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Topic: William III


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In the News (Mon 22 Jul 19)

  
  WILLIAM III,
As a result of William’s superior diplomacy, however, which also included the strengthening of ties with England by his marriage (1677) to the English princess Mary (eldest daughter of his uncle, James, duke of York, later King James II), Louis XIV agreed to terminate the war on terms favorable to the Dutch.
William accepted the Declaration of Rights passed by the Convention Parliament, which met on Jan. 22, 1689, and on February 13, William and Mary were proclaimed joint sovereigns of England.
William’s reign continued to be marked by abortive Jacobite plots to restore James to the throne.
www.history.com /encyclopedia.do?articleId=225905   (941 words)

  
  Encyclopedia: William III of Orange   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
William III and II (14 November 1650–8 March 1702; also known as William Henry and William of Orange) was Prince of Orange from his birth, King of England and Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scotland from 11 April 1689, in each case until his death.
William, the son of William II, Prince of Orange and Mary, Princess Royal and Princess of Orange, was born in The Hague.
William II was the Stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht, Gelderland and Overijssel.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/William-III-of-Orange   (3251 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: William III of England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
William III felt insecure about his position; though only his wife was formally elligble to assume the throne, he wished to reign as King in his own right, rather than as a mere consort.
William III (William of Orange) King of England, Scotland and Ireland, Stadtholder of the Netherlands The Battle of the Boyne was a turning point in the Williamite war in Ireland between the deposed King James II of England and VII of Scotland and his son-in-law and successor, William...
William I (William the Silent) William I, Prince of Orange, Count of Nassau (April 24, 1533 – July 10, 1584) was the main leader of the Dutch revolt against the Spanish that set off the Eighty Years War and resulted in the formal independence of the United Provinces in 1648.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/William-III-of-England   (10409 words)

  
 English Monarchs - Kings and Queens of England - William III and Mary.
William III of Orange was born at The Hague on 4th November, 1650.
He was the posthumous son of William II of Orange and of Mary Stuart, the eldest daughter of Charles I and Henrietta Maria of France.
William III and Mary II formally promised to rule according to law and to be guided by Parliament.
www.englishmonarchs.co.uk /stuart_6.htm   (915 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - William III (of England)
William III (of England), called William of Orange (1650-1702), king of England (1689-1702), and stadtholder of the Netherlands (1672-1702), who helped form the Grand Alliance and led England in its so-called Glorious Revolution.
Born on November 14, 1650, in The Hague, Holland, William was the posthumous son of William II, prince of Orange and stadtholder of the Netherlands, and Mary, eldest daughter of the English king Charles I.
As a result of William’s superior diplomacy, however, which also included the strengthening of ties with England by his marriage (1677) to the English princess Mary (eldest daughter of his uncle, James, duke of York, later King James II), Louis XIV agreed to terminate the war on terms favorable to the Dutch.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761572363/William_III_(of_England).html   (545 words)

  
 William III, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
William, however, took an English army to the Spanish Netherlands in 1691 and was constantly involved in campaigning until the conclusion of peace by the Treaty of Ryswick (1697).
William and the Whigs were also responsible for the Toleration Act (1689), which lifted some of the disabilities imposed on Protestant nonconformists, and for allowing the Licensing Act to lapse (1695), a great step toward freedom of the press.
William sought to maintain royal prerogatives but was unable to prevent passage of the Triennial Act (1694), which required a new Parliament every three years, and the Act of Settlement (1701), which imposed the first statutory limitation on royal control of foreign policy.
www.bartleby.com /65/wi/Will3Eng.html   (706 words)

  
 William III of Orange (Pepys' Diary)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
William III who was born in 1650 was the son of Mary, the eldest daughter of Charles I, and William II, the Stadtholder, who died shortly before his birth.
William’s fortunes changed in 1672 when De Witt, along with his brother were killed by a mob in The Hague for Dutch humiliation and practical annihilation at the hands of the French and English during the Second Dutch War of Charles II.
As Parliament was de facto the ruler of England, and William III had in the Netherlands more power than the stadholdership originally contained (a stadholder was a “servant” of the Provinces) it was said that he was king in the Netherlands an stadholder in England.
www.pepysdiary.com /p/781.php   (814 words)

  
 King William County History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
William and Mary were invited to England by seven leaders of the English political parties, the Tory and Whig, who were concerned about James' absolutist royal leanings, his inability to cooperate with Parliament and Catholic succession to the throne following the birth of a son to James in 1688.
The new monarchs were crowned King William III and Queen Mary II of England, Scotland and Ireland during a coronation in Westminster Abbey on April 11, 1689.
William reigned during an almost unprecedented period in the transition to a parliamentary form of English government that marked the end of royal prerogative.
www.co.king-william.va.us /history_tourism.htm   (4653 words)

  
 William III, Stadholder-King - Rijksmuseum Amsterdam - National Museum for Art and History
William III of Orange was the son of William II, born shortly after his father's death.
Stadholderless Period (1650-1672)A series of bitter conflicts with Stadholder William II led the province of Holland to oppose the appointment of a successor after the latter's death in 1650.
The States General resolved that it was not constitutionally necessary for a province to appoint a stadholder.
www.rijksmuseum.nl /aria/aria_encyclopedia/00046842?lang=en   (287 words)

  
 King William III
His father William II Prince of Orange died on October 27th in the year 1650 and his mother was Mary Stuart, daughter of Charles I. William was brought up in the Protestant Faith and he spoke English, French, Dutch, German, Latin and Spanish.
William was asked to deliver England from the tyranny of James II but he demanded an invitation before he would help.
James and William and their armies were to remain at an equal distance from London and both men were to attend the next session of Parliament.
www.kirkdale113.freeserve.co.uk /king.htm   (2433 words)

  
 History of the Monarchy > The Stuarts > Mary II and William III
The Bill of Rights had established the succession with the heirs of Mary II, Anne and William III in that order, but by 1700 Mary had died childless, Anne's only surviving child (out of 17 children), the Duke of Gloucester, had died at the age of 11 and William was dying.
Although Louis was forced to recognise William as King under the Treaty of Ryswick (1697), William's policy of intervention in Europe was costly in terms of finance and his popularity.
William's Dutch advisers were resented, and in 1699 his Dutch Blue Guards were forced to leave the country.
www.royal.gov.uk /output/Page100.asp   (1015 words)

  
 BBC - History - William III
Today William III is mostly remembered for his association with the Battle of the Boyne.
For many people, the most memorable image of William III is bound close to the Battle of the Boyne, in which he defeated the Catholic James II (James VII of Scotland) in 1690.
William was born in the Hague in 1650.
www.bbc.co.uk /history/british/civil_war_revolution/william_iii_01.shtml   (302 words)

  
 William of Orange & the borders of Nord/Pas-de-Calais
William of Orange and the borders of Nord/Pas-de-Calais
William was a life-long opponent of French king Louis XIV
But William died in 1702, and the "War of the Spanish Succession" ended in 1713 with the French withdrawing to more-or-less the present borders, and Austria taking over what was left, apart from the Dutch republic.
www.theotherside.co.uk /tm-heritage/background/william-orange.htm   (896 words)

  
 World Book || William III   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
William III (1650-1702), also known as William of Orange, became King of England, Scotland, and Ireland in 1689.
William was stadholder (governor) of the Netherlands when prominent English leaders became dissatisfied with King James II of England and invited William to intervene.
William was born in The Hague, the Netherlands.
www.worldbook.com /wc/features/queen/html/williamiii.htm   (374 words)

  
 William III, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland
William III, 1650–1702, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1689–1702); son of William II, prince of Orange, stadtholder of the United Provinces of the Netherlands, and of Mary, oldest daughter of King Charles I of England.
William III, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland: Early Life - Early Life He was born at The Hague after his father's death, when the office of stadtholder was...
George III: Steven Parissien considers the reputation of one of the most controversial of British monarchs: the king who lost the American colonies, spent much of his life in psychological distress but whose active interest in the arts and sciences, and his generous patronage, distinguished him from his Hanoverian predecessors.
www.infoplease.com /ce6/people/A0852297.html   (395 words)

  
 Frederick William Iii Of Prussia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
Frederick William III, known in German as Friedrich Wilhelm III, reigned as king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840.
The son of King Frederick William II of Prussia, Frederick William was born in Potsdam on August 3, 1770, and became Crown Prince in 1786, when his father ascended the throne.
Frederick William came to the throne on November 16, 1797, on the death of his father.
www.wikiverse.org /frederick-william-iii-of-prussia   (477 words)

  
 William III of Orange
William III of Orange was governor of the Netherlands when an unexpected birth of an heir to the English throne (James III) brought about the threat of a permanent Catholic dynasty for England.
Whigs and Tories summoned William to the throne ('For the Protestant faith and a free parliament').
The Glorious Revolution (1688) followed, and William III became King of England.
www.hyperhistory.com /online_n2/people_n2/persons6_n2/william.html   (61 words)

  
 Britannia: Monarchs of Britain
William III (William of Orange), born in 1650, was the son of William, Prince of Orange, and Mary Stuart (daughter of Charles I).
William maintained a long-lasting affair with Elizabeth Villiers, one of Mary's ladies-in-waiting, which prompted Mary to be completely devoted and subservient to her husband.
William was reluctant to accept the throne by means of conquest, preferring to be named king by Parliament through birthright.
www.britannia.com /history/monarchs/mon51.html   (834 words)

  
 Who was Prince William III of Orange?
The story of King William III of Orange is one of religious differences, political maneuverings and of family conflict.
When William was 27 years old he married (14th November, 1677) a 15-year-old – Henrietta Mary Stuart – known as Mary, the daughter of James II (the heir-apparent and brother to the ruling Charles II of England).
William’s wife Mary had died of smallpox on December 28, 1694 and William was heartbroken.
wy.essortment.com /whowasprincew_rlbt.htm   (1542 words)

  
 William III - Encyclopedia.com
William III 1817-90, king of the Netherlands and grand duke of Luxembourg (1849-90), son and successor of William II.
William III ruled as a constitutional monarch, and his long reign was unmarred by friction with the States-General.
With William's death the male Dutch line of the house of Orange-Nassau became extinct.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Will3Neth.html   (395 words)

  
 William III, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland — FactMonster.com
William III, 1650–1702, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1689–1702); son of William II, prince of Orange, stadtholder of the United Provinces of the Netherlands, and of Mary, oldest daughter of King Charles I of England.
William's personality was cold and his public policy calculating, but he was an able soldier and an astute politician, and his reign was of momentous constitutional importance.
William III, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland: Early Life - Early Life He was born at The Hague after his father's death, when the office of stadtholder...
www.factmonster.com /ce6/people/A0852297.html   (198 words)

  
 William III - Metaweb   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-26)
This is an intermediate page for William III (of Orange).
His grandfather was William I of Orange, who led the Dutch forces to victory in the early stages of the Eighty Years War for Dutch independence.
On June 28, 1672 he was appointed to the office of Stadtholder in the Netherlands, as well as captain-general of the Dutch forces opposing the French invasion of the Third Anglo-Dutch War.
www.metaweb.com /wiki/wiki.phtml?title=William_III   (942 words)

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