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Topic: William Juxon


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  WILLIAM JUXON - LoveToKnow Article on WILLIAM JUXON   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
In December 1621 he succeeded his friend, William Laud, as president of St Johns College, and in 1626 and 1627 he was vice-chancellor of the university.
Juxon soon obtained other important positions, including that of chaplain-in-ordinary to Charles I. In 1627 he was made dean of Worcester and in 1632 he was nominated to the bishopric of Hereford, an event which led him to resign the presidency of St Johns in January 1633.
Juxon was deprived of his bishopric in 1649 and retired to Little Compton in Gloucestershire, where he had bought an estate, and here he became famous as the owner of a pack of hounds.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /J/JU/JUXON_WILLIAM.htm   (986 words)

  
 William Juxon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
William Juxon (1582 June 4, 1663) was an English churchman, Bishop of London from 1633 to 1649 and Archbishop of Canterbury from 1660 until his death.
He was the son of Robert Juxon and was born probably at Chichester, and educated at Merchant Taylors' School, London, and St John's College, Oxford, where he was elected to a scholarship in 1598.
Juxon was deprived of his bishopric in 1649 and retired to Little Compton in Gloucestershire, where he had bought an estate, and became famous as the owner of a pack of hounds.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/William_Juxon   (377 words)

  
 William Laud - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
William Laud (October 7, 1573–January 10, 1645) was Archbishop of Canterbury and a fervent supporter of King Charles I of England, whom he encouraged to believe in divine right.
Laud was born in Reading, Berkshire, of comparatively low origins (a fact of which he was to remain sensitive throughout his career) and educated at Reading School and, through a White Scholarship, St.
In 1637, William Prynne and two others were sentenced to mutilation (removal of ears and branding on both cheeks) for the crime of seditious libel.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/William_Laud   (564 words)

  
 William Juxon -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Juxon soon obtained other important positions, including that of chaplain-in-ordinary to King (Son of James I who was King of England and Scotland and Ireland; was deposed and executed by Oliver Cromwell (1600-1649)) Charles I.
In 1627 he was made Dean of (A cathedral city in west central England on the River Severn) Worcester and in 1632 he was nominated to the bishopric of (Hardy English breed of dairy cattle raised extensively in United States) Hereford and resigned the presidency of St John's in January 1633.
Juxon was deprived of his bishopric in 1649 and retired to Little Compton in (A county in southwestern England in the lower Severn valley) Gloucestershire, where he had bought an estate, and became famous as the owner of a pack of hounds.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/w/wi/william_juxon.htm   (349 words)

  
 Bishop Juxon's Bible
Juxon retired, immediately after the execution, to his estate of Little Compton, which is about a mile distant from this place (Charlton Moreton-in-the-Marsh).
Bishop Juxon (in this neighbourhood he is never known by his title of Archbishop) retired at the time of the Commonwealth to his estate at Little Compton, a small village about a mile and half from my house.
Bishop Juxon died in 1663, at Lambeth and was succeeded in his estate by his nephew William, who had been created a baronet in 1661.
www.oldandsold.com /articles31n/gentslib-29.shtml   (719 words)

  
 Juxon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
William Juxon was the son of Robert Juxon and educated at Merchant Taylors' School, London, and St John's College, Oxford, where he studied law.
Juxon was deprived of his bishopric in 1649 and retired to Little Compton in Gloucestershire.
Juxon's name lives on in the form of Joxon Street, SE11 which was formerly known as Mill Street.
www.vauxhallsociety.org.uk /Juxon.html   (306 words)

  
 Juxon, William --  Encyclopædia Britannica
As lord high treasurer, Juxon was the last English clergyman to hold both secular and clerical offices in the medieval tradition of clerical state service.
With Meriwether Lewis, William Clark led the famous Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1804 to 1806 from St. Louis to the mouth of the Columbia River.
William Kirby was a Canadian writer who strongly supported the British Empire and Canada's continued inclusion in the empire.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9044235?tocId=9044235   (718 words)

  
 Jeremy Taylor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
He was under the patronage of William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury.
Archbishop William Laud sent for Taylor to preach before him at Lambeth, and took the young man under his special protection.
After two years in Oxford, he was presented, in March 1638, by William Juxon, bishop of London, to the rectory of Uppingham, in Rutlandshire.
www.pineville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Jeremy_Taylor   (2477 words)

  
 William Juxon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
William Juxon (1582 –; June 4, 1663) was an English churchman, Bishop of London from 1633 to
Civil War, the bishop, against whom no charges were brought in parliament, lived undisturbed at Fulham Palace, and his advice was often sought by the king, who had a very high opinion of him, and who selected him to be with him on the scaffold and to offer him the last rites before his execution.
Juxon was deprived of his bishopric in 1649 and retired to Little Compton in
en.efactory.pl /William_Juxon   (398 words)

  
 The Ancestors of Timothy D. Cook - Person Page 5
William Skidmore was born circa 1545 at Mayshill, Westerleigh, Gloucestershire, England.
Sir William Darcy was the son of Richard Darcy and Eleanor Scrope.
William Devenish was the son of Thomas Devenish and Anne Fawkes.
www.rangeweb.net /~hmscook/ances/ances-p/p5.htm   (1222 words)

  
 1582 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
In Italy, Poland, Portugal, and Spain October 4 of this year is followed directly by October 15, skipping over 10 days.
November 28 - In Stratford-upon-Avon, 18 year-old William Shakespeare and 26 year-old Anne Hathaway pay a 40-pound bond for their marriage license (Shakespeare would later become one of the greatest playwrights in history).
William Feilding, 1st Earl of Denbigh (died 1643)
www.bucyrus.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/1582   (402 words)

  
 Easy Encyclopedia - Online Encyclopedia. Knowledge is Power
Since Henry VIII broke with Rome, archbishops of Canterbury have been selected by the English (latterly British) monarch; at present, the choice is made in his or her name, but by the prime minister, from a shortlist of two selected by a committee of clergy and laity.
The current Archbishop of Canterbury, the 104th, is Dr Rowan Douglas Williams, previously Archbishop of Wales.
The first Archbishop of Canterbury was Saint Augustine of Canterbury, who arrived in Kent in 597, all Archbishops of Canterbury since have been referred to as occupying the Chair of St Augustine.
easyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/a/ar/archbishop_of_canterbury.html   (211 words)

  
 H-Net Review: Paul S. Seaver on The Journal of Thomas Juxon, 1644-1647
The Juxons were a large London family, not all of whom were Puritans -- Bishop William Juxon was a cousin -- and Thomas was to enter trading as a partner of an uncle.
Juxon suggests that the king welcomed the battle of Naseby as a chance to "try the Independents, who were most raw and inexperienced," and concludes that many "were not very well pleased with this victory.
Juxon's journal, housed at Dr. Williams Library, although not neglected, deserves to be more widely known and used, and historians now have it in an accessible and admirably edited form.
www.h-net.msu.edu /reviews/showrev.cgi?path=30949960844906   (838 words)

  
 William Juxon
William Juxon (1582 - June 4, 1663) was an English churchman, Bishop of London from 1633 to 1649 and Archbishop of Canterbury from 1660 until his death.
In March 1636 Charles I entrusted Juxon with important secular duties by making him Lord High Treasurer of England; for the next five years he had to deal with many financial and other difficulties.
Serving God and Mammon: William Juxon, 1582-1663 by Thomas Mason ISBN 0874132517
www.starrepublic.org /encyclopedia/wikipedia/w/wi/william_juxon.html   (358 words)

  
 V&A - Juxon Chair
Two family traditions have linked the chair with William Juxon who, as Bishop of London, attended Charles I on the scaffold at his execution in 1649 and was present at the coronation of Charles II.
It was indisputable that the chair belonged to William Juxon as it had been passed down through his family but it was not clear as to whether either of the two family stories held any truth.
The second story relates that the chair has a connection with another Charles; this time Charles II at whose coronation in 1661 Juxon was present, as Archbishop of Canterbury, and that it was after this occasion that Juxon took the chair home.
www.vam.ac.uk /collections/furniture/object_stories/juxon   (455 words)

  
 Re: Juxons in England
There was a John Juxon, of London, Merchant Taylor, & Sugar Baker, who bequeathed to William Juxon of the Parish of martin hundred in Virginia planter 20 pounds.
William gave a letter of attorney to Thomas Juxon, citizen and merchant of London to receive on his behalf the legacy.
They were related to Bishop William Juxon, as was the John Juxon of Albourne who had a son William that was his heir as well as the heir of his Uncle the Archbishop William Juxon.
genforum.genealogy.com /juxon/messages/3.html   (199 words)

  
 Charles I: personal rule
William Laud believed that under George Abbot's lax rule the Church of England had surrendered all its rights to laymen without a fight.
In 1634, William Prynne, a puritan lawyer was fined and had the top of his ears cut off for a pamphlet against stage plays entitled Histriomastix.
In 1637, William Prynne was in trouble again; this time for attacking the bishops.
faculty.history.wisc.edu /sommerville/361/361-25.htm   (2166 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
It was from the hands of Bishop Juxon that King Charles received the Sacrament of Holy Communion before his execution.
Following the beheading of the King, Juxon was prohibited from using the burial service of the Book of Common Prayer by the new Puritan government, and he respectfully declined to make any remarks during the burial.
At the Restoration of the Monarchy and the Episcopate in 1660 Juxon was made Archbishop of Canterbury.
www.toledofamily.com /FamilyTree/npr33.html   (288 words)

  
 1663 . Royal Charter . February 12 . William Juxon . December 17 . 1663 in literature
William Juxon 1582 – June 4, 1663 was an England English churchman, Bishop of London from 1633 to 1649 and Archbishop of Canterbury from 1660 until his death.
He was the son of Robert Juxon and was born probably at Chichester, and educated at Merchant Taylors School, London, and St John s College, Oxford, where he was elected to a scholarship in 1598.
He studied law at Oxford, but afterwards took holy orders, and in 1609 became vicar of St Giles, Oxford, where he stayed until he became rector of Somerton, Oxfordshire, in...
www.uk.knowledge-info.org /1663   (201 words)

  
 First Davis & Hilton Ancestors in America   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
Charles II crowned King of England and Scotland at Westminster Abbey by William Juxon, Archbishop of Canterbury.
William III and Mary II proclaimed King and Queen of England, Scotland, and Ireland.
William III and Mary II crowned King and Queen of England, Scotland, and Ireland at Westminster Abbey by Henry Compton, Bishop of London.
kerrysdavis.home.comcast.net /tl4.htm   (448 words)

  
 LongShot - DON'T FORGET THE ECCLESIASTICAL COURTS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
The case was judged by Richard Juxon, father of William Juxon, who comforted Charles I at his execution and became Archbishop of Canterbury under Charles II.
Richard Linfield was either the son or grandson of William Lyndfeilde, husbandman of Nuthurst who died in 1578.
In 1621, he is summoned (WSRO Ep III 4/10 f105) with William White to reply to Master John Lellipott, Sequestrator of the tithes of St. Andrews.
www.longweb.f9.co.uk /longshot/vol4-no1-2.htm   (1635 words)

  
 Laud, William --  Britannica Concise Encyclopedia - The online encyclopedia you can trust!
He attacked the Puritan practice of preaching as dangerous, and he had Puritan writers such as William Prynne mutilated and imprisoned.
Aided by his close ally the 1st earl of Strafford, Thomas Wentworth, Laud used his influence over the king to influence government social policy.
It rejected the attempt by King Charles I and William Laud, archbishop of Canterbury, to force the Scottish church to conform to English liturgical practice and church governance.
www.britannica.com /ebc/article-9369813?tocId=9369813   (863 words)

  
 Archbishop William Laud 1573-1645
Sir Francis Windebank was appointed Secretary of State in 1632 and William Juxon, Bishop of London, was appointed Lord High Treasurer in 1636.
In 1637, the religious radicals William Prynne, Henry Burton and John Bastwick were tortured and imprisoned for speaking and writing against Laud's policy, which succeeded in making them into Puritan martyrs.
The prosecution was led by William Prynne, whom Laud had persecuted in 1637.
www.british-civil-wars.co.uk /biog/laud.htm   (848 words)

  
 JUXON, WILLIAM (1582-1663) - Online Information article about JUXON, WILLIAM (1582-1663)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-08)
WILLIAM (A.S. Wilhelm, O. Norse Vilhidlmr; O. Ger.
Juxon was deprived of his bishopric in 1649 and retired to Little See also:
Memoirs of Archbishop Juxon and his Times (1869); the best authority for the archbishop's See also:
encyclopedia.jrank.org /JUN_KHA/JUXON_WILLIAM_1582_1663_.html   (1291 words)

  
 Archbishop of Canterbury - OrthodoxWiki
The current Archbishop of Canterbury is the Right Honorable and Most Reverend Rowan Williams, 104th successor to the Chair of St. Augustine of Canterbury.
Rowan Douglas Williams was born in Wales on June 14, 1950.
In 2002 he was elevated to the throne of St. Augustine.
orthodoxwiki.org /Archbishop_of_Canterbury   (535 words)

  
 Bonavista Bay Heritage Site
Some of the settlers names mentioned for that first year were: William Chatchmaid William Colston Later returned to Bristol.
William Stone died April 13, 1611 of laziness according to Gov. Guy.
Vaughen George Wattes William Chief Carpenter, died Mar 11, 1613.
www.geocities.com /Athens/Aegean/8173/1610cupids.html   (740 words)

  
 intro
Bellamy (born in 16º4) matriculated from that college in November 1621, was admitted to the B. in April 1625, received the M. in 1629, and the B. in 1637 (I do not know if he remained in residence after 1629).
Certainly, the occasionally awkward language in which Iphis is written, sometimes stilted, murky, and occasionally difficult to understand in detail, does nothing to discourage the impression that it may be the work of an undergraduate.
Certainly this is true of Telethusa, who suffers and schemes with genuine intensity, and of her husband Lygdus, driven by his murderously irrational idée fixe.
www.philological.bham.ac.uk /iphis/intro.html   (2134 words)

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