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Topic: William III of England


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In the News (Mon 12 Nov 18)

  
  William III of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
William III was appointed to the Dutch post of Stadtholder on 28 June 1672, and remained in office until he died.
William of Orange, the son of William II, Prince of Orange and Mary Stuart, was born in The Hague.
William III felt insecure about his position; though only his wife was formally eligible to assume the throne, he wished to reign as King in his own right, rather than as a mere consort.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/William_III_of_England   (3957 words)

  
 William III (of England, Scotland, and Ireland) - MSN Encarta
William III (of England, Scotland, and Ireland), called William of Orange (1650-1702), King of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1689-1702), and stadtholder of the Netherlands (1672-1702), who helped form the Grand Alliance and led England in its so-called Glorious Revolution.
As a result of William's superior diplomacy, however, which also included the strengthening of ties with England by his marriage (1677) to the English princess Mary (eldest daughter of his uncle, James, Duke of York, later King James II), Louis XIV agreed to terminate the war on terms favourable to the Dutch.
William's reign continued to be marked by abortive Jacobite plots to restore James to the throne.
uk.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761572363/William_III_(of_England_Scotland_and_Ireland).html   (541 words)

  
 William III (of England) - MSN Encarta
William III (of England), called William of Orange (1650-1702), king of England (1689-1702), and stadtholder of the Netherlands (1672-1702), who helped form the Grand Alliance and led England in its so-called Glorious Revolution.
Born on November 14, 1650, in The Hague, Holland, William was the posthumous son of William II, prince of Orange and stadtholder of the Netherlands, and Mary, eldest daughter of the English king Charles I.
As a result of William’s superior diplomacy, however, which also included the strengthening of ties with England by his marriage (1677) to the English princess Mary (eldest daughter of his uncle, James, duke of York, later King James II), Louis XIV agreed to terminate the war on terms favorable to the Dutch.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761572363/William_III_(of_England).html   (553 words)

  
 William III, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
William, however, took an English army to the Spanish Netherlands in 1691 and was constantly involved in campaigning until the conclusion of peace by the Treaty of Ryswick (1697).
William and the Whigs were also responsible for the Toleration Act (1689), which lifted some of the disabilities imposed on Protestant nonconformists, and for allowing the Licensing Act to lapse (1695), a great step toward freedom of the press.
William sought to maintain royal prerogatives but was unable to prevent passage of the Triennial Act (1694), which required a new Parliament every three years, and the Act of Settlement (1701), which imposed the first statutory limitation on royal control of foreign policy.
www.bartleby.com /65/wi/Will3Eng.html   (706 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for William
William of Wykeham WILLIAM OF WYKEHAM [William of Wykeham] or William of Wickham, 1324-1404, English prelate and lord chancellor.
William the Lion WILLIAM THE LION [William the Lion] 1143-1214, king of Scotland (1165-1214), brother and successor of Malcolm IV.
1197, chancellor and justiciar of England, bishop of Ely.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=William&StartAt=11   (590 words)

  
 Pepys' Diary: William III of Orange
William III who was born in 1650 was the son of Mary, the eldest daughter of Charles I, and William II, the Stadtholder, who died shortly before his birth.
William’s fortunes changed in 1672 when De Witt, along with his brother were killed by a mob in The Hague for Dutch humiliation and practical annihilation at the hands of the French and English during the Second Dutch War of Charles II.
As Parliament was de facto the ruler of England, and William III had in the Netherlands more power than the stadholdership originally contained (a stadholder was a "servant" of the Provinces) it was said that he was king in the Netherlands an stadholder in England.
www.pepysdiary.com /p/781.php   (747 words)

  
 William III of Orange, King of England - Timeline Index   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Willem III, Prince of Orange, also known as King William III of England, Scotland, and Ireland, was a Prince of the House of Orange-Nassau and Dutch Stadtholder and (jointly with his wife Mary II until her death) King of England, Scotland, and Ireland (February 13, 1689 - March 8, 1702).
William 1 of Orange (Willem van Oranje), also known as William the Silent (Willem de Zwijger), was the leader of the Dutch war of independence from Spanish rule, known as...
William of Orange was leader of the Dutch, then in the early stages of a war with the French: the War of the Grand Alliance.
www.timelineindex.com /content/view/696   (482 words)

  
 Battle of the Boyne - Free net encyclopedia
Image:William III of England.jpg The Battle of the Boyne was a turning point in the Williamite war in Ireland between the deposed King James II of England and VII of Scotland and his son-in-law and successor, William, for the English, Scottish and Irish thrones.
The opposing armies in the battle were led by the Roman Catholic King James of England, Scotland and Ireland and opposing him, his son-in-law the Protestant William III ("William of Orange") who had deposed James from his English and Scottish thrones in the previous year.
William's second in command was the Duke of Schomberg, a 75-year-old professional soldier.
www.netipedia.com /index.php/Battle_of_the_Boyne   (2798 words)

  
 King William County History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
William and Mary were invited to England by seven leaders of the English political parties, the Tory and Whig, who were concerned about James' absolutist royal leanings, his inability to cooperate with Parliament and Catholic succession to the throne following the birth of a son to James in 1688.
The new monarchs were crowned King William III and Queen Mary II of England, Scotland and Ireland during a coronation in Westminster Abbey on April 11, 1689.
William's reign also transpired during the early years of the Enlightenment (also known as the Age of Enlightenment or the Age of Reason), an intellectual movement that originated in England in the seventeenth century, but then had widespread global influence.
www.co.king-william.va.us /history_tourism.htm   (4653 words)

  
 Britannia: Monarchs of Britain
William maintained a long-lasting affair with Elizabeth Villiers, one of Mary's ladies-in-waiting, which prompted Mary to be completely devoted and subservient to her husband.
William was considerably more concerned with his holdings and the Protestant-Catholic conflicts on the continent, leaving Mary behind in England to rule.
William and the English populace were conspicuously indifferent to each other, but Mary loved England and the English people loved her.
www.britannia.com /history/monarchs/mon51.html   (810 words)

  
 William III of England - British Royalty   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
In England, Scotland and Ireland, ruled jointly with his wife, Mary II, until her death on 28 December 1694.
William was appointed to the Dutch post of Stadtholder on 28 June 1672, and remained in office until he died.
William, the son of William II, Prince of Orange and Mary, Princess Royal and Princess of Orange, was born in The Hague.
www.webasyst.net /wbs/QP/html/scripts/book.php?DB_KEY=V0VCQVNZU1Q=&BookID=britishroyalty&PageID=william3   (468 words)

  
 William III of England - Free net encyclopedia
William III of England or William III of Orange, the son of William II, Prince of Orange and Mary Stuart, was born in The Hague.
England joined the League of Augsburg, which then became known as the "Grand Alliance." Whilst William was away fighting, his wife, Mary II, governed the realm for him, but acted on his advice.
Another important consequence of William's reign involved the ending of a bitter conflict between Crown and Parliament that had lasted since the accession of the first monarch of the House of Stuart, James I, in 1603.
www.netipedia.com /index.php/William_III_of_Orange   (3819 words)

  
 William of Orange
William of Orange is the name of several historical people, most of them are better known under the Dutch version of the name, Willem.
Willem III of Orange is better known as King William III of England, because he became king of England in 1688.
And grandson King Willem III of the Netherlands.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/wi/William_of_Orange.html   (138 words)

  
 BookRags: William, III Biography
William III (1650-1702), Prince of Orange, reigned as king of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 1689 to 1702.
William's domestic relations in England were intermittently strained because he understood little of the compromise required under the parliamentary system of broad-based consultation and administration.
William fostered the Toleration Act of 1689 and the establishment of the Bank of England to fund the war debt in 1694.
www.bookrags.com /biography/william-iii   (1011 words)

  
 glbtq >> social sciences >> William III, Prince of Orange, King of England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
William was born at the Hague in 1650, the posthumous son of William II, who died a few days before he was born, and Mary Stuart, daughter of the late King Charles I of England, who had been deposed by English Parliamentarians.
William was thus an important figure in European politics from the day of his birth, since he not only inherited his Dutch titles, but was fourth in line to inherit the British throne should it be restored.
William III acceded to the British throne when the English ousted James II in the "Glorious Revolution" of 1688.
www.glbtq.com /social-sciences/william_III.html   (858 words)

  
 1689 - Simple English Wikipedia
January 11 - The Parliament of England declares King James II of England deposed.
February 13 - William III and Mary II are proclaimed co-rulers of England, Scotland and Ireland.
April 11 - Crowning of co-rulers King William III and Mary II as King and Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland.
simple.wikipedia.org /wiki/1689   (278 words)

  
 Mary II of England - British Royalty
William was the son of her aunt, Mary, Princess Royal and Princess of Orange, and of Prince William II of Nassau.
At first, William was reluctant; he was jealous of his wife's position as the heiress to the English Crown, and feared that she would become more powerful than he was.
William agreed to invade; his intentions became public knowledge by September 1688, and the Dutch army landed on 5 November.
www.webasyst.net /wbs/QP/html/scripts/book.php?DB_KEY=V0VCQVNZU1Q=&BookID=britishroyalty&PageID=mary2   (757 words)

  
 History of King William III of England
WILLIAM and Mary were proclaimed King and Queen of the United Kingdom, and thus was consummated the English Revolution.
William Paterson, an ingenious speculator, submitted to the government a plan for a national bank, which, after long debate, passed both houses of parliament.
The war was ended by the signing of the treaty of Ryswick by the ambassadors of France, England, Spain and the United Provinces on September 20, 1697.
www.publicbookshelf.com /public_html/Outline_of_Great_Books_Volume_I/kingwilli_jd.html   (985 words)

  
 English Monarchs - Kings and Queens of England - William III and Mary.   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
William was distraught but remained at her bedside until the end.
As she lay dying, William was reported to have said that "from being the happiest" he was "now going to be the miserablest creature on earth." Queen Mary died aged only thirty-two on 28th December.
William, to whom she was irreplaceable, was prostrate with grief at her death.
www.englishmonarchs.co.uk /stuart_7.htm   (1171 words)

  
 WILLIAM III @ Archontology.org: presidents, kings, prime ministers, biography, database
William was the posthumous son of Willem II, Prince of Orange, and Henrietta Mary, daughter of the English king Charles I.
William III led the military campaign against James II in Ireland, which culminated in the Battle of the Boyne (1 Jul 1690) and the defeat of the former king.
After Louis XIV proclaimed James III, the son of James II, king of England in September 1701, William was about to wage another war against France, but died as a result of complications from a fall whilst riding at Hampton Court.
www.archontology.org /nations/england/king_grbritain/william3.php   (665 words)

  
 Royalty.nu - Royal History - The Stuarts - Queen Mary II and King William III
William and Mary became the new monarchs of the United Kingdom, reigning jointly.
William III, The Stadholder-King: A Political Biography by Wouter Troost, translated by J. Grayson.
William III and the Godly Revolution by Tony Claydon.
www.royalty.nu /Europe/England/Stuart/MaryII.html   (554 words)

  
 boys clothing: Dutch royalty stadtholder Wilem William II of Orange
William was succeeded by his son, the future William III of England, who was born after his death.
William was born in 1625 at The Hague.
William in 1641 at Whitehall Palace in London married Princess Royal Mary Henrietta, the eldest daughter of English King Charles I.
histclo.com /royal/net/royal-nsw2.htm   (767 words)

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