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Topic: Westminster Hall


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In the News (Thu 27 Nov 14)

  
  Palace of Westminster - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Palace of Westminster was the monarch's principal residence in the late Mediaeval period.
Westminster Hall, which was built in the 11th century and survived the fire of 1834, was incorporated in Barry's design.
Westminster Hall is one of the largest halls in Europe with an unsupported roof; it measures 21 by 73 m (68 by 240 ft).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Palace_of_Westminster   (4279 words)

  
 Palace of Westminster - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Palace of Westminster, known also as the Houses of Parliament, is the location at which the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons) conduct their sittings.
The Palace of Westminster was the monarch's principal residence in the late Medieval period.
Westminster Hall is one of the largest European halls with an unsupported roof; it measures 73.2 m by 20.7 m (240 ft by 68 ft).
www.newlenox.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Palace_of_Westminster   (4161 words)

  
 Westminster Central Hall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Westminster Central Hall, Westminster Methodist Hall or Methodist Central Hall Westminster is a building in London, England.
Methodist Central Hall was erected to mark the centenary of John Wesley's death.
Central Hall was funded by 1,025,000 contributors between 1898 and 1908 to the 'Wesleyan Methodist Twentieth Century Fund' (or the 'Million Guinea Fund' as it became more commonly known), whose aim was to raise one million guineas from one million Methodists.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Westminster_Central_Hall   (451 words)

  
 Palace of Westminster
The Palace of Westminster was the principal residence of the kings of England from the middle of the 11th century until 1512.
This fire destroyed almost all of the Palace except Westminster Hall, the crypt of St Stephen's Chapel, the adjacent cloisters and the Jewel Tower.
To the east and south of the Hall lay the domestic apartments of the mediaeval Palace, and later, the royal chapel of St Stephen.
www.parliament.uk /parliament/guide/palace.htm   (1318 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Westminster Hall   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Palace of Westminster, on the banks of the River Thames in Westminster, London, is the home of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, which form the Parliament of the United Kingdom.
The Palace of Westminster occupies a site of 32,400 m² (8 acres) on the west bank of the Thames as it runs from south to north on one of its serpentine diversions through the city.
Westminster Hall, erected 1097-1099 by William Rufus, is the oldest part of the Palace of Westminster.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Westminster-Hall   (1136 words)

  
 BBC - History - The Great Hall   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Westminster Hall has long occupied a unique place in the national consciousness as a setting for state occasions.
It is by far the largest great hall ever constructed in England and remains - along with the principal London railway stations - one of the largest public interiors in the capital.
The hall was built by William Rufus between 1097-99 as part of the royal Palace of Westminster.
www.bbc.co.uk /history/society_culture/architecture/great_hall_02.shtml   (318 words)

  
 Memorial sites > HM Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother > Background > Westminster Hall
Westminster Hall is the oldest surviving building of the ancient Palace of Westminster which, from the reign of Edward the Confessor (1042-66) to the early years of Henry VIII (1509-47), was the principal residence of the Kings of England.
The Hall has continued to be used for such solemn ceremonial occasions as the Lying-in-State of members of the Royal family, including King George VI who lay in state for three days and four nights in 1952, and two great commoners, William Gladstone and Winston Churchill.
Addresses were presented in 1965 to mark the seventh centenary of the summoning, to the Hall, of the Parliament of Simon de Montfort, and in 1977 and 2002 to celebrate the 25th and 50th anniversaries of the accession to the Throne of Her Majesty The Queen.
www.royal.gov.uk /output/Page1019.asp   (594 words)

  
 Palace of Westminster -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The site of the Palace of Westminster was of strategic importance during the (The period of history between classical antiquity and the Italian Renaissance) Middle Ages, as it found itself on the banks of the River Thames.
Only Westminster Hall, the Jewel Tower, the crypt of St Stephen's Chapel, and the (A courtyard with covered walks (as in religious institutions)) cloisters survived the conflagration.
One of the most famous historical attempts to breach the security of the Palace of Westminster was the (A conspiracy in 1605 in England to blow up James I and the Houses of Parliament to avenge the persecution of Catholics in England; led by Guy Fawkes) Gunpowder Plot of 1605.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/p/pa/palace_of_westminster.htm   (4466 words)

  
 House of Commons - Modernisation of the House of Commons - Fourth Report
Attendance is not a relevant criterion for the short debates in Westminster Hall, since participation is restricted to the Member initiating the debate and the Minister replying, but on a number of occasions attendance has reached double figures.
Westminster Hall is currently a more popular venue for short debates than the Chamber, where the adjournment debate is often at an unpredictable time and sometimes very late at night.
Overwhelmingly it is accepted that Westminster Hall has not detracted from the primacy of the Chamber: the House has had no difficulty in keeping the business in the main Chamber going on Thursday afternoons when the parallel Chamber has also been in operation.
www.publications.parliament.uk /pa/cm199900/cmselect/cmmodern/906/90603.htm   (3005 words)

  
 Intercollegiate Who's Who   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Ault is a member of the University of Missouri Hall of Fame, the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame and the National High School Sports Hall of Fame.
A Hall of Fame coach at the University of Missouri.
Coached the Westminster College Blue Jay baseball team for 31 years, the longest tenure of all baseball coaches in the 100-plus year history of the program.
www.westminster-mo.edu /Athletics/Department_Info/Whos_Who.asp   (1393 words)

  
 City of Westminster, CO - Official Website   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Westminster volunteers will have a chance to assist senior residents with yard work and minor home repairs.
The Nov. 1 election is quickly approaching, and Westminster voters will be deciding important races for city council and mayor, as well as two sets of ballot issues, one local and one statewide.
The Westminster Fire Department is sponsoring a coloring contest for third-graders during the month of October.
www.ci.westminster.co.us   (379 words)

  
 Westminster Police
Police also were using the basement area of City Hall where one storage room was utilized as a detaining cell for prisoners and a "property room" was established for evidence collection.
In November 1969 the Westminster Police force was honored and recognized as the first Department on the east coast of the United States to wear the National flag emblem on their uniforms.
He joined the Westminster Police Department on June 26, 1967, and was appointed chief July 1, 1976, a position he held until the time of his death.
www.westgov.com /Police/dept_history/index2.htm   (1755 words)

  
 BBC NEWS | UK | Westminster Hall: Cradle of Parliament
Westminster Hall, where the Queen Mother will lie in state, has enjoyed a 900-year history filled with political intrigue and drama.
Lying in the heart of London, Westminster is the spiritual, judicial and political centre of the nation.
The tradition of using the hall for lying-in-state is a relatively recent one which began with the former Liberal prime minister, William Gladstone, in 1898, followed by King Edward VII in 1910.
news.bbc.co.uk /hi/english/uk/newsid_19090000/1909224.stm   (587 words)

  
 BBC - History Trail - Church and State
When it was built by William Rufus, it was the largest hall in Europe and helped establish Westminster as the ceremonial centre of the country.
The hall was lucky to escape destruction by both the 1834 fire and World War II bombing with its vast stained glass arched window dominating one end still intact (c).
Monarchs, consorts and distinguished statesmen are traditionally laid in state in Westminster Hall, the last two being Sir Winston Churchill in 1965, and Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother in 2002.
www.bbc.co.uk /history/lj/churchlj/parl_11.shtml   (288 words)

  
 Westminster Hall... A Christian Education Adult Ministry
Westminster Hall is a resource initiative to advance adult (college-age through seniors) Christian education in the greater Athens, GA US area.
Westminster Hall is co-sponsoring with Faith Presbyterian this fall a Wednesday night book club called The Faith / Westminster Hall Book Club to be held at Faith Presbyterian Church at 6:00pm - 7:30pm in the Sanctuary.
Jack Fennema, Professor of Education, speak at WCA sponsored by Westminster Hall and Covenant College on "The Nature, Nurture and Discipline of Children".
www.westminsterhall.us   (267 words)

  
 Pepys' Diary: Westminster Hall
A footnote to 20 Jan 1660 says “These stationers and booksellers, whose shops disfigured Westminster Hall down to a late period, were a privileged class.
Westminster Hall is very much worth a visit.
Westminster Hall is now open every year to visitors in summer as part of the guided tour of the Houses of Parliament.
www.pepysdiary.com /p/128.php   (287 words)

  
 CNN.com - Westminster: Hall of history - April 22, 2002
LONDON, England -- The medieval hall where the Queen Mother is lying in state has a history of royal mourning as well as treachery.
Westminster Hall, where the coffin of Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, is resting on a purple-draped catafalque, is steeped in sadness and tragedy.
The rest of the Palace of Westminster was razed to the ground in 1834 after a stove overheated.
archives.cnn.com /2002/WORLD/europe/04/05/royals.hall   (408 words)

  
 Resident Life - Hall Council - Westminster College, Salt Lake City, UT   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Hall Council had a contest for the Residence Hall with the most donated items to receive a pizza party.
Carleson Hall, the winner, chose to take the money that would have been used for the pizza party to use for buying more cans to donate.
On the administrative side of things we post agendas for meetings by e-mail and in the residence halls, which all residents are invited to come.
www.wcslc.edu /resident_life/hall_council.cfm   (319 words)

  
 Original Artwork: John Gibbs: Westminster Hall   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
One of the most historic buildings in London, Westminster Hall was originally built by William II in 1097.
Westminster Hall was once the Great Hall of the Royal Palace of Westminster and the meeting place of the King's Great Council.
In 1986, Westminster Hall was the site of the seventy-fifth annual Commonwealth Parliamentary Association Conference, which was attended by nearly fifty nations from around the world.
www.windriverstudios.com /EB5SCPGE.htm   (334 words)

  
 BBC NEWS | Programmes | BBC Parliament | The Other Chamber
Westminster Hall is the second chamber of the House of Commons.
Examples of constituency issues that have been raised in Westminster Hall are local hospital services, funding of police forces and constituents' immigration problems.
BBC Parliament broadcasts recorded coverage of Westminster Hall every Saturday, Sunday and Monday morning when the Commons is sitting.
news.bbc.co.uk /1/hi/programmes/bbc_parliament/2295467.stm   (300 words)

  
 William Morris - Testimony on the Restoration of Westminster Hall   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
I see no necessity for making it particularly and specially ugly, but I mean to say that it ought to be perfectly simple and have visibly no intention of restoring or imitating the old work that was there, which, of course we know, followed something like the lines of the proposed restoration.
- But I have the greatest respect for Westminster Hall as a work of architecture, as every one must have, and in my own opinion the mere external effect of that which I advocate would be decidedly better than the addition of these buildings proposed by Mr.
On the contrary, I believe that such a cloister would do more harm than leaving the place quite open; because, first of all, you would get the London soot on it (that is to say, sulphuric acid, practically), and you would not have anything to wash it off with.
www.marxists.org /archive/morris/works/tmp/select.htm   (2783 words)

  
 The Birmingham Post (England) : The Queen Mother (1900-2002): Vast crowds expected to pass through Westminster ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Built by William Rufus, son of William the Conqueror, Westminster Hall has witnessed the trials of Guy Fawkes and King Charles I, and the lying-in-state of William Gladstone, Sir Winston Churchill and King George VI.
The hall boasts Europe's largest unsupported medieval roof and despite a fire which destroyed the original Palace of Westminster and the dropping of a dozen German bombs in 1941, the hall still stands as a proud reminder of British history.
Vast crowds are expected to pass through the hall to pay homage to the Queen Mother, whose coffin will be placed high on a purple-draped catafalque on the same spot where King George VI lay in February 1952.
static.highbeam.com /t/thebirminghampostengland/april052002/thequeenmother19002002vastcrowdsexpectedtopassthro/index.html   (268 words)

  
 FergusonTunnel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Westminster College’s Ferguson Tunnel will be open for a charity tour Friday, April 19, from 4-7 p.m.
The Ferguson Residence Life Staff is sponsoring the tour of this famous tunnel from Ferguson to Brown Hall, which was built in 1941 and closed in 1995.
Founded in 1852 and related to the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), Westminster College is ranked in the top ten in the country in graduation rate performance, according to U.S. News and World Report, and is the most affordable national liberal arts college in Pennsylvania.
www.westminster.edu /news/comm_site/news/2001-2002/FergusonTunnel.html   (317 words)

  
 Baltimore Travel Itinerary--Westminster Presbyterian Church and Cemetery
In 1852, the City of Baltimore passed a city ordinance prohibiting cemeteries which were not adjacent to a religious structure.
Its greatest significance is the protection is provides for the burial vaults and tombs that are preserved underneath it.
The Westminster Presbyterian Church and Cemetery is located at 509 W. Fayette St. The Cemetery is open to the public, call 410-706-2072 for further information.
www.cr.nps.gov /nr/travel/baltimore/b15.htm   (221 words)

  
 Westminster Hall Encyclopedia Article, Definition, History, Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
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encyclopedia.localcolorart.com /encyclopedia/Westminster_Hall   (4416 words)

  
 E. A. Poe Society of Baltimore
The church, now called Westminster Hall, is available for weddings, receptions and other events.
The grave, church and cemetery currently belong the Law School of the University of Maryland and are maintained by the Westminster Preservation Trust.
Westminster Hall and Poe's grave are in the southeast corner of Fayette and Greene Streets.
www.eapoe.org /balt/poegrave.htm   (1419 words)

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