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Topic: Whale shark


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In the News (Fri 14 Jun 19)

  
  Whale shark
The whale shark is the giant, slow swimming king of the fishes, slowly passing through the tropical waters of the oceans.
The whale shark is ovoviviparous, witch means that the egg cases are hatched in the uterus and that the mother then give birth to live young.
In the past, the whale shark has been of little interest to man. This has resulted in a near lack of scientific research on this species, and today still very little is known about ecology and behavior of the whale shark.
www.sharkology.com /whale.html   (817 words)

  
 Whale shark - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Whale sharks congregate at reefs off the Belizean Caribbean coast, supplementing their ordinary diet by feeding on the roe of giant cubera snappers, which spawn in these waters between the full and quarter moons of May, June and July,.
The reproductive habits of the whale shark are obscure.
Whale sharks are known to frequent the waters off Donsol in the Sorsogon province of the Philippines.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Whale_shark   (1455 words)

  
 Whale Shark - MSN Encarta
Whale Shark, common name for the largest known fish (see Shark), native to tropical seas around the world.
The whale shark feeds on small fishes and plankton strained out of the seawater by its long gill rakers; it is harmless to humans.
Young whale sharks hatch from fertilized eggs inside the body of the female and are then born alive to the outside.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761562391/Whale_Shark.html   (183 words)

  
 Whale Shark Food Habits : TravelYucatan.com
Whale Sharks feed on wide variety of planktonic (microscopic) and nektonic (larger free-swimming) prey, such as small crustaceans, schooling fishes, and occasionally on tuna and squids.
Whale sharks are always seen feeding passively in a vertical or near vertical position with the head at or near the surface.
Whale sharks move their heads from side to side, vacuuming in seawater rich in plankton, or aggressively cut swathes through schools of prey.
www.travelyucatan.com /whale_shark_holbox/whale_shark_isla_holbox_food.php   (453 words)

  
 Whale Shark (Rhincodon typus) - Marine Species Conservation
The whale shark (Rhincodon typus) is a relatively recent addition to the human record of the ocean and its inhabitants.
One of only three filter-feeding sharks (the other two being the basking and megamouth sharks), the whale shark feeds on minute organisms including krill, crab larvae, jellyfish etc. Although they have approximately 3000 tiny teeth (each less than 6mm in length), these teeth are not used while feeding.
Whale sharks have a broad distribution in tropical and warm temperate seas, usually between latitudes 30°N and 35°S. They are known to inhabit both deep and shallow coastal waters and the lagoons of coral atolls and reefs.
www.deh.gov.au /coasts/species/sharks/whaleshark/index.html   (1146 words)

  
 Diversion II / NJScuba.com - Questions & Answers About Whale Sharks   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Newborn whale sharks measuring 21 to 25 inches in length (55 to 63 cm) have been caught in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Central America, and in January 1996 there was an unconfirmed report that newborn whale sharks were found in the Marshall Islands.
In 1925 a whale shark estimated to be 60 feet in length (18 m) was caught in the Gulf of Thailand, but the largest accurately measured whale shark was a 40-foot, 7-inch (12.2 m) male caught in Bombay, India, in 1983.
Whale sharks have few natural predators and they are not actively fished by any Western nation, although their fins are highly valued in the Eastern Market.
www.njscuba.com /njscuba/misc_whale_sharks.html   (2390 words)

  
 Shedd Aquarium
The blue of the whale shark fades to white near the ventral or stomach area.
The whale shark also displays disruptive coloration or a form of camouflage that breaks up the shape of the animal making it harder to be seen.
Because whale sharks swim long distances all over the world through almost all the oceans, it is hard to track their population numbers.
www.sheddaquarium.org /sea/fact_sheets.cfm?id=64   (2009 words)

  
 Whale shark | Greenpeace USA
Whale sharks are grayish-brown with a white underbelly and white spots and lines.
Whale sharks have 5 large gill slits and the first gill slit (spiracle), which is used for breathing when the shark is resting on the sea floor, is located directly behind the shark's eye.
It is thought that the most significant threat to whale sharks is habitat loss or degradation in the form of overfishing of reef fish, coastal development, land-based pollution, increased boat traffic and noise pollution.
www.greenpeace.org /usa/campaigns/oceans/follow-the-journey/wildlife-facts/whale-shark   (282 words)

  
 ABC-KID.com - Whale Shark Pictures for Kids
The Whale Shark is a versatile suction-feeder that feeds on a wide variety of planktonic and nektonic organisms: masses of krill are regularly consumed, along with squid, and small fish: sardines, anchovies and mackerel.
The Whale Shark is often observed feeding near the surface.
There are numerous reports of pelagic gamefish (particularly skipjack, albacore and cobia) swimming with whale sharks; it is thought that the gamefish may prey on smaller fishes that, like the whale shark, are feeding on the plankton.
www.abc-kid.com /whaleshark   (320 words)

  
 Whale Shark Habitat : TravelYucatan.com
Each March and April, whale sharks are known to be aggregate on the continental shelf of the central western coast of Australia, particularly in the Ningaloo Reef area.
Whale sharks are thought to migrate to Ningaloo Reef each year to take advantage of the high zooplankton (microscopic animals) concentrations associated with large-scale coral spawning events occurring during the March and April full moons.
Whale sharks have smaller livers than most sharks and could conceivably control their buoyancy by swallowing some air as do the sand tiger sharks (Ondontaspis taurus).
www.travelyucatan.com /whale_shark_holbox/whale_shark_isla_holbox_habitat.php   (494 words)

  
 Whale Sharks: Rhincodon typus, statistics and conservation information
Whale sharks are not aggressive, and like the second largest of all sharks - the slightly smaller basking shark - cruise the oceans feeding on concentrations of zooplankton, small fish and squid.
Whale sharks have also been observed to hang vertically in the water and feed by sucking water into their mouths.
Whale sharks occur world-wide in tropical and temperate seas and are thought to be highly migratory.
whaleshark.freeservers.com /whale_shark.html   (1194 words)

  
 WHALE SHARK   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Whale sharks have often been seen resting on the surface of the ocean.
When the whale shark is laying on the top of the water the boats can hit the whale shark or while it is feeding the whale shark can bump into the boat itself.
Their teeth are too small for the shark to eat very big fish, and the whale sharks' mouths do not open that wide.
library.thinkquest.org /5316/whale.htm   (424 words)

  
 Whale Shark (Rhincodon typus) - Marine Species Conservation
The whale shark (Rhincodon typus) is a relatively recent addition to the human record of the ocean and its inhabitants.
One of only three filter-feeding sharks (the other two being the basking and megamouth sharks), the whale shark feeds on minute organisms including krill, crab larvae, jellyfish etc. Although they have approximately 3000 tiny teeth (each less than 6mm in length), these teeth are not used while feeding.
Whale sharks have a broad distribution in tropical and warm temperate seas, usually between latitudes 30°N and 35°S. They are known to inhabit both deep and shallow coastal waters and the lagoons of coral atolls and reefs.
www.environment.gov.au /coasts/species/sharks/whaleshark/index.html   (1137 words)

  
 SAGREN V2 #1~ Whale Shark migration, Australia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
This shark stayed in the area for several days, with re-sightings occurring while the shark was feeding at the surface during surveys con-ducted on the following evening, and again two days later by a Japanese documentary-maker while he was on SCUBA at 26m depth.
To date, no signals have been received by the satellite the shark may have simply remained deep, a satellite may not have been overhead while the shark was on the surface or the tag may have failed.
In addition to being tagged, the sharks were photographed and the identity of each recorded in the ECOCEAN Whale Shark Photo-identification Library (Sagren vol 1.4).
www.mcss.sc /SAGREN/Sagren_v2_1_art3.htm   (705 words)

  
 Shark Diving International: Whale Shark Diving   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Whale sharks have been observed to adopt a vertical orientation at the water's surface when feeding.
Whale sharks regularly associate with schools of scombrid fishes (i.e., mackerel and tuna).
The whale shark has a terminal mouth, ridges or keels on the side of its body and caudal peduncle, a broad head and a semilunate tail.
www.seesharks.com /whale-shark-data.html   (754 words)

  
 Whale Shark Rhincodon typus Smith, 1828) in Captivity
Expo Aquarium, Okinawa, 905-0206 Japan The husbandry of 16 whale sharks Rhincodon typus, from 1980 to 1998 at the Okinawa expo aquarium From 1980 to 1998 16 whale sharks, Rhincodon typus, were kept in captivity at Okinawa Expo Aquarium, Okinawa, Japan.
Only two of 16 sharks were females and 14 were males, The mean value and range in total length and body mass were 4.8 m and 3.1 to 6.3 m, and 814 kg and 290 to 1750 kg respectively.
The sharks kept in the nets are from the Aquarium's rotation system, where the sharks are moved to the nets when they have had a suitable amount of time living at the aquarium and then are eventually moved back, much like a resort or spa.
homepage.mac.com /mollet/Rt/Rt_captive.html   (1184 words)

  
 Florida Museum of Natural History Ichthyology Department: Whale Shark   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Whale shark, basking shark, and whaleshark are common names in the English language used to refer to this fish.
Whale sharks are greyish, bluish or brownish above, with an upper surface pattern of creamy white spots between pale, vertical and horizontal stripes.
Finally in 1995, an 11-meter female whale shark was harpooned off the eastern coast of Taiwan and 300 fetal specimens, ranging in length from 42 to 63cm, were taken from the two uteri.
www.flmnh.ufl.edu /fish/Gallery/Descript/Whaleshark/whaleshark.html   (2548 words)

  
 Whale Shark (Rhincodon typus)
The whale shark is both the biggest shark and the biggest fish.
Unlike many sharks, the mouth of the whale shark is at the tip of its body and not on the ventral
Whale sharks are also highly migratory and basically follow where the plankton, their primary source of food, leads.
www.thebigzoo.com /Animals/Whale_Shark.asp   (214 words)

  
 WHALE SHARK - Zoom Sharks
Whale sharks are filter feeders who sieve their tiny food through their large gills.
Whale sharks live in warm water (near the equator) both along the coast and in the open seas.
The Whale shark was long thought to be oviparous (an egg 14 inches (36 cm) long was found in the Gulf of Mexico in 1953; this would be the largest egg in the world).
www.enchantedlearning.com /subjects/sharks/species/Whaleshark.shtml   (681 words)

  
 Largest Whale Shark
Whale Sharks are in the marine subclass Elasmobranchii (Sharks and Rays) in the class Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fish).
Whale Sharks bodies are blue-grey in color bearing their signature pale yellow stripes and spot “carpet markings” with a white belly.
Whale Sharks were not persecuted in mass numbers by whalers historically because of their tremendous body weight combined with a relatively small liver.
www.tigerhomes.org /animal/whale-shark-2.cfm   (491 words)

  
 Whale Shark
Fish Identification Photos: Whale Shark, Rhincodon typus: The Whale Shark is a pelagic species that resembles a small submarine that slowly cruises all tropical seas with its mouth agape, filter-feeding on planktonic organisms, and on occasion, small fish.
The Whale Shark is a the sole member of the Rhincodontidae Family and the sole member of the Genus Rhincodon.
The Whale Shark prefers water between 21 degrees and 30 degrees Centigrade and is found in the first 2,000 feet of the water column.
www.mexfish.com /fish/wshark/wshark.htm   (470 words)

  
 Sharks.com - Whale Shark Pictures and Information at Sharks.com
Whale sharks scoop up water in their huge mouths, and as water passes over their gills and out through their gill slits, food is captured in filters attached to the gills.
Distribution: The whale shark is worldwide and is found in all tropical and subtropical oceans, along coastal regions, and enters lagoons on tropical islands.
Despite their large adult size whale sharks are very small at birth with lengths of about 2 feet long.
www.aasharks.com /types-of-sharks/whale-shark.htm   (526 words)

  
 Whale Shark Facts - Utila, Bay Islands, Honduras
The smallest whale shark seen by Deep Blue Divers in the waters of Utila was approximately 3 meters, the largest approximately 12 meters in length.
The whale shark is believed to be highly migratory and the deep waters of the north side of the island of Utila is on their migratory path.
In 1995, an 11-meter female whale shark was harpooned off the eastern coast of Taiwan and 300 fetal specimens, ranging in length from 42 to 63cm, were taken from the two uteri.
www.aboututila.com /ScubaInfo/Whale-Sharks/Whale-Shark-Facts.htm   (1333 words)

  
 NOVA Online | Island of the Sharks | Orectolobiformes
Shark bite: Divers must be careful of stepping on or near wobbegongs, which are well-camouflaged and have been known to bite in self defense or by mistaking a human foot for prey.
Young zebra sharks have a color pattern of yellow stripes on a dark brown background; the adult sharks have a pattern of small brown spots and blotches on a yellow background.
Shark bite: While feeding, the whale shark will occasionally do a "tail stand," keeping vertical in the water while they open their mouths to gulp down krill and small fishes.
www.pbs.org /wgbh/nova/sharks/world/orectolobiformes.html   (946 words)

  
 Biggest fish | whale shark
A whale is a mammal; a warm-blooded creature that has lungs and breathes air, gives birth to its young and nurses them with milk produced by mammary glands.
One interesting adaptation of the whale shark that scientists have discovered is that it has sensors that run the length of its body which are used for detecting pressure changes in the surrounding water.
Whale sharks swim with their huge mouths wide open to chow down, making it hard for their proportionately small eyes to see where they're going.
www.extremescience.com /BiggestFish.htm   (446 words)

  
 The Whale Shark
Despite its monstrous size, there is little to fear from the whale shark, unless of course you are one of the millions of plankton the whale shark feeds on.
With the abnormally large size of the whale shark's mouth, around four feet in width, the animal is able to take in vast amounts of water laden with plankton and other small sea creatures.
The first whale shark to be displayed in public was held at the Izumito Sea Paradise Aquarium in 1934.
www.milton.edu /academics/pages/marinebio/whalesrk.html   (493 words)

  
 Whale Shark, Rhincodon typus
Whale Sharks feed by filtering small crustaceans, squid and fishes from the water using filtering screens on the gills.
The Whale Shark is a pelagic species that occurs in continental shelf and offshore waters in both tropical and warm temperate waters of all oceans.
Whale Sharks follow migratory patterns that may be related to the presence of their prey.
www.amonline.net.au /fishes/fishfacts/fish/rtypus.htm   (352 words)

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