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Topic: William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham


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  William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
William Pitt was educated at Eton, and, in January 1727, was entered as a gentleman commoner at Trinity College, Oxford.
In Pitt's case, too, it is to be borne in mind that the opposition with which he had acted gradually dwindled away, and that it ceased to have any organized existence after the death of the prince of Wales in 1751.
Pitt, the first real Imperialist in modern English history, was the directing mind in the expansion of his country, and with him the beginning of empire is rightly associated.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/William_Pitt,_1st_Earl_of_Chatham   (6149 words)

  
 Wikipedia: William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham
William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, commonly known as William Pitt the Elder, (November 15, 1708 - May 11, 1778) was an English politician, born in London, who was the nominal Prime Minister and Lord Privy Seal (1766-68) and Secretary of State for the Southern Department (1756-61).
Pitt was recalled in 1766 and formed a second coalition government, not nearly successful as the first.
Chatham's second son, William Pitt the Younger, was a prominent Tory statesman at the end of the 18th century.
factbook.org /wikipedia/en/w/wi/william_pitt__1st_earl_of_chatham.html   (327 words)

  
 Chatham, William Pitt, 1st earl of. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
After the fall (1742) of Walpole, Pitt was the leading critic of Lord Carteret (later earl of Granville) in his conduct of the War of the Austrian Succession.
After the accession of George III, however, Pitt was forced to resign (1761), and he fiercely denounced the terms of the Treaty of Paris (1763), by which the war was concluded.
In 1766, Pitt was recalled to office as lord privy seal, accepted the title earl of Chatham, and formed such a broadly based ministry that it was soon impossibly divided.
www.bartleby.com /65/ch/ChathmW.html   (570 words)

  
 Pitt, the Younger
William Pitt was the second son of William Pitt, 1st earl of Chatham, a famous statesman of the mid-18th century, whose energy contributed much to Britain's successful prosecution of the Seven Years' War (1756­63) with France.
Pitt made a successful maiden speech and, in March 1782, when it was clear that a new ministry would soon be formed, announced with astonishing self-confidence that he had no intention of accepting a subordinate position.
Pitt honestly believed that there was a case against Hastings and, determined that the British name should be freed from the suspicion of injustice or oppression in the government of Asian peoples, supported the demand for an inquiry.
www.blakeneymanor.com /pitt.html   (2815 words)

  
 History Channel Search Results
Born in Hayes in Kent on May 28, 1759, Pitt, known as the Younger, was the second son of William Pitt, 1st earl of Chatham.
Pitt became chancellor of the Exchequer under Shelburne and was occupied with proposals for parliamentary and administrative reform.
Pitt's policy was to attack French trade and colonies, while subsidizing allies to fight the French on land.
www.historychannel.com /encyclopedia/article.jsp?link=FWNE.fw..pi088500.a   (690 words)

  
 WILLIAMPITT
Pitt, William [1st Earl of Chatham] (1708-1778) British politician: Pitt became Secretary of State in 1756, although he had the power of a premier.
The enmity between Pitt and the king grew so strong that Pitt resigned from his post in 1757, but was returned to power because of the popular outcry in his favor.
In 1763, Pitt supported plans for a large army to be sent to America to defend the empire, but his failing mental health prevented him from taking part in discussions about the financing of the troops.
www.multied.com /Bio/RevoltBIOS/PittWilliam.html   (272 words)

  
 Britannia Government: Prime Ministers
William Pitt, Earl of Chatham, known as 'the Great Commoner', dominated the political scene influencing government from within and without.
Pitt was the son of a member of Parliament and the grandson of Thomas Pitt who had helped to build British trade in India.
Pitt and Grenville argued over the administration of the war and in April, 1757, King George II dismissed Pitt.
www.britannia.com /gov/primes/prime5.html   (708 words)

  
 Pitt, William on Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
PITT, WILLIAM [Pitt, William] 1759-1806, British statesman; 2d son of William Pitt, 1st earl of Chatham.
Pitt's popularity increased steadily; when the king became temporarily insane (1788-89), the prime minister was able, despite the efforts of Fox, to prevent the establishment of an unlimited regency and remain in office.
William Webster, en octobre 2002, à Washington William Webster a indiqué au quotidien qu'il avait confié à Harvey Pitt êtr.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/P/Pitt-W12.asp   (1187 words)

  
 WILLIAM PITT, 1ST EARL OF CHATHAM FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Right Honourable William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham (15 November 1708–11 May 1778) was a British Whig statesman who achieved his greatest fame as war minister during the French and Indian War and who was later Prime Minister of Great Britain.
There is evidence that he was an extensively read, if not a minutely accurate classical scholar; and it is interesting to know that Demosthenes was his favourite author, and that he diligently cultivated the faculty of expression by the practice of translation and re-translation.
The Commons presented an address to the king praying that the deceased statesman might be buried with the honours of a public funeral, and voted a sum for a public monument which was erected over his grave in Westminster Abbey.
www.beskov.com /William_Pitt,_1st_Earl_of_Chatham   (5321 words)

  
 Talk:William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A man universally known as "William Pitt the Elder" is now treated under "William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham", by which he was not known, nor ever could be: the surname and the title are not used together.
He is very frequently known as William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham.
This should be enough for Chatham to be the name in use, since obviously isn't going to be called "Chatham" for the time before he received the title.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Talk:William_Pitt,_1st_Earl_of_Chatham   (742 words)

  
 William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham
William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, one of England's greatest and most famous statesmen, whose combined vision and practical ability led to a remarkable increase in English possessions and influence, was born at Golden Square, Westminister, on November 15, 1708.
Pitt determined that it should be in every sense a national war and a war at sea.
In 1760 George III came to the throne resolved, as was his chief adviser, the Earl of Bute, to end the war as speedily as possible.
www.laughtergenealogy.com /bin/histprof/misc/williampitt.html   (1419 words)

  
 Pitt, William, 1759-1806, British statesman. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Pitt’s policies included reduced expenditures, new taxes to decrease the national debt, and lower customs duties in accordance with the theories of Adam Smith.
Pitt’s popularity increased steadily; when the king became temporarily insane (1788–89), the prime minister was able, despite the efforts of Fox, to prevent the establishment of an unlimited regency and remain in office.
When the French Revolution began (1789), Pitt’s desire was for peace and neutrality, and after France finally declared war (1793) on Britain, he failed to foresee either the length or the seriousness of the conflict.
www.bartleby.com /65/pi/Pitt-W2.html   (499 words)

  
 Pitt family Papers   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Collection of correspondence by William Pitt, 1st earl of Chatham (1708-1778), Sir John Pitt, 2nd earl of chatham (1756-1835), William Pitt the younger (1759-1806), and Lady Hester Pitt, countess of Chatham (1721-1803).
There are 48 from Pitt to 1st viscount Melville; 42 to 1st viscount Sydney; 27 to George Rose; 11 to Thomas Coutts; 10 to the 1st marquess of Wellesley; to to Count Vorontsov; 6 to Lord Shelburne or his secretary, Mr.
The 1st earl of Chatham is represented by 11 letters, 1750-1772; Lady Hester Grenville Pitt by 20 letters, 1775-1799, chiefly to Thomas Coutts; and Sir John Pitt, 33 letters, 1789-1830.
www.clements.umich.edu /Webguides/Arlenes/NP/Pitt.html   (192 words)

  
 William Pitt the Elder - InfoSearchPoint.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
William Pitt the Elder, 1st Earl of Chatham (November 15, 1708 - May 11, 1778) was an English politician, born in London, who was the nominal Prime Minister and Lord Privy Seal (1766-68) and Secretary of State for the Southern Department (1756-61).
Having been previously raised to the peerage as the Earl of Chatham, Pitt resigned in October, 1768.
Pitt's second son, William Pitt the Younger, was a prominent Tory statesman at the end of the 18th century.
www.infosearchpoint.com /display/William_Pitt_the_Elder   (338 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Multimedia - William Pitt, the earl of Chatham
William Pitt, the earl of Chatham, led his country to victory over France in the Seven Years' War.
He is also known for his defense of the rights of the American colonists.
His son, William Pitt, became one of England's great prime ministers and led his country to prosperity after the financial ravages of the American Revolution.
encarta.msn.com /media_461515725_761553483_-1_1/William_Pitt_the_earl_of_Chatham.html   (76 words)

  
 Re: William Pitt, Earl of Chatham
William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, was Prime Minister of Great Britain.
His 2nd son, William Pitt (the Younger) was prime minster from age 24 and died unmarried.
Pittsburg PA, as well as Fort Pitt, was named in honour of William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham - he never visited the colony.
genforum.genealogy.com /pitt/messages/313.html   (257 words)

  
 William Pitt the Younger (1759-1806)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
The Third Coalition against Napoleon's France—an alliance with Russia, Sweden, and Austria engineered by Pitt—collapsed after the battles of Ulm and Austerlitz in 1805, and the year closed in disaster, in spite of Nelson's victory at Trafalgar in October, which ended the invasion threat and ensured Britain's naval supremacy for the rest of the war.
And, finally, Pitt had to deal with a sovereign of narrow intellect and with intense and irrational prejudices—though, indeed, these were shared by a great many of George III's subjects.
Donald G. Barnes, George III and William Pitt, 1783–1806 (1939), has long been the standard treatment of the political roles of the King and Pitt.
www.hfac.uh.edu /gbrown/philosophers/leibniz/BritannicaPages/PittYounger/PittYounger.html   (2980 words)

  
 William Pitt the Elder
William Pitt (November 15, 1708 - May 11, 1778) 1st Earl of Chatham (1766), a prominent Member of Parliament, and British Secretary of State.
Pitt led Britain to victory over France in the Seven Years' War, and turned the French and Indian War to Britain's favor.
Pitt opposed from 1774 onwards the harsh measures against the American colonies.
www.fastload.org /wi/William_Pitt_the_Elder.html   (188 words)

  
 Andrew Jackson
Earl's style produces crisp lines that distinguish the figure of Jackson and make him stand out from the muted background.
Earl became a part of the family when he married the niece of Jackson's wife in 1819.
The portraits reflect the image of a man known for strengthening the power of the presidency and the Union, the former through the use of the veto and the latter aimed at preventing states' defiance of federal law and possible secession.
www.ncartmuseum.org /artnc/object.php?themeid=5&objectid=39   (978 words)

  
 William Pitt, the Younger Biography / Biography of William Pitt, the Younger Biography
The English statesman William Pitt the Younger (1759-1806) introduced important financial and administrative reforms, girded England for war against Revolutionary and Napoleonic France, and attempted to solve the perennial Irish problem.
The second son of William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, the younger William Pitt was born on May 28, 1759, at the family estate of Hayes, near Bromley, Kent.
Pitt later outgrew his physical frailty, but he always retained the sense of personal destiny that his abi.....
www.bookrags.com /biography-william-pitt-the-younger   (249 words)

  
 William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham (1708-1778), Prime Minister
Forced by opinion on George II to save the nation in 1756, Pitt led the House of Commons and organised the victories of 1759 over France which consolidated British sea power and brought territorial gains in India and Canada.
Although suffering from manic-depression, Pitt left his sick bed in 1778 to plead for a tolerant attitude to the British colonists in America.
He was the father of William Pitt the younger.
www.npg.org.uk /live/search/person.asp?LinkID=mp00850&role=art   (168 words)

  
 earl chatham - Books, journals, articles @ The Questia Online Library
William Pitt, Earl of Chatham (Pitt the Elder)
...Petty (the Earl of Shelburne) and William Pitt (the Earl of Chatham).
CHATHAM, WILLIAM PITT, 1ST EARL OF chat m, 1708 78...dramatic, and patriotic, Chatham excelled as a war minister...of Lord Carteret (later earl of Granville) in his...seal, accepted the title earl of Chatham, and formed such a broadly...
www.questia.com /search/earl-chatham   (1642 words)

  
 Chatham, William Pitt, 1st earl of   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Chatham, William Pitt, 1st earl of, 1708–78, British statesman, known as the Great Commoner.
William Pitt, 1759–1806, British statesman - Pitt, William, 1759–1806, British statesman; 2d son of William Pitt, 1st earl of Chatham.
Pitt (the Elder), William, 1st Earl of Chatham
www.infoplease.com /ce6/people/A0811551.html   (120 words)

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