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Topic: William Clito


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In the News (Sat 25 May 19)

  
  William The Clito - LoveToKnow 1911
WILLIAM THE CLITO (1101-1128) was the son of Robert, duke of Normandy, by his marriage with Sibylla of Conversano.
That sovereign joined with the discontented Norman barons and others of Henry's enemies in recognizing William as the rightful claimant to the duchy; Robert, a prisoner whom there was no hope of releasing, they appear to have regarded as dead in the eye of the law.
In 1122 or 1123 William married Sibylle, daughter of Fulk of Anjou, and with her received the county of Maine; but Henry I. prevailed upon the Curia to annul this union, as being within the forbidden degrees.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /William_The_Clito   (357 words)

  
 William Clito Info - Bored Net - Boredom   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
William Clito (1101-July 28, 1128) was the son of Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy, by his marriage with Sibylla of Conversano.
That year, William was given by Louis the hand of Johanna of Montferrat, half-sister of the French queen, and Louis asserted his right to settle the succession to the vacant fief of Flanders.
William had some claim on the county, being the grandson of Matilda of Flanders and thus a great-grandson of Baldwin V of Flanders, and Louis selected him instead of several rival claimants.
www.borednet.com /e/n/encyclopedia/w/wi/william_clito.html   (612 words)

  
 William The Breton - LoveToKnow 1911
William is supposed to have been present at the battle of Bouvines.
In both works William speaks in very laudatory terms of the king; but his writings are valuable because he had personal knowledge of many of the facts which he relates.
William's works have been edited with introduction by H. Delaborde as Ouvres de Rigord et de Guillaume le Breton (Paris, 1882-1885), and have been translated into French by Guizot in Collection des memoires relatifs a l'histoire de France, tomes xi.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /William_The_Breton   (254 words)

  
 William Clito   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
William Clito (1101 - July 28 1128) was the son of Robert Curthose Duke of Normandy by his marriage with Sibylla of He had a claim on both Normandy England and became count of Flanders.
William had some claim the county being the grandson of Matilda of Flanders and thus a great-grandson of Baldwin V of Flanders and Louis selected him instead of rival claimants.
William faced a rebellion and Thierry of emerged as the leading rival for rule the county.
www.freeglossary.com /William_Clito   (996 words)

  
 Qwika - similar:William_II_of_England
William VII of Aquitaine, (Pierre-Guillaume in French) (1023 – 1058) was the Duke of Aquitaine and Count of Poitiers as William V of Poitiers between 1039 and 1058, following his half-brother Otto of Aquitaine.
William was the third son of William V of Aquitaine by his wife Agnes of Burgundy.
William I "the Lion" (known in Gaelic as Uilliam Garm1 or William the Rough), (1142/1143 - December 4 1214) reigned as King of Scots from 1165 to 1214.
www.qwika.com /rels/William_II_of_England   (1536 words)

  
 William Clito - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
William Clito (October 25, 1102 – July 28, 1128) was the son of Robert Curthose, Duke of Normandy, by his marriage with Sibylla of Conversano.
In 1122 or 1123 William married Sibylle, another daughter of Fulk of Anjou, and with her received the county of Maine.
Sandy Burton Hicks, "The Impact of William Clito upon the Continental Policies of Henry I of England," Viator 10 (1979), 1-21.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/William_Clito   (690 words)

  
 The Norman Dynasties
William, despite the status of his birth, was chosen by his relatives to succeed his father [who died on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land] as duke.
William II (known as William Rufus) was strong, outspoken and ruddy (hence his nickname 'Rufus'), William II (reigned 1087-1100) extended his father's policies, taking royal power to the far north of England.
William Clito died in 1128, and Henry I was able to complete his conquest of Normandy, returning the duchy to the dynasty on the Englsih throne.
xenophongroup.com /montjoie/norman.htm   (2438 words)

  
 Maximilian Genealogy Master Database 2000 - pafg83 - Generated by Personal Ancestral File   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
William DE WARREN Earl of Warren was born 1055 and died 24 Jun 1088.
Clito WILLIAM 111 Count [Parents] was born 1101 in Rouen, Normandy, France.
William of Boulogne DE BLOIS was born 1135 and died 11 Oct 1159.
www.peterwestern.f9.co.uk /maximilia/pafg83.htm   (438 words)

  
 Kings, Queens, Presidents and First Ladies
Son of Duke Robert II Curthose (and grandson of William the Conqueror and Matilda of Flanders), William Clito was supported by Louis VI of France in claiming the duchy when his father was imprisoned (1106) by the English.
Henry's right to Normandy was challenged by William Clito, son of the captive Robert Curthouse, and Henry was obliged to repel two major assaults against eastern Normandy by William Clito's supporters: Louis VI of France, Count Fulk of Anjou, and the restless Norman barons who detested Henry's ubiquitous officials and high taxes.
Prince of England William "Atheling" Beauclerc-[19137] was born on 8-5-1103 in Selby, Yorkshire, England and died on 11-26-1119 at Sea at age 16.
www.livelyroots.com /kings/d6.htm   (1553 words)

  
 Timelines - Henry I
A fourth son, Henry, was born to William I and Matilda of Flanders at Selby, Yorkshire.
William died in France from wounds received at the siege of Mantes.
William I was buried in St Stephen's Abbey, Caen, Normandy.
www.historyonthenet.com /Chronology/timelinehenryi.htm   (1405 words)

  
 BBC - History - Henry I (c.1069 - 1135)
Henry was born in England in 1068 or 1069, the fourth son of William the Conqueror.
William was killed in a hunting accident in August 1100, and Henry had himself crowned a few days later, taking advantage of Robert's absence on crusade.
By 1120, however, the barons had submitted, Henry's only legitimate son William had been married to the daughter of the powerful Count of Anjou and Louis VI of France had agreed terms for peace after defeat in battle.
www.bbc.co.uk /history/historic_figures/henry_i_king.shtml   (451 words)

  
 Flemish Roots
France's Louis still supported William Clito, and a partisan struggle raged in Flanders until William was killed in the siege of Aalst in June 1128.
William was married to Matilda the eldest daughter of Baldwin V, Count of Flanders and William’s continental allies were Flemish.
Malcolm's successor, his brother William I (1165-1214), known as "the Lion", continued the Flemish settlement policy, as well as utilizing Flemish aid in other matters: In 1173, when William invaded northern England, he was reinforced by a Flemish contingent sent by Philip d' Alsace, Count of Flanders.
hunthill.4t.com /custom3.html   (4179 words)

  
 On a Tall White Ship - Alternate History Discussion Board
Loius VI of France however championed William Clito and arranged for him to be married to Johanna of Montferrat, daughter of Renier I of Montferrat and Gisela of Burgundy, and thus half-sister of the French queen.
William had some claim on the county, being the grandson of Matilda of Flanders and thus a great-grandson of Baldwin V of Flanders.
Louis VI of France however championed William Clito and arranged for him to be married to Johanna of Montferrat, daughter of Renier I of Montferrat and Gisela of Burgundy, and thus half-sister of the French queen.
www.alternatehistory.com /discussion/showthread.php?t=29264   (1995 words)

  
 Louis VI
After the victory of Tinchebray (1106) Louis supported the claims of William Clito, son of Robert, duke of Normandy, against Henry I. A ruthless war followed, in which Louis was at times reduced to the sorest straits.
He caused the barons to elect as their count in Arras the same William Clito who claimed Normandy, and who was closely bound to the king.
The death of William Clito, and a savage war with his own seneschal, prevented Louis from effectually resenting this attitude; but Thierry of Alsace, the new count, consented in 1128 to receive from Louis the investiture of all his French fiefs, and henceforth lived on good terms with him.
www.nndb.com /people/167/000093885   (1101 words)

  
 Helias of Saint-Saens - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Helias was a relative by marriage and guardian of William Clito, son of Robert Curthose.
The consequence was exile for Helias, whose lands were forfeited, to the benefit of William de Warenne, 2nd Earl of Surrey.
William was hastily carried off to France by friendly hands, in the absence of his guardian.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Helias_of_Saint-Saens   (355 words)

  
 thePeerage.com - Exhibit
Henry I 1068-1135, king, fourth son of William the Conqueror and Matilda, was born, it is said, at Selby in Yorkshire (Monasticon, iii.
William of Breteuil refused to deliver them, declaring that, as Robert was his father's first-born, he was the rightful heir.
William's death relieved him from all further attempts on the part of Louis to shake his power, and robbed the nobles of Normandy of the weapon which they had so often used against him.
www.thepeerage.com /e27.htm   (11682 words)

  
 ModernView2
The choice was confirmed, in return for numerous and significant concessions, by the barons and towns of Flanders, and William was duly invested with the county and officially received as count throughout it.
William finally won a decisive victory over him at the battle of Axpoel on June 21, and effectively reestablished himself as count.
The defeated Thierry was pursued and besieged in Aalst on July 12 by William and Godfrey, duke of Louvain, but William was mortally wounded in the course of this siege and died on July 27 or 28.
home.cc.umanitoba.ca /~blanch/CharlesDW/ModernView2.htm   (2060 words)

  
 WILLIAM THE CLITO (1 r... - Online Information article about WILLIAM THE CLITO (1 r...
WILLIAM (A.S. Wilhelm, O. Norse Vilhidlmr; O. Ger.
Norman barons and others of Henry's enemies in recognizing William as the rightful claimant to the duchy; Robert, a prisoner whom there was no See also:
In 1122 or 1123 William married Sibylle, daughter of Fulk of Anjou, and with her received the See also:
encyclopedia.jrank.org /WIL_YAK/WILLIAM_THE_CLITO_1_rot1128_.html   (550 words)

  
 William
William is the modern English form of a Norman name, Willelm, comming from the Germanic name Wilhelm, or Willahelm.
William was a later Germanic name and did not appear in England in the Anglo-Saxon period.
It was brought to the island with William the Conqueror and the Norman French in 1066.
www.geocities.com /edgarbook/names/w/william.html   (436 words)

  
 (William - Yrsa Helgasson )   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
William (Duke of Gloucest) (24 Jul 1689 - 30 Jul 1700)
William II (King of the Neth) (6 Dec 1792 - 17 Mar 1849)
William III Atheling (Duke of Normandy) (BEF 5 Aug 1103 - 25 Nov 1120)
home.comcast.net /~smcdonald91/genealogy/index/ind0041.html   (181 words)

  
 The Age of Chivalry - Henry I 'Beaucleric', King of England 1100-1135   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Although the finger of suspicion over his death does seem to point to him it is doubtful whether he would have been in the vicinity at the same time as his brother and the fact that he had to act with incredible speed to seize the crown.
William of Mortain and Earls Robert and William suffered similar fates as they saw their English lands confiscated.
When in 1127 Henry received news that William Clito, son of Robert Curthose, had become the count of Flanders he approached Count Fulk of Anjou with a marriage proposal between his daughter Matilda and Fulk’s heir, Geoffrey Plantagenet.
www.taoc.co.uk /content/view/29/43   (1049 words)

  
 Battle of Bremule
William Clito, son of Robert duke of Normandy, armed himself there so that he might free his father from his long imprisonment and recover his ancestral inheritance.
In the forefront William Crispin and eighty knights charged the Normans, but their horses were quickly killed, and they were all surrounded and cut off.
Prince William too returned to his cousin, William Clito, the palfrey he had lost in the battle on the previous day, and sent gifts of other necessary things to the exile at the suggestion of his provident father.
www.deremilitari.org /RESOURCES/SOURCES/bremule.htm   (1850 words)

  
 thePeerage.com - Edward Balliol, King of Scotland and others
She married Robert III 'Curthose', 8th Duc de Normandie, son of William I 'the Conqueror', King of England and Matilda de Flandre, in 1100 in Apulia, Sicily, Italy.
     William III 'Clito', Comte de Flandre was born in 1101 in Rouen, Caux, France.
She married, firstly, William III 'Clito', Comte de Flandre, son of Robert III 'Curthose', 8th Duc de Normandie and Sybilla de Conversano, in 1123.
www.thepeerage.com /p10250.htm   (1247 words)

  
 Flanders, Brittany, Burgundy, Anjou, Normandy, Blois, Champagne, Toulouse, etc.
William, however, was killed in battle in 1128, otherwise he would have inherited England in 1135, instead of his cousin Stephen of Blois.
William VIII of Aquitaine acquired the Duchy of Gascony in 1052.
Duke William V had three wives, and subsequent Dukes were descendants of William VIII, son of William V and Agnes of Burgundy.
www.friesian.com /flanders.htm   (10740 words)

  
 Henry the Fowler Summary
On his father's death in 1089, Henry's brothers, Robert and William II, inherited Normandy and England respectively; Henry was left £5,000, with which he bought land in western Normandy.
In 1109 his daughter Matilda was promised to the emperor Henry V; in 1113 he agreed that his son and heir William should marry the daughter of Fulk, Count of Anjou.
William's death by drowning in 1120 was a political disaster.
www.bookrags.com /Henry_the_Fowler   (2094 words)

  
 Matilda   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Another major political advantage hand accrued to the English king when William Clito, the presumptive heir to Normandy as the surviving male of the line of William the Conqueror, received a mortal battle wound a the siege of Alost in July 1128.
Normandy, which to the death of Clito was a disputed duchy, then was incontestably in the succession rights of the English royal family.
The Londoners soon welcomed Stephen's queen and William of Ypres and a Kentish force into the city: unfortunately there was then extensive pillaging in the southern part of the city.
idcs0100.lib.iup.edu /WestCivI/matilda.htm   (1540 words)

  
 Modern View of those Events
William of Ypres, the man put forward by Berthulf, had to make room for William Clito, a prince of royal blood.
Even in 1127 the traditional themes of Flemish political history were already apparent: throwing off the yoke of the French king in which of the Gent and Brugge burghers were the prominent determining power factors.
Galbert of Brugge, clerk in the Count's government, wrote the story of the murder and its aftermath that made first Count William of Ypres, then William Clito, then Diederik of Alsace the Count of Flanders.
home.cc.umanitoba.ca /~blanch/CharlesHP/ModernView1.htm   (408 words)

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