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Topic: William Lyon Mackenzie


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  William Lyon Mackenzie - LoveToKnow 1911
WILLIAM LYON MACKENZIE (1795-1861), Canadian politician, his father died before he was a month old, and the family were left in poverty.
In November 1824 Mackenzie removed to Toronto, but he had little capital; his paper appeared irregularly, and was on the point of suspending publication when his office was attacked.
Early in December 1837 Mackenzie gathered a mob of his followers, to the number of several hundred, at Gallows Hill, some miles to the north of Toronto, with the intention of seizing the lieutenant-governor and setting up a provisional government.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /William_Lyon_Mackenzie   (1100 words)

  
 William Lyon Mackenzie - Search Results - MSN Encarta
William Lyon Mackenzie (March 12, 1795 August 28, 1861) was a Canadian journalist, politician, and leader of an unsuccessful rebellion.
Mackenzie was born in Dundee, Scotland and immigrated to Upper...
William Lyon Mackenzie King, OM, PC, LL.B, Ph.D, MA, BA (December 17, 1874 – July 22, 1950) was the tenth Prime Minister of Canada from December 29, 1921, to June 28, 1926; September 25, 1926, to...
ca.encarta.msn.com /William_Lyon_Mackenzie.html   (190 words)

  
 Canadian History - William Lyon Mackenzie
Mackenzie and some prominent members of the official party, led, in 1826, to the violent destruction of the printing office by a mob of irritated friends of the ruling party.
Mackenzie was elected to the Canadian Parliament, for the County of York.
Mackenzie had, in his newspaper, used language towards the majority in the Assembly, which that majority chose to regard as libellous, and they resolved to punish the representative for the act of the journalist.
www.electricscotland.com /history/canada/mackenzie_williamlyon.htm   (877 words)

  
 Early Canada Historical Narratives -- WILLIAM LYON MACKENZIE, PART 1
William Lyon Mackenzie King turned the golden key in the lock and slowly opened the front door of his grandfather's renovated and revered home.
Mackenzie was five feet six inches in height, had a gaunt face and a massive head which appeared too big for his body.
Mackenzie's mother arrived in the summer of 1822 with a wife in toe for Willie.
www.uppercanadahistory.ca /tt/tt4.html   (1540 words)

  
 William Lyon Mackenzie King
The Right Honourable William Lyon Mackenzie King (December 17, 1874 - July 22, 1950) was the tenth Prime Minister of Canada from December 29, 1921 to June 28, 1926 September 25, 1926 to August 7, 1930, and October 23, 1935 to November 15, 1948.
He obtained three from the University of Toronto: B.A., and M.A. After studying at the University of Chicago, Mackenzie King proceeded to Harvard, receiving an M.A. Political Economy degree 1898 and a Ph.D. He led the Liberal Party from 1919-1948 and was the longest serving Prime Minister of Canada.
Mackenzie King was a cautious politician who tailored his policies to prevailing opinions.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/wi/William_Lyon_Mackenzie_King.html   (263 words)

  
 Mackenzie, William Lyon
Mackenzie, William Lyon, journalist, politician (b at Dundee, Scot 12 Mar 1795; d at Toronto 28 Aug 1861).
Mackenzie, as journalist, MLA, first mayor of TORONTO and a leader of the REBELLIONS OF 1837, was a central figure in pre-Confederation political life.
Moreover, Mackenzie's venomous attacks on the local oligarchy brought reprisals in the form of libel suits, threats and physical assaults, as well as an attack on his printing office, which left his press wrecked and the type thrown into the lake.
www.canadianencyclopedia.ca /PrinterFriendly.cfm?Params=A1ARTA0004947   (567 words)

  
 William Lyon Mackenzie - Canadian Confederation
William Lyon Mackenzie's political impact is important in studying Upper Canada's reform movement and the significance of the reformers in the years before Confederation in 1867.
Mackenzie was elected to the legislature for the first time in 1828, representing York.
Mackenzie led the Rebellion of 1837 in Upper Canada, fighting the oligarchy of the Family Compact.
www.collectionscanada.ca /confederation/023001-2361-e.html   (248 words)

  
 William Lyon Mackenzie Biography
William Lyon Mackenzie (March 12, 1795—August 28, 1861) was a Canadian journalist and rebel.
Mackenzie was born in Scotland and immigrated to Upper Canada in 1820.
William Lyon Mackenzie was the grandfather of William Lyon Mackenzie King.
www.biographybase.com /biography/Mackenzie_William_Lyon.html   (234 words)

  
 William Lyon Mackenzie Summary
Mackenzie was the driving force in compiling the "Seventh Report of the Committee on Grievances," issued in 1835, which detailed the reform case in the province.
William Lyon Mackenzie (March 12, 1795 – August 28, 1861) was a Canadian journalist, politician and leader of an unsuccessful rebellion.
Mackenzie was born in Dundee, Scotland and immigrated to Upper Canada in 1820.
www.bookrags.com /William_Lyon_Mackenzie   (938 words)

  
 Mackenzie, William Lyon
Mackenzie, William Lyon, journalist, politician (b at Dundee, Scot 12 Mar 1795; d at Toronto 28 Aug 1861).
Mackenzie, as journalist, MLA, first mayor of TORONTO and a leader of the REBELLIONS OF 1837, was a central figure in pre-Confederation political life.
Mackenzie arrived in UPPER CANADA in 1820 and, after a few years in business at Dundas, moved to QUEENSTON.
thecanadianencyclopedia.com /index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0004947   (180 words)

  
 King, William Lyon Mackenzie
King, William Lyon Mackenzie, politician, prime minister of Canada 1921-26, 1926-30 and 1935-48 (b at Berlin [Kitchener], Ont 17 Dec 1874; d at Ottawa 22 July 1950), grandson of William Lyon MACKENZIE.
He set out to regain the confidence of the farmers in Ontario and western Canada who had supported the new PROGRESSIVE PARTY, but his reductions in tariffs and freight rates were not enough, and after the 1925 election the Liberals could stay in office only with Progressive support.
During the first session of the new Parliament, when it was clear this support would be withdrawn because of a scandal in the Department of Customs, King asked Governor General Viscount BYNG for a dissolution.
www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com /index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0004312   (1076 words)

  
 Wikinfo | William Lyon Mackenzie King
William Lyon Mackenzie King (December 17, 1874 - July 22, 1950) was the tenth Prime Minister of Canada from December 29, 1921 to June 28, 1926, September 25, 1926 to August 7, 1930, and October 23, 1935 to November 15, 1948.
A grandson of William Lyon Mackenzie, leader of the Upper Canada Rebellion in 1837, King held five university degrees.
Mackenzie King won the election of 1945, and began to introduce social programs such as unemployment insurance and universal health care.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=William_Lyon_Mackenzie_King   (1029 words)

  
 Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online
Mackenzie was partly at fault for sending copies to many influential non-subscribers, a parallel to his habit of writing to anyone of consequence.
Mackenzie, like Jackson, whom he met, was an entrepreneurial radical who strongly supported the independent proprietor and farmer but was hardly an agent for the common man. He returned to York filled with admiration of the United States and its institutions, an attitude soon supplemented by a growing dislike of Great Britain.
Mackenzie’s new attitude was symbolized by the disappearance of “Colonial” from the title of his newspaper on 5 Dec. 1833.
www.biographi.ca /EN/ShowBio.asp?BioId=38684   (10512 words)

  
 Early Canada Historical Narratives -- WILLIAM LYON MACKENZIE, PART 2
William was a passionate person who inherited his fervent nature naturally from his fiery forebears.
Mackenzie was slight, wiry and perpetually in motion.
Mackenzie's Rebellion, which could have been the clarion call to a great popular movement for a proud people, was instead a dismal fiasco.
www.uppercanadahistory.ca /tt/tt5.html   (3253 words)

  
 William Lyon Mackenzie
A story told of Mackenzie is that on June 8, 1825, 15 young men from wealthy, well-known families of York (now Toronto) smashed their way into offices of The Colonial Advocate and threw printing equipment into the street.
Mackenzie was first elected to the Legislative Assembly in 1828.
Mackenzie was expelled from the Legislative Assembly a total of six times and each time the people re-elected him.
www.angelfire.com /ab7/cam7/wlm.html   (312 words)

  
 CM Magazine: William Lyon Mackenzie King: Dreams and Shadows. (Quest Library)
In the case of William Lyon Mackenzie King: Dreams and Shadows, extracts from Mackenzie King's diaries and letters are very nicely woven into a series of vignettes that trace his life from childhood to death.
Like the other books in the series, this one is generously illustrated and includes both a comprehensive bibliography (evidence of careful research, as well a source for further study), and a Chronology, in which the various events of the subject's life are paralleled by significant events in the larger national and international contexts.
William Lyon Mackenzie King was one of the stranger and yet most significant of Canada's political figures.
www.umanitoba.ca /outreach/cm/vol10/no4/williamlyonmackenzieking.html   (754 words)

  
 William Lyon Mackenzie: Rochester Newspaper Man
Mackenzie, at the end of a third attempt (an abortive invasion from Watertown), felt with justice that his cause needed a newspaper.
William Lyon Mackenzie felt it his duty to publish this scandalous discovery for the benefit of the public good.
Mackenzie never quite forgave Van Buren for his eleven months in the Monroe County jail, and the biography while not scurrilous was not intended to be flattering.
www.lib.rochester.edu /index.cfm?PAGE=3372   (3004 words)

  
 William Lyon Mackenzie
Mackenzie emigrated to Canada, where he was made superintendent of the works of the Lachine canal, and afterward opened a drug and book store at Little York (now Toronto), in partnership with John Lesslie.
Mackenzie in his paper, made him more popular than before, and the large damages he received as a compensation for the outrage enabled him to continue more successfully than ever his appeals for reform in the government, and his denunciations of the official classes.
Here they were ***recuffreed by 500 American sympathizers, and Mackenzie established a provisional government, offering by proclamation, in the name of the new government, 300 acres of land and $100 to all volunteers to the army on Navy island, and a reward of £500 for the apprehension of Sir Francis Head, the governor-general.
famousamericans.net /williamlyonmackenzie   (1328 words)

  
 Pastyme With Good Companye - Post details: William Lyon Mackenzie
William Lyon Mackenzie was born in 1795 in Dundee, Scotland and emigrated to Canada in 1820 where, without a doubt, he left an indelible mark.
Mackenzie busted the chops in his press about these "upstarts", reminding them that "back in dear old England", they were not the hoity-toity folks they made themselves out to be...
Mackenzie was basically trying to "stand his ground" (really meaning instant beatings from the group) but Fitzgibbon literally used his sheer presence to walk through the crowds and, kicking and screaming, drag Mackenzie to the safety of the town jail.
doubledeckerbuses.org /pastyme/index.php?title=william_lyon_mackenzie&more=1&c=1&tb=1&pb=1   (2420 words)

  
 William Lyon Mackenzie
William Lyon Mackenzie was born in Dundee, Scotland.
In reaction to Mackenzie's broadsides his printing presses were trashed in the so-called "types riots" of June 8,1826, carried out by young supporters of the Compact including students at law in the offices of the Attorney General.
Mackenzie was not an advocate of responsible government.
www.visitdunkeld.com /william-mackenzie.htm   (444 words)

  
 William Lyon Mackenzie King - Biography and Photo
William Lyon Mackenzie King was a member of the Liberal Party of Canada.
William Lyon Mackenzie King, PC, LL.B, Ph.D, MA, BA (December 17, 1874 — July 22, 1950) was the tenth Prime Minister of Canada from December 29, 1921, to June 28, 1926; September 25, 1926, to August 7, 1930; and October 23, 1935, to November 15, 1948.
(Mackenzie was one of his given names, not part of his surname.) In his public career he was never referred to as simply "William King".
www.canadiancontent.net /people/politics/William-Lyon-Mackenzie-King.html   (557 words)

  
 William Lyon Mackenzie King
Mackenzie King was considered to be this rather than a statesman.
Mackenzie King once cancelled this type of meeting to care for his sick dog.
Mackenzie King once concluded this dictator was a "mystic".
www.cpac.ca /crossword/ans_king_eng.html   (161 words)

  
 William Lyon Mackenzie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
William Lyon Mackenzie (March 12, 1795 – August 28, 1861) was a Canadian journalist, politician, and leader of an unsuccessful rebellion.
Mackenzie was born in Dundee, Scotland and immigrated to Upper Canada in 1820.
Fittingly it is named William Lyon Mackenzie Collegiate Institute.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/William_Lyon_Mackenzie   (344 words)

  
 William Lyon Mackenzie
William Lyon Mackenzie (March 12, 1795- August 28, 1861), Canadian journalist, reformer, and leader of the Rebellion of 1837.
Embittered by the defeat of his Reform Party in 1836, Mackenzie became an advocate of open rebellion (there are some serious questions on how that "free" elections were conducted).
Mackenzie was arrested and sentenced to 18 months in prison for violation of the neutrality laws.
www.sg-chem.net /UC1838/Mackenzie.htm   (216 words)

  
 Mackenzie, William Lyon. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Enraged by the policies of Sir Francis Bond Head and by the defeat of the Reform party, Mackenzie and a group of insurgents attempted (1837) to seize Toronto, but the rebellion was quickly put down.
He set up a provisional government with fortified headquarters on Navy Island in the Niagara River, but he was later imprisoned for 18 months by the U.S. authorities for violating the neutrality laws (see Caroline Affair).
After his release Mackenzie worked as a journalist and writer until the proclamation of general amnesty allowed his return (1849) to Canada.
www.bartleby.com /65/ma/MackenzWL.html   (297 words)

  
 City of Toronto: Toronto history, biography - William Lyon MacKenzie
William Lyon MacKenzie arrived from Scotland in Upper Canada in 1820.
MacKenzie was elected to the House of Assembly for the York riding and was kicked out numerous times after his verbal attacks on the "Family Compact", but his constituents kept returning him to the riding.
In December 1837, MacKenzie led an unsuccessful armed revolt, which led to the collapse of his rebellion and his need to escape to the United States.
www.toronto.ca /toronto_history/mayors_reeves/bio_mackenzie.htm   (468 words)

  
 William Lyon Mackenzie King Summary
William Lyon Mackenzie King (1874-1950) was prime minister of Canada for more than 21 years, a longer period in office than any other first minister in the history of countries in the British Commonwealth.
His father, John King, was a lawyer, and his mother, Isabel Mackenzie King, was the daughter of William Lyon Mackenzie, leader of the short-lived rebellion of 1837 in Upper Canada.
A grandson of William Lyon Mackenzie, leader of the Upper Canada Rebellion in 1837, King held five university degrees.
www.bookrags.com /William_Lyon_Mackenzie_King   (3838 words)

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