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Topic: Wilhelm Wundt


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In the News (Fri 16 Nov 18)

  
  Wilhelm Max Wundt - LoveToKnow 1911
WILHELM MAX WUNDT (1832-), German physiologist and philosopher, was born on the 16th of August 1832 at Neckarau, in Baden.
The list of Wundt's works is long and comprehensive, including physiology, psychology, logic and ethics.
The metaphysical or ontological part of psychology is in Wundt's view the actual part, and with this the science of nature and the science of mind are to be brought into relation, and thus constituted as far as possible philosophical sciences.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Wilhelm_Max_Wundt   (355 words)

  
  Wilhelm Wundt
Wilhelm Max Wundt (August 16, 1832-August 31, 1920), German physiologist and psychologist, is generally acknowledged as the founder of experimental psychology[?].
Wundt subscribed to a "psycho-physical parallelism", which was supposed to stand above both materialism and idealism.
It was during this period that Wundt offered the first course ever taught in scientific psychology, stressing the use of experimental methods drawn from the natural sciences[?].
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/wi/Wilhelm_Max_Wundt.html   (329 words)

  
 Human Intelligence: Wilhelm Wundt
Wundt's revolutionary approach to psychological experimentation moved psychological study from the domain of philosophy and the natural sciences and began to utilize physiological experimental techniques in the laboratory.
To Wundt, the essence of all total adjustments of the organism was a psychophysical process, an organic response mediated by both the physiological and the psychological.
Wundt perceived psychology as part of an elaborate philosophy where mind is seen as an activity, not a substance.
www.indiana.edu /~intell/wundt.shtml   (570 words)

  
 WILHELM WUNDT : Encyclopedia Entry
Wilhelm Maximilian Wundt (August 16, 1832–August 31, 1920) was a German physiologist and psychologist.
Wundt subscribed to a "psychophysical parallelism" (which entirely excludes the possibility of a mind-body/cause-effect relationship), which was supposed to stand above both materialism and idealism.
Titchener, a two-year resident of Wundt's lab and one of Wundt's most vocal "proponents" in the United States, is responsible for several English translations and mistranslations of Wundt's works that supported his own views and approach, which he termed structuralism and claimed was wholly consistent with Wundt's position.
bibleocean.com /OmniDefinition/Wilhelm_Wundt   (933 words)

  
 Pioneers of Psychology [2001 Tour] - School of Education & Psychology
Wundt was seeking to study, not the relation of the body and mind, but, instead, the relation between sensation on the one hand and theprocess of psychological judgment on the other.
Wilhelm was born at the village of Neckarau near Heidelberg in Baden on August 16, 1832, the son of a Lutheran pastor.".
To Wundt, mankind shows development through a series of successive levels with primitive man as the lowest grade of culture, moving on to the totemic age, thence to the age of heroes and gods, and, finally, the age in which we are now living, that of the advance toward humanity.
educ.southern.edu /tour/who/pioneers/wundt.html   (6077 words)

  
 Wilhelm Wundt Psychology 1
Wilhelm Wundt and Introspection: the cultural contribution of the father of psychology
Wilhelm Wundt is thought of as one of the founding fathers, if not the founding father of psychology.
Wilhelm Maximilian Wundt was born on August 16, 1832 in the town of Neckarau in Germany.
wilhelmwundt.com   (185 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Wilhelm Wundt   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Wundt subscribed to a "psycho-physical parallelism", which was supposed to stand above both materialism and idealism.
His epistemology was an eclectic mixture of the ideas of Baruch Spinoza, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Immanuel Kant, and Hegel.
It was during this period that Wundt offered the first course ever taught in scientific psychology, stressing the use of experimental methods drawn from the natural sciences[?].
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/wi/Wilhelm_Wundt   (354 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Wilhelm Maximilian Wundt (August 16, 1832 – August 31, 1920) was a German physiologist and psychologist.
Wundt subscribed to a "psychophysical parallelism" (which entirely excludes the possibility of a mind-body/cause-effect relationship), which was supposed to stand above both materialism and idealism.
Wundt was born at Neckarau, in Baden, as an only child to parents Maximilian Wundt (a Lutheran minister), and his wife Marie Frederike.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Wilhelm_Wundt   (804 words)

  
 Wilhelm Wundt
Wilhelm Wundt, the son of a Lutheran clergyman, was born in 1832 in a small German village called Nekarau.
Wundt's use of a systematic methodological approach in tackling psychological problems was a landmark in establishing psychology as a science.
Wundt pursued his work with the boundless energy and enthusiasm up until the time of his death near Leipzig, two weeks after his 88th birthday in 1920.
www.dushkin.com /connectext/psy/ch01/wundt.mhtml   (212 words)

  
 Narrative Psychology: Wilhelm Wundt (Theorists)
Wundt was born in Neckarau near Mannheim (Baden) in southwest Germany on August 16, 1832.
Wundt gathers together a far-ranging collection of data--mostly drawn from ethnographic studies conducted by social scientist throughout the 19th century--which serve to portray the developmental stages expressed across diverse human cultures and to provide an understanding of the cultural influences exerted upon individuals within particular national communities.
Wundt's sensitivity to the role of language, in particular, as a entry point to understand social and cultural behavior anticipated what some 20th century psychologists and psycholinguists would begin to examine from other perspectives several decades later (e.g., Vygotsky).
web.lemoyne.edu /~hevern/nr-theorists/wundt_wilhelm.html   (1722 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Wundt,
Wundt stressed the use of scientific methods in psychology, particularly through the use of introspection.
He also studied under Wilhelm Wundt in Leipzig, and was appointed professor of psychiatry at the Univ. of Dorpat, Heidelberg (1891) and Münich (1903), where he also directed a clinic.
Wilhelm Wundt was perhaps the first psychologist to study attention, distinguishing between broad and restricted fields of awareness.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Wundt,   (873 words)

  
 Wilhelm Max Wundt: Encyclopedia of Psychology
Wilhelm Wundt was born on August 16, 1832, in Baden, in a suburb of Mannheim called Neckarau.
Wundt attended the Gymnasium at Bruschel and at Heidelberg, the University of Tübingen for a year, then Heidelberg for more than three years, receiving a medical degree in 1856.
During the period from 1857 to 1874, Wundt evolved from a physiologist to a psychologist.
soc.enotes.com /gale-psychology-encyclopedia/wilhelm-max-wundt   (150 words)

  
 European Traces of the History of Psychology: Paul Broca
Wundt was born in 1832 in Neckerau, Germany, and died in 1920 in Grossbothen, near Leipzig.
Wundt was of normal height, as indicated by the length of his leather-handled walking stick, visible in my right hand.
Wundt is buried in Südfriedhof (South Cemetery), some distance southeast of the city center.
mysite.verizon.net /donrae19/wundt.htm   (983 words)

  
 Wilhelm Wundt
Wilhelm Wundt established the first psychological laboratory in 1879 in Leipzig, Germany.
Wundt asked subjects to introspect about the feelings and sensations they had in response to a physical stimulus.
For example, Wundt might place a rock in a person's hand and the person would tell him all of the sensations that he was feeling as a result of having a rock in his hand.
kccesl.tripod.com /hypertextstudy/wundt.html   (129 words)

  
 Mind, Brain, and the Experimental Psychology of Consciousness
Wundt [see figure 39] was born at Neckarau, in the vicinity of Mannheim and received his early education at the hands of a private tutor and at the Bruchsal Gymnasium.
On the 24th of March, 1879, however, Wundt submitted a petition to the Royal Saxon Ministry of Education in which he formally requested a regular financial allocation for the establishment and support of a collection of psychophysical apparatus.
Experimental psychology, born with Fechner, nurtured by Helmholtz and Donders, was to be raised by Wundt.
serendip.brynmawr.edu /Mind/Consciousness.html   (2355 words)

  
 Wilhelm Wundt
Wilhelm Maximilian Wundt (August 16, 1832 – August 31, 1920) was a German physiologist and psychologist.
Wundt combined philosophical introspection with techniques and laboratory apparatuses brought over from his physiological studies with Hermann von Helmholtz, as well as many of his own design.
Wundt was born at Neckarau, Baden, as an only child to parents Maximilian Wundt (a Lutheran minister), and his wife Marie Frederike.
pedia.counsellingresource.com /openpedia/Wilhelm_Wundt   (894 words)

  
 Classics in the History of Psychology -- Introduction to Wundt (1874) by R. H. Wozniak
The answer, clear in the opening lines of the first edition, is that far from considering it as covering "the range of psychological fact," he thought of it as establishing a new borderline science, a "physiological psychology," standing midway between physiology, on the one hand, and psychology on the other.
As Wundt described it, "Psychological introspection goes hand in hand with the methods of experimental physiology, and the application of the latter to the former has given rise to the psychophysical methods as a separate branch of experimental research.
Nor is it surprising that Wundt, despite his clear interest in psychological topics far beyond the range of physiological psychology and his clear recognition of the limits of the experimental method, should have become known as the founder of experimental, physiological psychology.
psychclassics.yorku.ca /Wundt/Physio/wozniak.htm   (784 words)

  
 Athenaeum Reading Room - Outlines of Psychology(1897) - DR. WILHELM WUNDT(1832-1920)
Born and educated in Germany, Wundt early gravitated toward psychology.
Wundt in his scientific experiments added alkoline and metallic tastes.
They are typical in the sense that this characteristic of being occurrences is held to be true for all the contents of psychical experience.
evans-experientialism.freewebspace.com /wundt.htm   (4643 words)

  
 Wilhelm Maximilian Wundt > Notes (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
Wundt strictly distinguishes his “psychological” voluntarism, which he believes is simply an expression of a phenomenological fact, from the “metaphysical” voluntarism promoted, say, by Schopenhauer (1911a: 158).
This is, e.g., Boring's position: “Wundt never held that the experimental method is adequate to the whole of psychology: the higher processes, he thought, must be got at by the study of the history of human nature, his Völkerpsychologie” (Boring, 1950: 328).
Wundt specifically distinguishes Völkerpsychologie from what he calls “ethnic characterology” (L III: 227); yet this is what he seems to have pursued in his 1915 book, obviously under the influence of war, on The Nations and their Philosophy.
plato.stanford.edu /entries/wilhelm-wundt/notes.html   (2505 words)

  
 Classics in the History of Psychology -- Introduction to Wundt (1896/1897) by R. H. Wozniak
The break with Wundt, however, was slow in developing.[6] During his first few years in Leipzig, Külpe was something of a star in Wundt's laboratory.
Wundt's goal was not only to offer students an introduction to psychology but to produce what was, in effect, a countertext to that of Külpe, one that would provide students with the 'correct' conception of the nature and scope of psychology.
the corporeal individual,'[10] Wundt defined psychology as the study of experience 'in its relations to the subject'.[11] The point of reference, in other words, was not the individual as a nervous system, but the individual as an active apprehender of the contents of experience.
psychclassics.yorku.ca /Wundt/Outlines/wozniak.htm   (755 words)

  
 [No title]
Wilhelm Wundt (1832-1920) is generally known as the founder of psychology as a formal academic discipline.
Wundt held the first academic course in psychology in 1862, and he set up the first experimental laboratory where he conducted a series of experiments to determine the dimensions of feeling and perception.
Wilhelm Wundt is widely recognized as a founder of modern experimental psychology.
www.lycos.com /info/wilhelm-wundt.html   (630 words)

  
 Wilhelm Wundt - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Wilhelm Wundt - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Wundt, Wilhelm Max (1832-1920), German psychologist, generally recognized as the founder of scientific psychology as an independent discipline....
The philosophic, rather than the scientific, method was the main mode for inquiry about learning and the mind until 1879, when the German...
encarta.msn.com /Wilhelm_Wundt.html   (127 words)

  
 Wilhelm Wundt and William James
Wilhelm Wundt was born in the village of Neckerau in Baden, Germany on August 16, 1832.
The method that Wundt developed is a sort of experimental introspection: The researcher was to carefully observe some simple event -- one that could be measured as to quality, intensity, or duration -- and record his responses to variations of those events.
Wundt suggesteed that the fundamental unit of language is the sentence -- not the word or the sound.
webspace.ship.edu /cgboer/wundtjames.html   (4865 words)

  
 WILHELM WUNDT
Wilhelm Wundt was born on June 16, 1832 in Neckarau which was a small town near Mannheim Germany.
Wundt's use of the word physiologischen, or physiological, misled some historians because in the mid 1800s Germany, this term referred to the experimental treatment of subject matter and not to physiology as we know it today.
Wundt thought that although experimental methods were important and necessary in the study of psychology, it could not be the only method of investigation.
www3.niu.edu /acad/psych/Millis/History/2002/wundt.htm   (877 words)

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