crime of refusal of submission to the Roman Pontiff or the refusal of communion with those who are subject to him.
Material schism is complete but innocent, in that the person concerned is not subject to the pope, and knows it, but has not realised that he is under a grave obligation to be subject to the Roman Pontiff.
www.sedevacantist.org /una_cum.html   (8286 words)

  
 Organizational Model of the Christian Church: Western Catholicism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Western Church is the branch of the Catholic Church that is descended by the Patriarchy of Rome.
Most Western Europeans were reduced to peasantry as the feudal system took hold of the economy and society.
Western religious philosophy of the Middle Ages can best be summed by the statement of St. Augustine of Hippo in the 4th century: "Faith is to believe was you do not see; the reward of this faith is to see what you believe."
www.southbear.com /Denominations/Western_Rite.html   (1848 words)

  
 HISTORY OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH*
Thus the schism was completed, and Western Europe had the spectacle of two popes elected by the same college of cardinals without a dissenting voice, and each making full claims to the prerogative of the supreme pontiff of the Christian world.
As a means of healing the schism, Clement proposed a general council, promising, in case it decided in his favor, to recognize Urban as leading cardinal.
The nations of Western Europe were weary of the open and flagitious traffic in benefices and other ecclesiastical privileges, the fulminations of one pope against the other, and the division of sees and parishes between rival claimants.
www.ccel.org /s/schaff/history/6_ch02.htm   (18129 words)

  
 The "Western Rite": Is It Right for the Orthodox?
Furthermore - so we are told - these "western rite" communities represent a return to the Orthodox Church of the authentic, pre-schismatic Orthodox worship of the ancient Christian west and therefore enhances her catholicity and appeal to all people.
He is not the "father" of this "western rite" in even remotely the same way that St. John Chrysostom or St. Basil the Great are the fathers of the Liturgies which bear their names.
At the same time, Orthodox who do not accept the "western rite" are not simply "impeding progress." Rather, they are trying to safeguard the Church from a policy that is neither in the best interests of her established members, nor of her converts.
www.orthodoxresearchinstitute.org /articles/liturgics/johnson_western_rite.htm   (3472 words)

  
 Great Schism - Theopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The the Great Schism, also known as the East-West Schism, was the event that divided "Chalcedonian" Christianity into Western (Roman) Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy.
Though normally dated to 1054, when Pope Leo IX and Patriarch Michael I excommunicated each other, the East-West Schism was actually the result of an extended period of estrangement between the two bodies of churches.
The Great Schism was not the first schism between East and West; there had, in fact, been over two centuries of schism during the first millennium of the Church.
www.theopedia.com /Great_schism   (1307 words)

  
 Orthodox-Catholic Church of America -- History
While the eleventh century schism which alienated the Western segment of the church from its eastern segment was indeed a great tragedy, surely a parallel tragedy is how readily later Eastern elders seized on outward circumstance to narrow churchly identity and expression to conform to their Byzantine pattern.
The resuscitation of a long-dormant Western Orthodox Catholic consciousness and its reintegration with that wholeness and balance which is the Orthodox Catholic Tradition was not too different in development from the majority of "Eastern" Orthodox ministries eventually established in the American Mission Territory, as the United States was in the nineteenth century.
Father Vilatte pointed out that it was the vision of the Western Orthodox faithful, with which he concurred, to be structured as diocesan entity, organically united with their own Bishop, as an indigenous and self-sufficient local church, not in opposition to, but organically in fellowship with the Russo-American Bishopric.
www.orthodoxcatholicchurch.org /history.html   (7955 words)

  
 chaucer2
One question this all too brief analysis of the Schism raises, is why Chaucer chose to associate his Pardoner with the institution of St. Mary's of Rouncivale at Charing Cross, London, as opposed to any number of other similar institutions, or causes, available to him at the end of the fourteenth century.
At the same time, since the principals involved in the dispute were popes, and hence held the highest human authority in and over the church, there was no one available in the hierarchy who could act as judge and arbitrator over the claims of legitimacy made by the two sides.
The church, in general, was unable or unwilling to end the Schism and essentially abdicated its prerogatives of power to determine its own destiny by granting that authority to secular institutions.
www.geocities.com /Athens/Delphi/9976/chaucer2.html   (4104 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Great Schism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Most commonly, "Great Schism" refers to the "great East-West schism", the split between the Eastern and Western churches in the eleventh century; the second schism, the "schism of the west" in the fourteenth century, refers to a time when three (claimant) popes were elected at the same time.
With movement of the emperor and political authority from Rome to Constantinople, a division was caused in the religious climate of the empire.
The second, and temporary, schism resulted from the return of the Papacy from Avignon to Rome by Pope Gregory XI in 1378, ending the Avignon Papacy.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Great_Schism   (508 words)

  
 The Great Schism: The Estrangement of Eastern and Western Christendom
The schism was conditioned by cultural, political, and economic factors; yet its fundamental cause was not secular but theological.
Long before there was an open and formal schism between east and west, the two sides had become strangers to one another; and in attempting to understand how and why the communion of Christendom was broken, we must start with this fact of increasing estrangement.
The western Church gradually became centralized to a degree unknown anywhere in the four Patriarchates of the east (except possibly in Egypt).
www.orthodoxinfo.com /general/greatschism.aspx   (6265 words)

  
 Great Schism
The term Great Schism is used to refer to two major events in the history of Christianity: the division between the Eastern (Orthodox) and Western (Roman) churches, and the period (1378 - 1417) during which the Western church had first two, and later three, lines of popes.
The schism between the Eastern and Western churches is traditionally dated to 1054, although the precise point at which the split became a fixed and lasting reality is difficult to determine.
To that "fold" the Western Church is called to join by abolishing the "innovations" and the pretext of supremacy of the Pope at the expense of the "fold".
mb-soft.com /believe/txc/gschism.htm   (6237 words)

  
 Pocket Church History for Orthodox Christians - 2   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In Western and Central Europe, the sovereignty of the Roman church was undisputed, and its political clout and property holdings grew simply immense; this is referred to as the Golden Age of the Papacy.
This divisive scenario is called the Western Schism (not to be confused with the "Great Schism" of 1054) and it was terminated when the influential "ecumenical" council of Constance, a purely Western council, elected a fourth man, Martin V, as Pope.
Western trends in methodology and terminology affected the Church’s manner of teaching, often to Orthodoxy’s detriment, and throughout this era there was no Western liturgy in Orthodoxy, nor any beachhead of Orthodox faithful in Western lands.
www.odox.net /Orthodox-History2.htm   (9816 words)

  
 Three Popes during the Great Western Schism (1378-1415)?
The claim is sometimes used against the Catholic Church that she had two or three Popes at the same time during the Great Western Schism (1378-1415).
The political events leading up to the schism will not be dealt with, apart from the election of the first antipope, Robert of Geneva, who took the name Clement VII.
The schism was ended with the election of Pope Martin V. All other supposed popes from this period were in fact antipopes.
www.angelfire.com /ms/seanie/papacy/schism.html   (538 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Western Schism Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Western Schism or Papal Schism was a split within the Catholic Church in 1378.
The schism in the Western church resulted from the return of the Papacy from Avignon to Rome by Pope Gregory XI in 1378, ending the Avignon Papacy.
The Great Schism of the Western Church occupied the energies of Jean Gerson, one of the great theologians of the age.
www.ipedia.com /western_schism.html   (501 words)

  
 HTC: The "Western Rite": Is It Right for the Orthodox?
Although the "western rite" of the Antiochian Archdiocese continued for years as a mere handful of par ishes, it has recently received a "shot in the arm" with the reception into Orthodoxy of a number of disaffected Episcopalians - sometimes including entire parishes.
Furthermore - so we are told - these "western rite" communiti es represent a return to the Orthodox Church of the authentic, pre-schismatic Orthodox worship of the ancient Christian west and therefore enhances her catholicity and appeal to all people.
Not only will the structure of the worship in a "western rite" parish be unfamiliar, but the very method of receiving the sacrament of communion will be di fferent, so that even though technically in communion, visitors from established Orthodox traditions will be discouraged from receiving the holy mysteries.
www.holy-trinity.org /modern/western-rite/johnson.html   (3472 words)

  
 Filioque - OrthodoxWiki
While the theology of Aquinas and other Scholastics was dominant in the Western Middle Ages, for all its apparent clarity and brilliance, it remains theology, not official Roman Catholic Church teaching.
The Great Western Schism concluded with yet a third individual claiming to be Pope and the Council of Constance.
Since the general consensus of the Fathers was held to be reliable, as a witness to common faith, the Western usage was held not to be a heresy and not a barrier to restoration of full communion.
orthodoxwiki.org /Filioque   (3470 words)

  
 Christianity, ROMAN CATHOLICISM
The name of the church is derived from its base in Rome and from a Greek term meaning "universal." The word Catholic refers to the wholeness of the church, and for many centuries the Roman church claimed to be the only true Christian denomination.
Following this episode was the Great Western Schism (1378-1418), during which opposing popes tried to rule.
The major cause of the schism was the move of the papacy to Avignon, France, early in the 14th century.
history-world.org /roman_catholicism.htm   (2936 words)

  
 Ecumenical Councils and the rise and fall of the Church of Rome (Roman Catholic Church) - abelard
The subsequent history of Monophysite doctrine in the Eastern Church is the history of national and independent churches (e.g., the Syrian Jacobites) that, either for reasons of reverence for some religious leader or as a reaction against the dominance of the Byzantine or Roman churches, retained a separate existence.
The Western Church, devoted as it was to the acts of the Council of Chalcedon, could not bring itself to accept the decrees, even though the Pope had accepted them.
Western pleas for reunion (on Western terms), like those at the Council of Lyon (1274) or the Council of Basle-Ferrara-Florence-Lausanne (1439), were rejected by the Byzantines.
www.abelard.org /councils/councils.htm   (12581 words)

  
 Western Orthodox Kalendar   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
It is, however, based directly on the Kalendars officially approved by the Western Rite Vicariate.
Western Rite Dean of the Central and Mountain States.
Such additions are considered to be in line with the spirit of pre-Schism Western Christianity.
www.westernorthodox.com /kalendar   (118 words)

  
 Great Schism - OrthodoxWiki
The Great Schism is the historic sundering of Eucharistic relations between the See of Rome (now the Roman Catholic Church) and the other Christian patriarchates.
In Western circles, the term Great Schism is often used to refer to the 14th century schism involving the Avignon Papacy (an event also sometimes called the "Babylonian Captivity").
The Great Schism was a gradual estrangement to which no specific date can be assigned although it has been conventionally dated to the year 1054.
www.orthodoxwiki.org /Great_Schism   (654 words)

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