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Topic: William Laud


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In the News (Fri 22 Mar 19)

  
  William Laud - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
William Laud (October 7, 1573–January 10, 1645) was Archbishop of Canterbury and a fervent supporter of King Charles I of England, whom he encouraged to believe in divine right.
Laud was born in Reading, Berkshire, of comparatively low origins (a fact of which he was to remain sensitive throughout his career) and educated at Reading School and, through a White Scholarship, St.
Laud was a sincere Anglican and loyal Englishman, who must have been frustrated at the charges of Popery levelled against him by the Puritan element in the Church.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/William_Laud   (563 words)

  
 WILLIAM LAUD - LoveToKnow Article on WILLIAM LAUD   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In 1611, in spite of the influence of Archbishop Abbot and Lord Chancellor Ellesmere, Laud was made president of St John's, and in 1614 obtained in addition the prebend of Buckden, in 1615 the archdeaconry of Huntingdon, and in 1616 the deanery of Gloucester.
In April 1622 Laud, by the kings orders, took part in a controversy with Percy, a Jesuit, known as Fisher, the aim of which was to prevent the conversion of the countess of Buckingham, the favorites mother, to Romanism, and his opinions expressed on that occasion show considerable breadth and comprehension.
Lauds infatuated policy could go no further, and the etcetera oath, according to which whole classes of men were to be forced to swear perpetual allegiance to the government of this church by archbishops, bishops, deans and archdeacons, andc., was long remembered and derided.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /L/LA/LAUD_WILLIAM.htm   (1703 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - William Laud (Protestant Christianity, Biography) - Encyclopedia
Laud thought of the English church as a branch of the universal church, claimed apostolic succession for the bishops, and believed that the Anglican ritual should be strictly followed in all churches.
In 1633, Laud became archbishop of Canterbury and continued on a larger scale his efforts to enforce High Church forms of worship.
Supporting Charles and the earl of Strafford to the end, Laud was impeached (1640) by the Long Parliament.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/L/Laud-Wil.html   (377 words)

  
 William Prynne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
William Prynne (1600 - October 24, 1669) was a Puritan opponent of the church policy of Archbishop of Canterbury William Laud.
He was, however, able to continue his activities from prison, and was sentenced in 1637 to the removal of the rest of his ears and to be branded with letters S L (seditious libeller).
He was able to have the satisfaction of overseeing the trial of Laud, which eventually ended in the latter's execution.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/William_Prynne   (324 words)

  
 Archbishop William Laud 1573-1645
Ordained as a priest in 1601, Laud was ambitious and rose quickly through the hierarchy of the Church principally through the patronage of Richard Neile, Bishop of Rochester, through whom he was introduced into the court of King James I. In 1617, Laud accompanied the King on a visit to Scotland as one his chaplains.
Laud's love of ceremony and harmonious liturgy — the "beauty of holiness" — was shared by King Charles, but it was loathed by Puritans, who regarded Laud's Arminianism as dangerously close to Roman Catholicism.
Laud was accused of assuming tyrannical powers in Church and State, of subverting the true religion with popish superstition and of causing the recent disastrous wars against the Scots.
www.british-civil-wars.co.uk /biog/laud.htm   (848 words)

  
 Desi Hot OR Hot   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
William Laud (October 7 1573 – January 10, 1645) was Archbishop of Canterbury and a fervent supporter of Charles I of England whom he encouraged to believe in the Divine Right of Kings.
Laud was born in Reading, Berkshire, of comparatively low origins (a fact he was to remain sensitive of through his career) and educated at Reading School and, through a White Scholarship, St.
The parliament took up the issue, and eventually passed a Bill of attainder under which he was beheaded on January 10, 1645 on Tower Hill, notwithstanding being granted a Royal pardon.
www.desihotornot.com /encyclopedia/index.php?title=William_Laud   (563 words)

  
 Book Encyclopedia - Web Library   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
William Juxon (1582 – June 4, 1663) was an English churchman, Bishop of London from 1633 to 1649 and Archbishop of Canterbury from 1660 until his death.
He was the son of Robert Juxon and was born probably at Chichester, and educated at Merchant Taylors' School, London, and St John's College, Oxford, where he was elected to a scholarship in 1598.
In 1627 he was made Dean of Worcester and in 1632 he was nominated to the bishopric of Hereford and resigned the presidency of St John's in January 1633.
www.bookencyclopedia.com /index.php?title=William_Juxon   (364 words)

  
 Jeremy Taylor - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
He was under the patronage of William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury.
This made him politically suspect when Laud was tried for treason and executed by the Puritan Parliament during the years preceding the English Civil War.
Archbishop William Laud sent for Taylor to preach before him at Lambeth, and took the young man under his special protection.
www.pineville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Jeremy_Taylor   (2477 words)

  
 William Laud
William Laud, born in 1573, was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1633 to 1645 in the days of King Charles I. It was a turbulent time throughout, one of violent divisions in the Church of England, eventually culminating in the English Civil War.
Archbishop Laud regarded it as a seemly, dignified, garment, an appropriate response to the Apostle Paul's injunction, "Let all things be done decently and in order." The Puritans stood by their objections, and violently interrupted services at which the surplice was worn.
Laud was also the prosecutor of record in the trials of those who published seditious or violent and abusive attacks on the doctrine and discipline of the Church, and the Puritans produced an abundance of scurrilous attacks on those who disagreed with them, which were duly punished, with Laud taking the responsibility.
www.satucket.com /lectionary/William_Laud.htm   (758 words)

  
 Britannia Biographies: William Laud Part 2
Laud's father, William Laud Senior, was a master cloth-worker and is described as having been well to do in the World.
Laud Senior's son, named William after him, was his only child; but his wife had been married before to another Reading clothier, John Robinson, by whom she had had a family.
It is possible that these relations of Laud's may have prospered the better in the World for their connection with him; but his uncle, at least, the Lord Mayor, had made his way to eminence long before the great churchman had got upon the ladder of preferment.
www.britannia.com /bios/wmlaud/family.html   (335 words)

  
 William Laud
William Laud lived much of his life in the days of King Charles I. It was a turbulent time throughout, one of violent divisions in the Church of England, eventually culminating in the English Civil War.
In 1611, however, Laud was appointed President of St John's despite opposition from the Calvinists, who maintained that there had been irregularities in his election.
Archbishop Laud regarded it as a seemly, dignified garment, an appropriate response to the Apostle Paul's injunction, "Let all things be done decently and in order." The Calvinists stood by their objections, and violently interrupted services at which the surplice was worn.
www.manotick.org /stjames/Archival_pages/william_laud.htm   (832 words)

  
 January 10: William Laud executed for persecuting Puritans
Laud was born in 1573, twenty-eight years after King Henry VIII broke from the Roman Catholic church because it would not give him a divorce.
Laud was a detail man. Charles trusted his work and liked Laud's theory that kings have divine right to rule and should be obeyed in everything.
When Laud was brought to the scaffold, he preached, taking as his text Hebrews 12:2, "Let us run with patience the race that is set before us." He forgave his enemies and asked their forgiveness.
chi.gospelcom.net /DAILYF/2001/01/daily-01-10-2001.shtml   (802 words)

  
 Charles I: personal rule
William Laud believed that under George Abbot's lax rule the Church of England had surrendered all its rights to laymen without a fight.
Laud alienated still more Englishmen by his policy of ordering all churches to rail in the communion table at the east end of the church and rename it an altar.
Laud himself was widely regarded as a crypto-Catholic, plotting to return England to papal obedience.
history.wisc.edu /sommerville/361/361-25.htm   (2166 words)

  
 §17. William Laud. VI. Caroline Divines. Vol. 7. Cavalier and Puritan. The Cambridge History of English and ...
Laud was the disciple of Andrewes, whom he regarded as his master in theology and the “light of the Christian world.” He preached Donne’s funeral sermon.
The church, whether at Rome or in London, is the same church—“one in substance but not one in condition of state and purity.” Rome has no ground of infallibility or universality: the eastern church as well as the reformation is a standing refutation of such an assertion.
Laud declares England’s adherence to the creeds and the fundamental unaltered doctrines of the church.
www.bartleby.com /217/0617.html   (489 words)

  
 Berkshire History: William Laud (1573-1645), Part 7
In the next year, 1622, Laud obtained much reputation by a conference or disputation which he maintained on 24th May in the presence of his Majesty and other distinguished personages, with Fisher the Jesuit.
However, both at this public conference at which the Countess and the Marquis were present, and in private discourse with the lady, Laud acquitted himself so ably as to satisfy her upon every point of religious question.
In January 1623, Laud was inducted into the parsonage of Creeke in the Diocese of Peterborough which he was permitted to hold in commendam with his not very well endowed Welsh bishopric.
www.berkshirehistory.com /bios/wmlaud/buckingham.html   (735 words)

  
 William Laud: Archbishop of Canterbury and Martyr
What Laud did was to hold a court to try the offence, as was proper, and after it had been properly condemned by authority, then to come down and embrace the offender, and propose to forgive and forget.
Laud was vilely slandered and infamously abused during all his career as a statesman.
Laud was just the sort of man who in a "prohibition State," like Maine, would try to force the prohibitory law in summer hotels and among gentlemen, as well as in back streets and piggeries.
anglicanhistory.org /usa/gts/laud1912.html   (9301 words)

  
 William Laud Biography / Biography of William Laud Biography Biography
The English prelate William Laud (1573-1645) was archbishop of Canterbury and architect of Charles I's personal government.
William Laud was the son of a Reading clothier.
Laud subscribed in theory to Arminian tolerance of doctrinal differences, but in action he was a believer in rigid enforcement of outward uniformity in worship, and he found strength in institutional authority.
www.bookrags.com /biography-william-laud   (225 words)

  
 January 10th
The name of Laud does not savour agreeably in the minds of Englishmen; yet it will be generally admitted that he was unjustly and vindicively treated.
Prynne, the barrister, who was Laud's personal enemy, collected evidence against him, seized his private papers, and even his prayer-book, and took his Diary by force out of his pocket.
We suspect this to have been William Drummond, the poet, who was just at this time returning from his legal studies at Paris, and would probably be passing through London on his way homewards; but we only can speak by conjecture.
www.thebookofdays.com /months/jan/10.htm   (2770 words)

  
 ninemsn Encarta - Search Results - Laud William
Laud, William (1573-1645), English prelate, born in Reading, and educated at the University of Oxford.
The new learning of the Renaissance greatly influenced Oxford from the late 15th century onward.
Among university scholars of the period were William...
au.encarta.msn.com /Laud_William.html   (95 words)

  
 [No title]
Archbishop Laud regarded it as a seemly, dignified, garment, an appropriate response to the Apostle Paul's injunction, "Let all things be done decently and in order." The Puritans stood by t heir objections, and violently interrupted services at which the surplice was worn.
\par Laud was also the prosecutor of record in the trials of those who published seditious or violent and abusive attacks on the doctrine and discipline of the Church, and the Puritans produced an abundance of scurrilous attacks on those who disagreed with them, which were duly punished, with Laud taking the responsibility.
In 1630 (before Laud became Archbishop), when Alexander Leighton published {\ul Zion's Pleas Against Prelacy}, a violent attack on the Bishops as tools of Antichrist, he was sentenced to be publicl y whipped and branded, and to have his ears cut off.
oplnk.net /~ajackson/efm_class/c3-30.rtf   (1368 words)

  
 Peter Heylin (or Heylyn)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In his early years he made a name for himself as a writer on geography and history, but later he was best known as a defender of royal power and of the ecclesiastical policies of Archbishop William Laud, whose biographer he was.
During the 1630s he pursued a number of pro-Laudian activities, attacking the Puritan feoffees for impropriations, aiding in the proceedings against Prynne, writing against Puritans on the Sabbath, and defending Laud’s ceremonial policy against the criticisms of Bishop John Williams.
In England, Laud strove heroically to combat the spread of Calvinist and Presbyterian ideas, and to reverse the evil effects of the Reformation by restoring the Church to its old prestige.
www.thoemmes.com /encyclopedia/heylin.htm   (1333 words)

  
 William Laud   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
William Laud, the son of a prosperous merchant, was born in Reading in 1573.
Laud also upset the Puritans (Presbyterians) in Scotland when he insisted they had to use the English Prayer Book.
Laud was arrested and sent to the Tower of London.
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk /STUlaud.htm   (540 words)

  
 William Laud
As Archbishop, Laud was obliged to punish offences against the Church and he made it his policy to proceed not only against the poor but also against the rich and powerful.
Laud's movement for Church reform spread to Scotland when King Charles tried to force a new Prayer Book on them to bring them in line with the English...which led to riots and ultimately to resistance by the Scottish National Covenant...and the Bishops' Wars.
Then parliament passed a bill of attainder declaring Laud to be guilty of treason which they forced the Lords to pass.
www.thevickerage.worldonline.co.uk /ecivil/william_laud.htm   (343 words)

  
 William Laud   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
William Laud, born in 1573, became Archbishop of Canterbury in 1633, having been Charles the First’s principal ecclesiastical adviser for several years before.
Laud believed the Church of England to be a direct continuity with the medieval Church, and he stressed the unity of Church and State, exalting the role of the king as the supreme governor.
As head of the courts of High Commission and Star Chamber, Laud was abhorred for the harsh sentencing of prominent Puritans.
www.geocities.com /episcopal23/laud.html   (362 words)

  
 Early Stuart Libels: Miscellaneous (1628-1640)
William Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury, was troubled by libels throughout much of his turbulent career, and his letters and speeches offer some of the most striking testimony on the effect of such works.
For instance, some of Laud’s most troubling critics were situated in provincial centres, and were focused on disputes that were primarily (though not entirely) local in character.
Laud’s speech in the Star Chamber trial of Bastwick, Burton and Prynne, printed at the “commaund” of the King (Laud, Speech t.p.), is here pilloried, in an act that is at once pointed in its intent and demotic in its intended audience.
www.earlystuartlibels.net /htdocs/misc_section/R0.html   (915 words)

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